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ROYAL ONTARIO 

OF 

MINEIiALOGrl 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



MINISTER OF MINES 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING 31st DECEMBER, 



1907, 



BEING AX ACCOUNT OF 



MINING OPERATIONS FOR GOLD, COAL, ETC., 



PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 




I'llIXTEI) BY 
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY. 



VICTORIA, B. C. : 
Printed by Richard Woufknden, I.S.O., V. D., Printer to the Kind's Most Excellent Majesty. 

J90S. 



ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM 

OF 

GEOLOGY and MINERALOGY 

7$ 



IQ 



NOV 16 1965 

1022531 



8 Ed. 7 Report of the Minister of Mines. L 3 



REPORT 



OF THE 



MINISTEE OF MINES, 

1907. 



To His Honour the Honourable James Duns.muir, 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia: . 

Mat it please Your Hoxour : 

The Annual Report of the Provincial Mineralogist upon the Mining Industries of the 
Province for the year 1907 is herewith respectfully submitted. 

RICHARD McBRIDE, 

Minister of Mines. 

Minister of Mines' Office, 

March, 1908. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

University of Toronto 



http://www.archive.org/details/report190700brit 



S Ed. 7 Report of the Minister of Mines. 



REPORT OF BUREAU OF MINES. 



WILLIAM FLEET ROBERTSON, PROVINCIAL MINERALOGIST, 



:0:- 



To the Hon. Richard Mc Bride, 

Minister of Mines. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit herewith my Annual Report on the Mining Industry 
of the Province for the year ending December 31st, 1907. 

The statistical tables give the total mineral output of the Province to date, and show in 
considerable detail the actual mineral production of the past year, as based on smelter or mill 
returns ; also, a summary of the production of each of the last four years, thus illustrating by 
comparison the progress made in productive mining during this period. 

To facilitate comparison with information previously given, I have retained, as closely as 
was possible, the general form already established for such tables and for the Report. 

I have the honour to be, 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

William Fleet Robertson, 

Pro u inc ia I Mi i i e ralog 1st. 
Bureau of Mines, Victoria, B. C, 

March, 1908. 



8 Ed. 7 Report of the Minister of Mixes. L 7 



MINERAL PRODUCTION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



METHOD OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION. 

In assembling the output for the lode mines in the following tables, the established custom 
of this Bureau has been adhered to, viz. : The output of a mine for the year is considered that 
amount of ore for which the smelter or mill returns have been received during the year. This 
system does not give the exact amount mined during the year but rather the amounts credited 
to the mine on the company's books during such year. 

For ore shipped in December the smelter returns are not likely to be received until 
February in the new year, or later, and have, consequently, to be carried over to the credit of 
such new year. This plan, however, will be found very approximate for each year, and 
ultimately correct, as ore not credited to one year is credited in the next. 

In the Lode Mines tables, the amount of the shipments has been obtained from certified 
returns received from the various mines, as provided for in the "Inspection of Metalliferous 
Mines Act, 1897." In calculating the values of the products, the average price for the year in 
the New York Metal Market has been used as a basis. For silver 95 per cent., and for lead 
90 per cent., of such market price has been taken. Treatment and other charges have not 
been deducted. 



TABLE I. — Total Production for all Years up to and Including 1907. 

CJd. placer $69,549,103 

< told, lode • 45,070,717 

Silver 27,289,833 

Lead 19.1(17,197 

Copper . 43,713,122 

Coal and Coke 86,972,5 1 1 

Building stone, bricks, etc 6.693,100 

Other metals 321 1.699 



Total S299,526,28i 



TABLE II. — Production for each Year from 1890 to 1907 (inclusive). 

1852 to 1SS9 (inclusive) 871,981.634 

1890 2,608,803 

L891 3,521,1(12 

1892 2,978,530 

1893 3,588.413 

1894 4,225.717 

]s!»5 5,643.((42 

L896 7.507,!i.- 1 ii 

1897 10,455.268 

1898 10,906,861 

1899 12,393,131 

1900 16,344,751 

1901 20,086,780 

liiu2 17,486,550 

1903 17.405.054 

1004 18,077.359 

101(5 22.401,325 

1906 24.0sii.540 

1907 25,882.500 



Total >299.52U : 2^2 



L 8 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1908 



SHOWING MINERAL PRODUCTION 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



1SS6 : 1837 


1888 


1889 


1890 


189! 


1892 | 1893 


1894 


1896 


189K 


1897 


1898 


1899 


1900 


190! 


13C2 i 1903 


1304 


1905 


1906 


1907 














































327. 000,000 
26,500.000 
26.000,000 
25.500.000 
25.000.000 
24,500.000 
24.000 000 
23,500.000 
2 3.000.000 
22,500.000 
22.000.000 
21,500,000 
21.000.000 
20.500.000 
20.001 
19.50) 
19.000,000 
l«. 5 00, 000 
13,000,000 
17.500,000 
17,000,000 
16,500.000 
16,000.000 
15,500,000 
J 5,000.000 
14.500,000 
14,000,000 
13.500,000 
13,000,000 
12,500 000 
12,000,000 
1 1.500,000 
11,000,000 
10,500,000 
10.000,000 
9,500,000 
9,000,000 
8,500,000 
8,000,000 
7,500,000 
7,000.000 
6,500,000 
6,000,000 
5,500,000 
5,000,000 
4,500,000 
4,000,000 
3,500,000 
3,000,000 
2,500,000 
2,000,000 
1,500,000 
1,000,000 
500.000 
000.000 




























































































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8 Ed. 7 



Mineral Production. 



L 9 



Table IV. gives a statement in detail of the amount and value of the different mineral 
products for the years 1905, 1906 and 1907. As it has been impossible as yet to collect 
accurate statistics regarding building stone, lime, bricks, tiles, etc., these are estimated. 

TABLE IV. 

Amount and Value of Mineral Products for 1905, 1906 and 1907. 





Customary 
Measure. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 




Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Gold, placer 


Tons, 2,240Ibs 


48,465 

238,660 

3,439,417 

56,580,703 

37,692,251 

1.384,312 

271,785 


8 969,300 
4,933,102 
1,971,818 
2,399,022 
5,876.222 
4,152,936 
1,358,925 
800,000 

$22,461,325 




$ 948,400 
4,63o.03!i 
1,897,320 
2,667,578 
8,288,565 
4,551,909 
996,135 
1,000,000 


41,450 

106,179 

2,745,448 

47,738,703 

40,832,720 

1,800,067 

222.913 


$ S2S,000 
4,055,020 
1,703,825 
2.291,458 
8,166,544 
6,300,235 
1,337,478 
1,200,000 


224,027 

2,990,262 

52,408,217 

42,990,488 

1,517,303 

199,227 


Lead 

Copper 

Coal 


















$24,980,546 


$25,882,560 



TABLE V. 
Production of Mineral by Districts and Divisions. 



Name. 


Divisions. 


Districts. 




1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1905. 


1906. 


19G7. 


Cariboo District 








$ 406,000 


$ 405,400 


8 360,500 


Quesnel » .... 


$ 300,000 
96,000 

10,000 


| 355, 81 10 

.•i'.t.tion 
10,000 


$ 306,500 
4-1.000 
10,000 
















Cassias, District 


.301.372 
.3,339,154 
5,421, S59 


555,599 

5,171.024 
4,660,3.311 


572,809 


East Kuotfnay District 








5,548.880 


West Kootenay District 








4,792.976 




100.273 

532,564 

970,544 

3,672,828 

14.3,6.30 


268,111 

515,709 

532,228 

3,223,587 

120,717 


364,868 

614,395 
619,842 

3,049.702 
144,109 












Slocan n 
















Li li. ik et District 






32,584 
6,483,504 


2n,314 
8,779,711 


15,721 


Vale District .' 








8,444,326 


Osoyoos, Grand Forks & Green - 


6,356,410 
1,533 

125.501 


S, 60S. 470 

2,624 

78,617 


S 3.34 99.3 




Similkameen Division 


56,564 

32,767 
















Coast Districts (Nanaimo, Alber- 
ni, Clayoquot, Quatsino, Vic- 
toria) 


4,273,852 
$22,461,325 


5,388,146 


0,147,348 














$24,980,546 


$25,882,560 



L 10 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



190S 



PLACER GOLD. 

Table VI. contains the yearly production of placer gold to date, as determined by the 
returns, sent in by the banks and express companies, of gold transmitted by them to the mints, 
and from returns sent in by the Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders. To these yearly 
amounts one-third was added up to the year 1878, from then to 1895 and from 1898 to 1907, 
one-fifth, which proportions are considered to represent, approximately, the amount of gold 
sold of which there is no record. This placer gold contains from 10 to 25 per cent, silver, but 
the silver value has not been separated from the totals, as it would be insignificant. 

TABLE VI. — Yield of Placer Gold per Year to Date. 



1858.. 

1859.. 
I860.. 
1861.. 
1862. . 
1863.. 
1864.. 
1865.. 
1866.. 
1867.. 
1868.. 
1869.. 
1870.. 
1871.. 
1872.. 
1873.. 
1874.. 



705,000 
1,615,070 
2,228,543 
2,666,118 
2,656,903 
3,913,563 
3,735. 
3,491,205 
2, m-2.106 
0,868 
3,372,972 
1,774,978 
1,336,956 
1,799,440 
1,610,972 
1,305,749 
1.844,618 



1875. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
L884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1-7. 

;- - 

1889. 

1890 ; 

1891. 



8 2,474,004 
1,786,648 
1,608,182 
1,275,204 
1,290,058 
1,013,827 
1,046,737 
954,085 
794,252 
736,165 
713,738 
903,651 
693,709 
616.731 
588,923 
490,435 
429,811 
Total 



1892.. 


. . 8 399,526 


1893.. 


356,131 


1894.. 


405,516 


1895.. 


481,683 


1896.. 


544,026 


1897.. 


513,520 


1898.. 


643,346 


1899.. 


. . 1,344,900 


1900.. 


.. 1,278,724 


1901.. 


970,100 


19(J2.. 


. . 1,073,140 






1904.. 


.. 1,115,300 


1905.. 


969.300 


1906.. 


948.400 


1907.. 


-sooo 




869,549,103 



TABLE VII. — Production of Lode Mixes.* 



- 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Lead. 


Copper. 


Total 

Values. 


- 


Oz. 


Value. 


Oz. 


Value. 


1'nuuds. 


Value. 


Pouuds. 


Value. 


18 -7 




s 


17,690 

79,780 

53,192 

7". 427 

4,500 

77.160 

227,00M 

746.379 

1,496,522 

3,135.343 

5.472,971 

4,292,401 

2,939.413 

3,958.175 

5.151.333 

3,917.017 

2,996,2(14 

3,222,481 

3,439,417 

2,990,262 

2,745.44s 

47.034.nl5 


s 
17.331 

75. ■•Mil: 

47,873 

73.94S 

4,000 

66,935 

105.(1011 

470.219 

977.229 

2.100,689 

3,272,836 

2.375.S41 

1,663,70S 

2.309,200 

2,884.745 

1,941,328 

1,521,472 

1,719,516 

1,971,818 

1,897.32(1 

1,703,825 


204,800 
674,500 
165,100 

mi. 

xn. 

808,420 
2,135,023 

5,662.523 
16,475. 4i i4 
24,199,977 
38,841,135 
31,693,559 
2l.s62.436 
63,358.621 
51,582,906 
22,536,381 
18,089,283 
36,046.244 
56,580,703 
52,498,217 
47.73S.7d3 

401.663.995 


9.216 

29,813 

6.498 

Nil. 

Xil. 

33,064 

78.996 

169,875 

532.255 

721,384 

1,39(1.517 

1.1(77,581 

878,870 

2.691,887 

2,002,733 

S24.832 

689,744 

1,421,874 

2,399,022 

2,667,578 

2,291,458 




8 


26,547 

104,813 


1SS8 










1889 










54,371 


1S90 










73,948 


1891 










4,000 


] v'!-' 










99,999 


1893 


1,170 

6,252 

39,264 

02.259 

106.141 

110,061 

138,315 

107.153 

210,384 

236.491 

232.831 

222,042 

238,660 

224.027 

I'M]. 17!:' 

2,191,229 


23,404 

125.1114 
785,271 
1,244,180 
2,122,820 
2.2(11.217 
2.S57.573 
3,453,381 
4.34s.0<>3 
4,888,269 
4.sl2,616 
4,589,608 
4,933,102 
4,6:; i 
4,055,020 






297.4(10 


1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 


324.680 

952,840 

3,818,556 

5,325, ISO 

7.271.67S 

7,722,591 

9,997,080 

27,603,746 

29.636,057 

34.359,921 

35,710,128 

37,602.251 

42,990,488 

40,832,720 

284.237,916 


16.234 

47.642 

190,926 

266.258 

874. 781 

1,351.453 

1,615,289 

4.446,963 

3,446,673 

4,547,535 

4. 57s. ((37 

5,876.222 

8,288,565 

8,166.544 


781,342 

2.342.397 

4,257.179 

7,052,431 

0.529,420 

0.751,604 

10,069,757 

13,683,044 

11,101,102 

11,571,367 

12.309,035 

15.180,164 

17,484,102 

16,216,S47 


To'l 


45.07n.717 


27.239,833 


19.917,197 


43,713,122 


135,990,869 



' Not included in above is 1,356 tons of zinc ore— worth 546,100, and 1,500 tons iron ore — worth 

* The information as to production in the earlier years is obtained from the " Mineral Statistics and Mines " for 1S96, Geological 
Survey of Canada. 



8 Ed. 7 Mineral Production. L 11 



TABLE VIII. — Coal and Coke Production per Year to Date. 

Coal. 

Years Toys (2,240 lbs). Value. 

1836-67 222,673 $ 891,704 

1868 44,005 176,020 

1869 35,802 143,208 

1870 29*843 119,372 

1871-2-3 148,519 493,836 

1874 81,547 244,641 

is;-") 110,145 330,435 

1876 139,192 417,576 

1877 154,052 462,156 

1878 170,846 512,538 

1879 241,301 723,903 

1880 267,595 802,785 

1881 228,357 685,071 

1882 282,139 846,417 

1883 213,299 639,897 

1884 394,070 1,182,210 

1885 265,596 796,788 

1886 326,636 979,908 

1887 413,360 1,240,080 

1888 489,301 1,467,903 

1889 579,830 1,739,490 

1890 678,140 2,034,420 

1891 1,029,097 3,087,291 

1892 826,335 2,479,005 

1893 978,294 2,934,882 

1894 1,012,953 3,03S,859 

1895 939,654 2,818,962 

1896 896,222 : . . . 2,688,666 

1897 882,854 2,648,562 

1898 1,135,865 3,407,595 

1899 1,306,324 3,918,972 

1900 1,439,595 4,318,785 

1901 1,460,331 4,380,993 

190" 1,397,394 4,192,182 

1903 1,168,194 3,504,582 

1904 1,253,628 3,760,884 

1905 1,384,312 4,152,936 

1906 1,517,303 4,551,909 

1907 1,800,067 6,300,235 



Total 25,944,700 tons. 879,115,658 

Coke. 

1895-7 19,396 8 96,980 

1898 (estimated) 35,000 175,000 

1899 34,251 171,255 

1900 ...' 85,149 425,745 

1901 127,081 635,405 

1902 128,015 640,075 

1903 165,543 827,715 

1904 238,428 1,192,140 

1905 271,785 1,358,925 

1906 199,227 996,135 

1907 222,913. 1,337,178 



Total 1,526,788 tons. $7,856,853 



L 12 



Report of the Minister of Minks. 



1908 



TABLE IX. — Production in Detail of the 





Year 


Toxs. 


Gold— Placer. 1 Gold— Lode. 


Silver. 


Lead. 


District. 


Dunces 


Value. 


Ounces. 


Value. 


Ounces. 


Value. 


Founds. 


Value. 










8 




a 




8 




9 




1904 
1905 
1906 
1U07 
1904 

1907 
ltf04 

1907 




15,650 
L5.CO0 

17,700 

15.325 

i ,500 

4,800 
1,980 

2,200 
580 

5 1 10 
500 

500 


313,00 

- 
306,500 

150,000 
44,000 

11,600 

1". 

10,000 






















































Quesnel ,, 








































































































19C4 

1907 

1905 

1 •■ i 
1907 


303 
143 

5.394 

9.611 


26,500 
23,750 
22,750 
20,400 
576 
1,250 

1,250 


530,000 
175, 

408.000 
11,500 

-:.-.' 00 
44,00 ■ 
25.000 




















































Liard, Stikine and 
Skeena Divisions. 


766 

187 

■•> 

165 


15,833 

3,865 

41 

3,410 


185 

477 
26 

2,291 


99 

274 

16 

1,422 




233 
















1904 

191 1.', 
1906 
1907 
lau4 

1905 
1906 
1L07 


76,895 
170,073 

180,036 

154.963 
365 
226 
243 

64 


1,000 
708 

520 

550 

50 
50 


20,000 
14,160 
10,400 

10.000 
1,000 

1,000 






590, 1S6 

1,137,872 

1,049,536 

821,367 

20,964 

16,880 

22,174 

3,955 


314,923 

665,931 

509 74C 

11,186 

9,677 

14,069 

2,455 


21,071,236 
48, 248.-28 

44.4-;.i-; 
37,526,194 

401,022 
149 584 

167.691 

73,842 


817,564 








2,045,750 

2,264,413 

1,801.257 

15,559 




6 


" 124 




14 

10 


289 
2C7 


6,342 
8,535 








3.544 














1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 

1904 

1905 
ly06 
1907 

1904 
1905 

1906 

1907 

lvi04 
1905 
1906 

1907 
la04 

1905 
1906 
1907 


14,569 

3,331 

19,431 

17,781 

74.442 

50,090 
50,135 
52,693 

14,973 

18.412 
312,991 
330,618 
279,527 

285,923 

20,494 

22,302 

8,715 

5,845 






2 
28 
19 

118 

14,100 

17,667 

11,677 

13,383 

160 

134 

69 

14 

133,095 

129,843 

105,356 

94.573 

3,015 
2.7H7 
2,048 

1,168 


41 
579 

393 

2,439 
291,447 
365,177 

241,364 

276,627 

3,307 
2,770 
1.420 

289 
2,751,074 

2,683,855 

2.177.7H.) 

1,954,824 

74.722 
55,954 
42,332 

24,i4j 


90,004 
99,781 
165.915 
301,322 
198,795 
11 0.7 -JO 
211,122 

236,837 
1,540,170 
1,045,948 

571.613 
590,998 
181,830 

147.753 
120,174 

126,661 

148.201 
121,551 

79.262 
122.232 


48,026 
57,204 

105,273 

187,000 

lOO,' '77 
66,921 
133,957 
146.981 
821.835 
599,642 
362,688 

366.773 

.'7- 24 
84,707 
b0,057 
78X03 
79,080 
69,681 
50,292 
75,857 


3,091,648 
1,002,114 

3,654.775 

970,570 

1,368,388 

1,034,553 

1,582.113 

10,611,227 
5,399,330 
2,975,674 
4,305,826 


119,956 








42,490 








161,524 


Nelson ,-. 
Slocan & Slocan City. 


150 
150 
50 
50 


::. 

3,000 

1.000 


175,429 

i 

58. "20 
52,659 

75,942 

411.710 
228,932 
151,462 








203,680 


Trail Creek n 


























Revelstoke, Trout 
Lake and Lardeau 
Divisions. 


50 
28 
200 
250 


i,666 

5,600 

4,000 

5,000 


4,514 

485,52'! 
339,883 
469,000 
566.020 


217 
18,838 
14,411 
23,872 

27.169 


Lillooet M. D. and 


1904 

1906 
1907 

1904 
1905 

1907 
1904 

1905 
1906 
1907 

1905 

li07 


40 
133 

215 

309 

801 ,925 

65,628 

1,182,517 

1,173,416 

88 

3 

11 

1,900 

14.042 

3,837 

348 


1.725 

1,500 

840 

too 

150 

90 
165 

75 

125 

t 57 

125 

50 

1,560 

230 
250 
150 


34,500 
30,1 IJ 
16,800 
12,000 

3,000 
1,800 
3,300 
1,500 
2,501-1 
1,140 
2,500 
1.000 
31,200 
4,600 

3.000 


4 
125 

170 

180 

78,689 
94,125 

81,218 


83 
2,584 
3 514 

3,721 

1 U" 38g 
1,626,501 
1,945,564 

1,678,776 








































245,155 
630,407 
671,661 

469,203 


130,815 

361,412 
426,169 

291.189 


9,021 
67,076 

25,419 




(Grand Forks, Green- 
wood and Osoyoos 
Divisions.) 

Similkameen, Nicola, 


350 
2,844 
5.113 
1,220 


v*emon Div'ns. 


19 
6 














124 












14 

625 
3,803 
1,034 

209 


9 

334 

2,215 

656 

130 






Yale, Ashcroft and 


183 

610 
215 

20 


3,783 
12,608 

4,444 
413 






Kamloops Divisions 


















Coast (Nanaimo, Al- 






berni, Clayoquot, 


1907 

1904 
1905 

1907 

1904 
1905 

1907 


SI, 383 

61,126 

218,846 

84.738 


150 
10 

7,1 1 

50 


2,0 
1,000 

1,000 


l-i 612 

10,330 
5,334 


03 0SC 

110,254 


118,156 
91,745 

70,356 


110,117 
67,739 

58,212 

43,663 






sino, New West- 






r and Victoria 






Divisions). 













(other metals, build- 




















ing -tone, brick, etc.) 


































































1,115,300 

969,300 
948,400 

$828,000 


4,933,102 

$ 4.055.020 




1,719,516 
1,971,818 

$ 1,703.825 






Totals 


1,461,609 
1.804,114 


55,765 
48,465 
47,420 

41.450 


222.042 
224.027 

193.179 


3,222,481 

3.439,417 

2.745,448 


36,646,244 

52,4 - 
47.738.703 


2,399,022 
2,667,578 

$2,291,458 



+ Includes Platinum. { Inclu ling 1,356 tons Zinc ore, valued al - . ml 1,500 tons Iron ore, valued at - 



8 Ed. 7 



Production of Metalliferous Mines. 



L 13 



Metalliferous Mines for 1904, 1905, 1906 and 1901 



COPPKR. 


Totals for Divisions. 


Totals for Districts. 


Pounds. 


Value. 


1904. 


L905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 




i 


$ 


3 


f 


a 


474,600 


$ 

106, 


% 

405,400 


360,500 






313,000 












300,000 










• 










355,800 




















306,500 














] 50,000 


















96,000 




















39,600 




















44,000 














11,600 














10,000 




















10,000 




















10,000 


















558,573 


504,372 


555,599 


572,809 






530,000 












475,000 




















455,000 




















408,000 










8,900 


1,141 


28,573 














29,372 














293,269 


56,542 
134,977 




100,599 












674,887 






164,809 














1,180,933 


- ;t n .14 


.-,. X-4_sa7 


2,327,120 






1,152,487 














2,712,252 




















2,940,744 




















2,321.121 










5,472 


701 
1,654 

1,332 


28,446 














10,60C 


18,962 














6,910 




24,143 














5,999 





















5,806,070 


5,257,659 


i. 4-. :■ 


4,707,876 




168,023 
















100,273 




















267,190 




















364,868 










220,500 

112,663 


28,268 
14,446 
41,651 
86,845 


466,683 














507,564 














216,034 




470,631 












434,222 






587,395 












1,236,858 


















831,344 








v 






2,861 


552 




516.12S 


















573,742 










7,119,876 


912,768 

904,266 

915.S21 

1,016,055 


3,760,S66 














5,800,294 


3,672,828 














4,7.",li 110 




3,173,587 












5,080,275 






3,049,702 












173,640 


















145,650 














1,145 


221 




120,717 
















132,169 






















32,584 


20,314 


15,721 






34,583 












32,584 


20,314 




































15,721 




















4,190,281 


< .4 ifl4 


8,674,710 


8289 288 


22,066,407 


2 B2S H 

4,313,853 

6,213,323 

6.304.310 


4,110,366 










27,670,644 


6,306,410 














32,226,782 




8,593,469 












31,521,550 






8,276,995 












2,500 


















1,533 




















2,624 










2,586 


51.7 
12,098 

106,138 

68,517 
7,224 






1,526 










328,380 


77,415 












680,808 


12' .11 














78,617 










36,120 




10,767 


















1,179,295 


-■ i 1 1 


i .:(. ■ ■ ■<> 


771,533 


5,960,593 


764,148 
535,865 
990,606 

616,616 


1,179,295 










.'1,437,236 


784,131 


1,263,339 












5,138,000 






3,083,080 




771,533 


















600,000 


800,000 


1,000,000 


1,200,000 






600,000 












S00,000 




















1,000,000 




















1,200,000 





























35,710,128 


4,578,037 
5,876,222 

$ 8.166,544 


$14,024,335 




sl4,024,335 


$16,949,464 






37,692,251 


116,949,464 










12,990,488 




. 






513 4 9, 502 




40,832.720 


$ 18,244,847 






$ 18,244,847 



L 14 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1908 





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a 




















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f 




















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i- v 






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1858 


























1896 


1897 


1898 


1899 


1900 


1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


19051908 


1907 








































































































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8,500,000 
8,400,000 
8,300,000 
8,200,000 
8, 100,000 
8,000,000 
7,900,000 
7,800,000 
7,700,000 
7,600,000 
7,500,000 
7,400,000 
7,300,000 
7,200,000 
7.100,000 



L 15 



ian that 

ast year 

of 1905 

of low- 
oHieries, 

ear, but 
as very 

>al, was 
allowing 
t Steele 



}f these 

ring the 
4 in the 
I. D. 
r 1907; 
:o"ether 



: Mixes. 



Total. 



117 

422 

8 

129 
295 
313 
751 
70 
4 

1,241 

8 

1 

338 

3,697 



TABLB 






iMM^mtiM mt mam 


» I1U 


M 


Wi 


«M 


i.< 


110 


Ml 


■71 


■ 7.1 


■ 14 


■ IS 


•!■ 


■n 


■ 71 


■ ia 


mi 


Ul 


MI 


MJ 


M4 


MI 


IU> 


IMI 


Ml 


MS 


■90 


«»1 


■ M 


•u 


■ M 


111 


nm 


■si 


•w 


SSS 


MO 


SOI HOI 


•HIM* 


Kwiamiv 




























































































8, S°o. 


5 
















































































































































































8.300, 






















































































1 -. 


8,200, 






















































































— 1— 


8, loo. 






















































































1 


_ 7,900 














































































































































































7,800 






















































































j .- 


_ 7.70O 
7.5°° 












































































































































































-J. 
























































































.7.400 






















































































1 


.7.300 






















































































-1 — 


_7."oo 
























































































7,100 






















































































1 


_ 7,000 
























































































6, goo 






















































































i 


6,800 
























































































6,700 






















































































1 


6.600 
























































































~t'.i£> 












































































































































































1 


_ 6,300 
























































































6,200 






















































































(- 


6,100 
- 6,000 










































































































































































\-f I — 


5.900 














































































/ 




s 






.5.800 














































































/ 




S 




\ 




















































































_I 


















































































/ 






-' 
























































































?l 








































































































































































— J 








1 
















































































/ 
































































































1 




kooc 










































































jiF 








l- v 














































































si 


/ 


^^ 


h 


(£ 




_»,8oo 



















































































fy 










































































a/ 
























































































» 




/ 




















































































9 


J 










y> 


_».4oo 








































































^ 


/ 


-1 


v 


—L 






/ 












































































1 


fs 








/ 


\4.«oo 
















































































1/ 








-\»,.oo 








































































| 






\ 






•jf 














































































/I 




















































































I 






\ 


A 








3,800 
















































































/ \ 








3.700 




> 




















































































3,600 




\ 








































































' 1 












































































































































































| 


i * 












3.300 








































































I 




f!;| 






















■ 
































































S 


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; 




























































■ / 


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1 














; 




























































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/ 




















| 




























































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2,800 






; 




J 




























































I'- 


"/ 




|: 












2.70c 










! 




























































'J 


J 




|!l 












2,60c 


' 






'-.j 
































































/ 




y 












.— 3 .5°c 


/ 


































































1 








i 












L 2,40c 




































































; , 




i 




a 




































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'- 




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. 














































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\ 


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2,100 


Jt 






















,' 


V. 






































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i 


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2,000 
























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^_ 1,800 




































































', 






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1,600 
















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. 600 
































































f , 
















































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8 Ed. 7 



Progress of Mining. 



L 15 



PROGRESS OF MINING. 



The value of the mineral products of the Province for the year 1907 is greater than that 
for any preceding year, and amounts to 825,882,560, showing an increase over the last year 
of 8902,014, equivalent to an increase of 3.6 per cent., and is greater than the output of 1905 
about 15.2 per cent., and 36.3 per cent, greater than that of 1904. 

An analysis of the returns shows that this increase is due to the greater tonnage of low- 
grade ore mined in the Boundary district, and also to an increased tonnage from the collieries, 
both in coal and coke. 

The market price for all the metals was unusually high foi the first part of the year, but 
fell so low during the last half of the year that the average market price for 1907 was very 
little, if any, higher than that of 1906. 

The tonnage of ore mined in the Province during the year 1907, exclusive of coal, was 
1,804,114 tons. This total tonnage was produced by the various districts in the following 
proportions: — Boundary, 65.1 percentage of total; Rossland, 15.8; Coast, 4.7; Fort Steele 
M. D., 8.6; all other Districts, 5.8. 

The number of mines from which shipments were made in 1907 was 147 ; but of these 
only 72 shipped more than 100 tons each during the year. 

There were in the Province 36 mines that shipped in excess of 1,000 tons each during the 
year, and of these 1 1 were in the Boundary District, 8 in the Nelson, 6 on the Coast, 4 in the 
Rossland, 3 in the Fort Steele M. D., 3 in the Slocan District, and 1 in the Lardeau M. D. 

The following table shows the number of mines which shipped ore during the year 1907 ; 
the Districts in which they are located, and the tonnage produced in each district, together 
with the number of men employed, both above and below ground : — - 

Table Showing Distribution of Shipping Mines in 1907. 





Tons of 

Ore 
Shipped. 


No. ol 

Mines 

Shipping. 


No. of 

Mines 

Shipping 

over 100 

tons in 

1907. 


Men Employed in these Mixes. 




Below. 


Above. 


Total. 


Cassiar : 


9,611 

154,963 
64 

17,781 

52.693 

18,412 

285,923 

5,845 

309 

1,173,416 

348 

11 

84,738 


2 

4 
4 

19 
24 
41 

7 
6 
1 

22 
2 

1 
14 


2 

3 



6 
12 
15 
4 
2 
1 

15 

1 



11 


45 

306 
6 

97 
166 
236 
563 

53 
2 

929 
5 

1 
176 


72 

116 
2 

32 
129 

77 

188 

17 

2 

312 

3 



162 


117 


East Kootexay : 

Fort Steele 


4 9 2 


West Kootexay : 

Nelson 


8 

129 
295 




313 


Trail 


751 




70 


LlLLOOET 


4 


Yale : 


1,241 


Coast 


8 

1 

338 






Total 


1,804,114 


147 


72 


2,585 


1,112 


3,697 







L 16 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1908 



In explanation of the table, it should be said that in its preparation, a mine employing 
12 men for four months is credited in the table with four men for 12 months, so that the total 
given is less than the actual number of individuals who worked in mines during the year. 

The "labour employed to the ton of ore mined " forms some criterion of the total cost of 
mining in a camp, since the cost of labour is in a more or less constant proportion to such 
total cost. In this respect it is interesting to note in the various districts the number of tons 
of ore mined to each man employed. An analysis of the above table shows, approximately, 
that, taking the Province as a whole, there were 488 tons of ore mined for each man emplo} r ed 
about the mines. In this respect, however, the districts vary very materially, since in the 
Slocan District the figures show 59 tons mined to the man in the year, in the Nelson District 
179 tons, in Trail Creek (Rossland) District 387 tons, and in the Boundary 946 tons. 

Such generalisation, of course, does not apply exactly to any one mine, but only to the 
district, and in the first two districts mentioned the mines vary in character so greatly, some 
having high-grade shipping ores, and others low-grade concentrating ores, that care must be 
taken not to carry these average figures too far. 

Table Showing Non-Shipping Mines and Number of Men Employed, 1907. 



District. 


Number 

of 
Mines. 


M en 

employed 

underground. 


Men 

employed 

above ground. 


Total, 


Coast and Cassiak 


7 
6 

28 
6 
1 
3 

10 


23 
6 

49 
3 


12 

26 


49 

1 
66 
1 

4 
6 


72 


East Kootenay (Ft. Steele & Windermere) 
Slocan D. (Slocan, Slocan City, Ainsworth) 
Nelson 


115 

4 


Lardeau and Trout Lake 




16 


Boundary 


32 






Total 


61 


119 


127 


246 







STATISTICAL TABLES. 

Referring to the preceding Statistical Tables of the mineral production of the Province, 
the following is a summary of their contents : — 

Table I. shows the total gross value of each mineral product that has been mined in the 
Province up to the end of 1907. From this it will be seen that coal mining has produced more 
than any separate class of mining — a total of $86,972,511 — followed next in importance by 
placer gold at $69,549,103, and third by lode gold at $45,070,717. 

The metal gold, derived from both placer and lode mining, amounts to $114,619,720, the 
greatest amount derived from any one mineral, the next most important being coal, the total 
gross value of which, combined with that of coke, is $86,972,511, followed by copper at 
843,713,122, silver at $27,289,833, and lead at $19,917,197. 

Table II. shows the values of the total production of the mines of the Province for each 
year from 1890 to 1907, during which period the output has increased nearly ten-fold, and has 
now reached a production, for the past year, valued at $25,882,560, or more than double what 
it was in 1899. 

The value of the total products of the mines of the Province up to the end of 1907 is 
$299,526,282. 

Table III. presents in graphical form the facts shown by figures in the tables, and 
demonstrates to the eye the rapid growth of lode mining in the Province and also the fluctua- 
tions to which it has been subject. 



8 Ed. 7 Progress of Mining. L 1, 



It will be seen that although coal mining has been a constantly increasing industry during 
this whole period of 20 years, lode mining did not begin practically until 1894, since when it 
has risen with remarkable rapidity, though not without interruption, until now it has nearly 
reached the 817,000,000 line, and the total production has nearly reached the 826, 000,000 
line. 

Table IV. gives the amounts, in the customary units of measure, and the values, of the 
various metals or minerals which go to make up the grand total of the mineral production of 
the Province, and also, for purposes of comparison, similar data for the two preceding years. 

The table shows that there has been a decrease in the production of placer gold of some 
8120,100, and at the same time a decrease in the output of lode gold of 8575,619, making 
a total decrease of §696,019 in the production of the metal. 

The amount of silver produced this past year was 2,745,14:8 ounces, having a gross value 
of 81,703,825, a decrease from the preceding year of 8193,495, due chiefly to the decreased 
production of the Slocan District. 

The table shows an output of lead in 1907 amounting to 47,738,703 lbs., valued at 
82,291.458, which is a decrease from the production of the preceding year of 4,669,514 lbs. 
of lead. 

Table V. shows the proportions of the total mineral productions made in each of the 
various districts into which the Province is divided. 

It will be noted that this year again the Boundary District has the honour of first place 
on the list, followed in order of output by the Coast District and East Kootenay, with "West 
Kootenay, for many years our greatest producer, as only fourth on the list. 

The Coast and East Kootenay Districts, however, owe a considerable percentage of their 
outputs to the coal mines situated within their limits, whereas in" the other districts the pro- 
duction is entirely from lode mining. 

Table VI. gives the statistical record of the placer mines of the Province from 1858 to 
1907, and shows a total production of 869,549,103. The output for 1907 was 8^28.000, a 
decrease of about 12.7 % as compared with the previous year, and due to a dry season with a 
shortage of water for hydraulic mining. 

Table VII. relates entirely to the lode mines of the Province, and shows the amounts 
and values of the various metals produced each year since 1887 — the beginning of such 
mining in the Province. The gross value of the product of these mines to date is 8135,990,869. 
The production in 1907 was 816,216,847, a decrease from the preceding year of 81,267,255, or 
about 7.2 %. 

Table VIII. contains the statistics of production of the coal mines of the Province. The 
total amount of coal mined to the end of 1907 is 25,944,700 tons (2,240 lbs), worth 879,115,658. 
Of this there was produced in 1907 some 1,800,067 tons, valued at 86,300,235, a larger 
amount than has been produced in any previous year. 

In these figures of coal production the coal used in making coke is not included, as such 
coal is accounted for in figures of output of coke. 

The amount of coal used in 1907 in making coke was 419,541 tons, from which was 
made 222,913 tons of coke, having a value of §1,337,478, an increase over the preceding year 
of 23,686 tons of coke, equal to 11.9 \, with an increase in value of 8341,343 on the whole 
production. 

While 222,913 tons of coke were actually made, only 215,689 tons weie sold, owing to 
the sudden shutting down of the smelters in the Interior, necessitating the carrying over of 
7,224 tons of coke in stock. 



L 18 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



Within the last two years the selling prices of coal and coke have risen, and it has been 
estimated that the average selling prices are now approximately $3.50 per ton (2,240 lbs.) for 
coal, and for coke §6 per ton of 2,240 lbs., which prices have been used in calculating the 
values of these productions. The prices formerly used in such calculations were $3 and $5 
per ton respectively. 

More detailed statistics as to the coal production of the Province and of the separate 
districts are given elsewhere in this Report. 

Table IX. gives the details of production of the mines of the Province (excepting coal 
mines) for the years 1904, 1905, 1906 and 1907, and the districts in which such productions 
were made, showing the tonnage of ore mined in each district, with its metallic contents, and 
market value. 

The total tonnage of ore mined in the Province during the past year was 1,804,114 ton , 
having a gross value of 818,244,847. 

The following table shows the percentages of such tonnage and values derived from the 

various districts of the Province : — 

Boundary District 65.1 per cent, of tonnage and 47.6 percent, of values. 

Fernie Creek, M. D 15.9 ,, ■, 17.5 „ 

Coast District 4.7 » » 4.5 n n 

Fort Steele M. D 8.6 ,, „ 13.2 ,, 

Slocan District 1.0 n « 3.3 n « 

Miscellaneous and other Divisions 4.7 « " 13.9 » « 

100 100 

Table X. compares graphically the output of mineral products in British Columbia with 
that of similar products in all the other Provinces of the Dominion, and shows that in 1907 
British Columbia produced of the metals and coal an amount over 35.4 per cent, of that of all 
the other Canadian Provinces combined. 



COAL. 



The actual production of coal in British Columbia during the year 1907 has been practi- 
cally confined to the Crow's Xest Pass Collieries in South-East Kootenay, and to the 
Wellington Colliery Co. and the Western Fuel Co., operating on Vancouver Island. In 
addition to these, a new colliery has been opened up at Middlesboro, near Coutlee, in the 
Nicola valley, by the Nicola Valley Coal and Coke Co., which shipped during the last three 
months of the year, since it acquired railway connection, some 10,000 tons of coal. 

On Vancouver Island three new collieries have begun shipping, as yet on a very small 
scale, but still a beginning. These new collieries have shipped as follows : — The Gilfillan 
Colliery at Wellington, operated by Macgowan & Co., 2,848 tons ; the Fiddick Colliery at 
South Wellington, operated by the South Wellington Coal Mines, Ltd. (John Arbuthnot 
et al.), 575 tons, and the new East Wellington Colliery at Nanaimo, operated by the Van- 
couver-Nanaimo Coal Mining Co., Ltd., 156 tons. 

In the tables and statistics the output of the Middlesboro Colliery has been included in 
the Coast Collieries. 

The gross output of the coal mines of the Province for the year 1907 was 2,219,608 tons 
(2,240 lbs.), of which 44,760 tons were added to stock, leaving a total consumption of 2,174,848 
tons of coal ; of this amount, 916,262 tons were sold for consumption in Canada, 673,114 
tons were sold for export, making the total of coal sales for the year 1,589,376 tons; of the 
balance of the coal, 419,541 tons were used in making coke, and 165,931 tons under colliery 
boilers, etc. 



8 Ed. 7 



Progress of Mixing. 



L 19 



From this amount of coal there were produced 222,913 tens (2,240 Bbs.) of coke, of which 
7,221 tons were added to stock, leaving the net coke sales of 215,689 tons, of which 155,579 
tons were consumed in Canada and 60.110 tons exported. 

The following table indicates the markets in which the coal and coke output of the 
Province was sold : — 



Coal. 



Sold for consumption in Canada. . 
// export to United States . . 
// export to other countries 



, (Tons— 2, 240 lbs) 



COKK. 



Sold for consumption in Canada. . 
n export to United States . . 
a export to other countries . 



Total for District. . . . 



Total for District. . . 



Coast. 



698,041 
359,666 

22,038 

1,079,74.3 



(Tons— 2,240 Its) 14,592 

220 



14,812 



Crow's Nest 
Pass. 



218.221 
291,410 



509,631 



140,987 
59,890 



200, S77 



Total 
for Province. 



916,262 

651,076 

22.038 



1,589,376 



155,579 
60,110 



215,689 



Coast Collieries. 

The Coast Collieries mined in 1907 some 1,312,877 tons of coal, which, less the 41,760 
tons added to stock, makes the total amount of coal disposed of 1,298,117 tons, distributed 
as follows : — 

Sold as coal in Canada 698,011 tons 

ii United States 359,666 n 

H other countries 22„038 n 

Total sold as coal 1,079,715 

Used under companies' boilers, etc 12 1,701 

Used in making coke 96,671 

1,298,117 

The total coal sales of the Coast Collieries show an increase of 99,673 tons, or about 
10.2 % over the preceding year, and the increase would have been very much greater but for 
the financial depression in California, the chief export market. This is evidenced by the fact 
that 44,760 tons of coal actually mined was not sold but added to stock, and the mines had to 
be run on " short time " during the fall months. 

The consumption of coal in that portion of British Columbia served by the Coast Collieries 
shows an increase of 166,935 tons, or 31.4% over last year, indicating an increasing demand 
for fuel in the home market, the local sales this year amounting to 65 % of the total sales. 

On the other hand, the sales for export to the United States show a decrease of 73,517 
tons, or about 17%. The export trade to other countries, while still insignificant, shows an 
increase over the previous year of about 40 %. 

.The production of coke on the Coast is confined to one company, the Wellington Colliery 
Co., which made in 1907 some 16,372 tons of coke from washed screenings ; of this 1,560 tons 
were added to stoek, the sales amounting to 14,812 tons. 

The sales for local consumption in 1907 were 14,592 tons, as against 14,547 tons in 1906 — 
practically no change, but the export sales of coke, which in 1906 amounted to 8,304 tons, in 
1907 were only 220 tons — practically nothing. 



L 20 Report of the Minister of Mixes. 1908 



The coke sales, however, do not give the true condition of the market, as the great demand 
for coal at high prices was such that it was more profitable for the company to sell its coal, as 
such, than to make it into coke, even while a local smelter had to import coke from the Orient, 
as similarly had to be done in Alaska and, presumably, in California. 

Rocky Mountain Coal Field. 

In the Rocky mountain coal field, the western slope of the mountains is in this Province, 
and here there are three separate collieries being worked, viz. : — Michel, Coal Creek, and 
Carbonado collieries — all operated by the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd., although the last 
mentioned colliery has made no production this last year, but is now being opened up again. 

At Hosmer, between Pernie and Michel, interests connected with the C. P. Ry. are 
opening up a large and extensively equipped colliery, which will not ship coal until 1908. 

The only operating company, the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., mined during the year 1907 
some 876,731 tons (2,240 lbs.) of coal, the disposition of which is shown in the following 
table : — 

Sold as coal in Canada 218,221 tons 

,, United States 291,410 ■■ 

Total sold as coal 509,631 

Used by company in making coke 322,870 

Used under company's boilers, etc 44,230 

876,731 tons. 

The amount of coke made from the 322,870 tons of coal used was 206,541 tons (2,240 lbs.), 
of which 5,664 tons were carried over the year as stock, while 200,877 tons were sold as coke, 
140,987 tons for consumption in Canada, and 59,890 tons exported to the United States. 
The production of coke in 1907 shows an increase over the preceding year of 17,156 tons, and 
the sales of coke an increase of 12,831 tons, equally divided between the Canadian and United 
States markets. 

The coke sales of this company would have been considerably greater but that the drop 
in the selling price of copper, followed by a financial depression, caused the large smelters in 
the Boundary District, which obtain their coke supply here, to suspend operations for about 
two months out of the year. The coal and coke production were adversely affected during the 
earlier part of the year by a shortage of cars, and insufficient labour with which to carry on 
the work. 



GOLD. 

The production of placer gold during the year 1907 was about 

Placer Gold. 8828,000, a decrease of 8120,400, or 12.7 %, as compared with the previous 

year. 

The production of placer gold is subject to sudden fluctuations, the discovery of new 

diggings causing a rise, but, as is always the case with this class of mining, a few years sees 

the richer ground worked out and it takes some further years to permit of hydraulic and other 

forms of machine mining becoming established. 

The Atlin District is at present the largest producer of placer gold, contributing nearly 
half of the total Provincial output. Here the larger companies now produce about 70 % of 
the gold recovered, the remaining 30 % being obtained by individual miners, a large propor- 
tion of whose production is obtained from " drifting " operations, which can be carried on in 
winter. In this district royalty was collected on about 8340,000 worth of gold. 



8 Ed. 7 Progress of Mixing. L 21 



The two dredges which were operated for a short time a couple of years ago have been 
now abandoned, it being admitted that, although the ground carried sufficient gold, the 
character of the deposit — a clayey gravel containing large boulders, together with a hard and 
uneven bedrock — rendered the problem a hard one to solve. 

After the difficulties to be experienced with a dredge were realised, a steam shovel was 
established on Tar flats, dredging up the gravel dry and conveying it in cars to an elevated 
washing apparatus, which obviates many of the troubles met with in dredging. This shovel 
has been steadily in operation and is reported to have made a good saving and a large production, 
but neither these figures nor the profit or loss balance can be given. 

The Dease Lake section of the Stikine District has been a disappointment this year 
owing to mishaps to the two companies working there. The individual miner has almost 
disappeared from this once famous camp. 

There is a slight falling off in the gold output of the Cariboo District, but the district has 
fairly maintained its standard of production, some 8350,000 having been recovered this year. 

Fort Steele Division still continues to produce a little placer from the old workings on 
Wild Horse creek. 

The lower Fraser river and the Thompson i-iver have almost ceased to produce gold, the 
dredges established there having been anything but a success. 

The value of the gold produced from lode mining in the Province 
Gold trom Lode during the year 1907 was 84,055,020, a decrease of 8575,619 or about 12.5 %. 

Mining. About 95 % of the gold thus produced is recovered from smelting copper- 

bearing ores. The only stamp-mill of any importance in operation is at 
Hedley, in the Osoyoos Mining Division, which mined and milled about 32,000 tons of ore, 
from which was recovered about 8475,000. 



SILVER. 

The total amount of silver produced in the Province during the year 1907 was 2,745,448 
ounces, valued at 81,703,825, a decrease in amount of 24-1,814 ounces and in value of the 
product of 8193,495. 

About 72 % of the silver produced is found associated with lead, in argentiferous galena, 
the remainder being found in conjunction with copper-bearing ores. 

The Slocan District, including Ainsworth Mining Division, provided 32 % of the total 
Provincial output and Fort Steele Mining Division 30 %, all from argentiferous galena, although 
the output of both these districts is less than it was last year. 



LEAD. 



There was produced in the Province during 1907 about 47,738,703 pounds of lead, having 
a market value of 82,291,458, a decrease, as compared with the preceding year, in amount of 
4,669,514 pounds, and in value of 8376,120. The lead production is derived chiefly from the 
Fort Steele Mining Division, as is shown in the following table : — • 

Fort Steele M. D. produced 37,526,194 &s. of lead = 78.61 % of total. 

Slocan >. .. , 4,305,826 ., 9.00 

Ainsworth n n 3,654,775 n 7.66 n 

Nelson ,. .. 1,582,113 „ 3.32 

All other districts n '669,795 n 1.41 n 

47,738,703 100.00 



L 22 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1908 



COPPER. 

The output of copper for 1907 was 40,832,720 lbs., having a gross value of $8,166,544. 
This output is not quite as great as that of the preceding year, which is to be accounted for by 
the fact that the larger copper-producing mines were only run for about nine months of the year, 
the smelters having been shut down, at least partially, for a month in the spring, owing to a 
shortage of the coke supply, while in the fall the drop in the price of copper, accompanied by 
the financial depression in the East, closed the mines for another two months. For the nine 
months the mines were in operation the output was greater than ever before for a similar period. 

The most serious falling off in production has been in the Coast District, while the greatest 
increase has been made in the Rossland Camp, followed by the Nelson Division, in a lesser 
degree. 

The following table shows the production of the various districts for the years 1905, 1906 
and 1907 :— 



Boundary District 
Rossland n 
Coast & Cassiar n 
Yale-Kamloops m 
Nelson ii 
Other Districts 



1905. 


1906. 


1907. 




.27,670,644 lbs. 

. 5,800,294 „ 

. 3,437,236 ,. 

. 680,808 H 
92,663 „ 
10,606 „ 


32,226,782 lbs. 

4,750,110 ii 

5,431,269 ,. 

355,377 .1 

216,034 m 

10,916 .. 


31,521,550 lbs. 

5,080,275 .. 

3,757,967 ,. 

36,120 „ 

434,222 „ 

2,586 ii 


= 77.2 

12.4 

9.2 

.1 

1.1 

00 





37,692,251 „ 42,990,488 „ 40,832,720 „ 100.00 

The average assays of the copper ores of the various camps, based upon the copper 
recovered, were as follows : — 

Boundary, 1.34 % copper; Coast, 1.99 %, and Rossland, 0.885 % copper. 



Iron Ore. 



OTHER MINERALS. 

There has been practically no iron ore mined in the Province this past 
year, with the exception of some 1,500 tons of bog iron ore mined and 
shipped from Quatsino sound, which deposit having been found unprofitable, 
owing to its shallowness, was then abandoned. From the numerous known deposits of mag- 
netite no ore was shipped, although considerable work, of a prospecting nature, was done. 

The mining of zinc ore has been practically at a standstill. The 

Zinc Ore. Lucky Jim mine, in the Slocan, shipped some 1,120 tons of ore, which had 

been mined during 1906, but no fresh mining was done. Certain mines in 

the Slocan District produced small quantities of zinc blend as concentrates, separated from 

argentiferous galena as a by-product, but this ore has not, as yet, been sold or treated. 

Considerable work has been done on the old Blue Bell mine, opposite Ainsworth, and a 
large quantity of zinc ore developed, for the treatment of which a concentrator is now in 
process of erection. 

The Zinc Smelter erected at Frank, in Alberta, for the treatment of British Columbia 
zinc ores, has not, as yet, been started. 

The Canada Zinc Co., Limited, has begun the building of a small plant at Nelson, 
designed to treat the complex galena-zinc blende ores of the Slocan District by a process of 
electric smelting under the Snyder patents, whereby it is hoped to recover the lead and zinc 
in the metallic state, and also save the silver contents with the lead. The electricity for the 



Ed. 7 Progress of Mining. L 23 



process is to be obtained from Bonnington falls. The tightness of the money market delayed 
the construction of the plant, but the Provincial Legislature, at its 190S session, advanced a 
loan of $10,000 to aid in completing the plant. 

Platinum is known to exist in various parts of the Province, associated 
Platinum. with placer gold in alluvial workings, but it has as yet been mined only as 

a by-product, and as the placer working in these particular districts has this year been slight, 
no appreciable production of platinum has been made. 

The Province abounds in quarry sites from which excellent building 
Building Stone, stone could be obtained, and doubtless will as soon as building in stone 
becomes more general, but at present very little stone is used in the 
Interior, except for special works. On the Coast, building in stone has become more 
general, and several very good quarries of sandstone, granite and andesite have been opened 
up on tide water. In a previous report of this Bureau a detailed description was given of the 
more important quarries. 

The manufacture of red brick is increasing rapidly to supply an 

Brick. increasing demand. Suitable clay deposits are found in all districts, but 

the manufacture on any important scale has been naturally confined to the 

vicinity of the larger towns and cities. For the most part, the output is the product of small 

brick-yards, although two or three larger yards have been established near Vancouver. 

The fire brick plant at Comox, formerly supplied with clay from the 
Fire Brick. Fire adjacent coal mines, has not been worked lately, but the coal mines shipped 
Clay. some 488 tons of fire clay, to be used in the manufacture of pottery. 

At Clavburn, near Vancouver, a very good deposit of fire clay exists, from which a good 
quality of pressed brick and fire brick is being made. 

The Silica Brick and Lime Co. has built and is operating a plant near 
Lime-Silica Brick. Victoria for the manufacture of lime-silica brick. ' The output of the plant 
for the portion of the year 1907 that it has been in operation was, approxi- 
mately, 1,100,000 brick. The brick is of a light gray colour and serves as a front brick, and 
is sold at about 815 a thousand. 

The manufacture of lime is carried on in a small way at a number of 
Lime. points, while at Victoria, on Saanich arm, on Texada island, near Van- 

couver, and elsewhere, are kilns making a considerable output. The 
greater part of the production is made on the Coast, where the limestone deposits are particu- 
larly pure, yielding a lime of exceedingly good quality. 

The only Company actually producing cement in British Columbia is 
Cement. the Vancouver Portland Cement Co., with works at Tod inlet, on the 

Saanich arm, about 13 miles by road from Victoria. The company sold in 
1907 some 143,226 barrels (350 Bis.) of Portland cement, of a total value of 8215,000, of which 
quantity 125,000 barrels were used in the Province. The capacity of the plant now 
constructed and in operation is considerably greater than this output would indicate, as about 
300,000 barrels can be turned out in the year. 

Xo successful, or very serious, attempts have as yet been made in the 

Oil and Oil shales. Province at drilling for petroleum. A railway into the Flathead country 

will, in all probability, be built within a couple of years to certain coal 

fields on the south fork of Michel creek, and, when this is completed, doubtless some serious 

attempt will be made to develop the oil fields believed to exist in that section of the Province. 



L 24 Report of the Minister of. Mixes. 1908 



BUREAU OF MINES. 



"Work of the Year. 

The work of the Bureau of Mines increases, of necessit} T , year by year, and this growing 
activity is due to the following causes : — The extension of the mining area of the Province, 
with the proportional increase in the number of mines ; the increasing desire of the outside 
public for the free information which the Bureau supplies with regard to the various mining 
districts and camps ; and the appreciation by the prospector of the fact that he may obtain, 
gratis, a determination of any rock or mineral which he may send to the Bureau. 

The routine work of the office, and the preparation and publication of the Report for the 
year just ended, followed by the examination in the field of as many of the mines and mining 
districts as the season would permit, together with the work of the Laboratory and instruction 
of students, fully occupied the staff for the year. The staff of the Bureau consists of the 
Provincial Mineralogist, the Provincial Assayer, and a junior assistant in the Laboratory, 
with a clerk as temporary assistant during the publication of the Report. 

After the publication of the Annual Report for the previous year and 

Provincial the finishing of office work, the Provincial Mineralogist started on his 

Mineralogist. summer field-work, going first to visit some properties in the vicinity of 
Ashcroft, and from there continuing south to Highland valley, where a 
number of prospects had been developed showing copper ore. 

From Highland valley a road w r as followed to Nicola valley, where the new coal field was 
examined, a return being made to Victoria on August 4th, in time to, on August 7th, catch 
the steamer " Tees," which runs up the west coast of Vancouver Island to Quatsino sound. 

Here, the various hematite iron locations and a couple of coal prospects were examined, 
after which the trail was taken to Hardy Bay, on the east coast of the island — the dunnage, 
etc., having to be packed across on one's back. 

By arrangement made with the C. P. Railway, prior to leaving Victoria, the steamer 
"Princess Beatrice" called in at Hardy Bay on August 18th, on her trip north, to pick up 
the Provincial Mineralogist and his assistant, Mr. Harold Nation, taking them to Queen 
Charlotte Islands. 

Jedway, on the southern end of Moresby island, one of the Queen Charlotte group, was 
reached on August 21th, at which point the part} T left the steamer, and from there various 
trips were made in a gasoline launch to mineral claims on surrounding bays and islands, 
ending at Skidegate. 

On September 9th, the steamer " Princess Beatrice," then bound southward on her 
succeeding trip, was taken as far as Swanson bay, where the hospitality of Mr. McKinnon w r as 
enjoyed for three days, until the steamer " Camosun " was taken northward to Port Simpson. 

Here another transfer had to be made, and on September 15th the steamer "Princess 
Royal" was taken to Skagway, in Alaska, arriving there on the morning of the 17th. 

Prom Skagway a gasoline launch was taken to Haines, Alaska, from whence a trip was 
made on foot and by canoe, into the Rainy Hollow camp, on the headwaters of the Klehini 
river, in the Atlin Mining Division. 

Returning by the same route, Skagway was reached on September 27th, and on October 
2nd the steamer " Princess Ro}-al " was taken to Victoria, arriving there on October 8th. 



8 Ed. 7 Bureau of Mines. L 25 



In May, and again in December, examinations for Assayers were held in the Government 
Laboratory, Victoria, by the Board of Examiners, appointed under the Act, on which Board 
the Provincial Mineralogist and Provincial Assayer sat as examiners. 

In November the Provincial Mineralogist, under instructions, went to Fernie, East 
Kootenay, to make an examination of and to report on a fissure in the mountain, above the 
coal mines there, which was supposed to threaten a mountain slide, similar to that occurring 
some years ago at Frank, Alberta. 

Subsequently a trip was taken into Greenwood, Grand Forks, Rossland and Nelson. 
Towards the end of the year a Bulletin was prepared, and issued after the new year, on 
the mineral locations on Moresby island, of the Queen Charlotte group. 

The remainder of the season was employed in the preparation for publication of the notes 
taken in the field, the collection and preparation of statistics and the routine work of the 
office, which included, in connection with the various inquiries for information and the collec- 
tion of statistics, the sending out of, approximately, 1,200 letters, with approximately the 
same number received. 

In addition to the work performed in the Assay office, which is noted 
Provincial Assayer. i n a separate report herewith, the Provincial Assayer was detached from 
this Bureau for the summer months and was engaged in making an 
examination of lands in the Alberni district for the Bureau of Information. 



ASSAY OFFICE. 

The following is a summary of the work of the Assay Office of the Bureau for the year 
1907, as reported by the Provincial Assayer, Mr. Herbert Carmichael : — 

During the year 1907 there were made by the staff in the Government Assay Office 905 
assays or quantitative determinations, which is a decrease from the number made during the 
previous year ; of these, a number were for the Bureau of Mines, or for the Department, for 
which no fees were received. The fees collected by the office were as follows : — 

Fees from assays $ 122 00 

n melting and assaying gold dust and bullion 455 00 

ii assayers' examinations 180 00 

Total cash receipts : 81,057 00 

Determinations and examinations made for other Government 

Departments for which no fees were collected 400 00 

Value of assaying done 81,457 00 

The value of gold melted during the year was $63,540, in 84 lots, as against $85,000, in 
117 lots in 1906. 

In addition to the above quantitative work, a large number of quali- 

Free tative determinations, or tests, were made in connection with the identifica- 

Determinations. tion and classification of rocks or minerals sent to the Bureau for a report; 

of these no count was kept, nor were fees charged therefor, as it is the 

established custom of the Bureau to examine and test qualitatively without charge samples of 

mineral sent in from any part of the Province, and to give a report on the same. This has 

been done for the purpose of encouraging the search for new or rare minerals and ores, and to 

assist prospectors and others in the discovery of new mining districts, by enabling them to 

have determined, free of cost, the nature and probable value of any rock they may find. 



L 26 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



In making these free determinations, the Bureau asks that the locality from which the sample 
was obtained be given by the sender, so that the distribution of mineral over the Province 
may be put on record. 

A number of soils, clays and waters have been analyzed. 



EXAMINATIONS FOR ASSAYERS. 

Report of Herbert Carmichael, Secretary of Board of Examiners. 

I have the honour, as Secretary, to submit the Annual Report of the Board of Examiners 
for Certificates of Competency and Licence to Practice Assaying in British Columbia, as 
established under the " Bureau of Mines Act Amendment Act, 1899." 

The Act requires that at least two examinations shall be held each year, and such have 
duly taken place. 

Both these examinations were held in the Government Laboratory at Victoria, each 
occupying a week ; the first examination began on May 27th, and the second on December 
27th, 1907. 

At the first examination the Board consisted of the Provincial Mineralogist, the Provin- 
cial Assayer and Mr. D. E. VVhitaker, Assistant Assayer, and at this examination two 
candidates came up for examination, of which number only one passed the required examina- 
tion. At the December examination the Board consisted of the same examiners, at which two 
candidates stood for examination and both successfully passed. 

The question of holding the fall examination at Nelson was thought of, providing a 
sufficient number of candidates from the Tapper Country entered for the examination. Adver- 
tisements were inserted in the Kootenay papers, giving notice of such intention and calling for 
entries, but no sufficient number applied to justify the considerable additional expense entailed 
by holding an examination away from Victoria. 

In addition to the three candidates mentioned above, who successfully passed the exam- 
inations, the Board recommended during the year the granting of three certificates by 
exemption, under sub-section (2) of section 2 of the Act. In accordance with these 
recommendations, all these six certificates have been duly issued by the Honourable the 
Minister of Mines. 

The following is a list, up to December 31st, 1907, of those to whom Certificates of 
Competency have been issued : — 

List of Assaters holding Provincial Certificates of Efficiency under the 
"Bureau of Mines Act Amendment Act, 1899." 

(Only the holders of such certificates may jwactise assaying in British Columbia.) 

Under section 2, sub-section ( 1 ). 

Austin, John W Britannia Beach, B. C. Collinson, H Ladysmith. 

Baker, C. S. H ( ireenwood. Connie, George H Vancouver, B. C. 

Barke, A. C Greenwood, B. C. Crerar, George 

Belt, Sam'l. Erwin Boundarj- Falls, B. C. Cruickshank, G Rosslaud. 

Bernard, Pierre Monte Christo, Wash. Day, Athelstan Dawson. 

Bishop, Walter Grand Forks. Dedolph, Ed 

Buchanan, James Trail. Dockrill, Walter R Chemainus. 

Campbell, Colin Xew Denver. Dunn, G. W Rosslaud. 

Carmichael, Norman Clifton, Arizona. Fanpihar, J. B Vancouver. 

Church, George B Fingland, John J Sandon. 

Cobeldick, W. M Scotland. Grosvenor, F. E Nelson. 



8 Ed. 7 



Bureau of Mixes. 



L 27 



List of Assayers holding Provincial Certificates of Efficiency. — Concluded. 



Under .section 2, subsection ( 1). — Concluded. 



Hannav, W. H Rossland. 

Hart, P. E Grand Forks. 

Hawkins, Francis. Silverton. 

Hook, A. Ham' 

Hurter, C. S 

John, I) Haileybury, Ont. 

Kiddie, Geo. R Victoria. 

Kitto, Geoffrey B Ladysmith. 

Lang, J. G 

Langlej', A. S Crofton. 

Ley, Richard X Nelson. 

Marsh, Richard Spokane, Wash. 

Marshall, H. Jukes Vancouver. 

Marshall, William S Ladysmith. 

Miles, Arthur D 

Mitchell, Charles T Grand Forks. 

McCormick. Alan F Ruth, Nevada. 

Mar Donald, Alex. C Vancouver. 

McFarlane, James A Kaslo. 

Nirliolls. Frank Norway. 

O'Sullivan, John Vancouver. 

Parker, Robt. H Rossland. 

Parsenow, W. L 

Perkins, Walter G Basin, Montana. 

Richmond, Leigh 

Robertson, T. R 



Rombauer, A. B Butte, Montana. 

Schroeder, Curt. A Hazelton. 

Segsworth, Walter Houghton, Mich. 

Sharpe, Bert N 

Sim, Charles John England. 

Snyder, Blanchard M Greenwood. 

Steven , Wm. Gordon 

Stimmel, B. A Boundary Falls. 

Sundberg, Gustave Mexico City. 

Tally, Robert E Spokane, Wash. 

Thomas, Percival W 

Tretheway, John H Kokanee, B. C. 

Turner, H. A 

Vance, John F. C. B Vancouver. 

Van Agnew, Frank Siberia. 

Wales, Roland T 

Watson, William J Ladysmith. 

Welch, J. Cuthbert 

Wells, Ben T Ladysmith. 

West, Geo. G 

Whittaker, Delbert E Victoria. 

Widdowson, E. Walter Nelson. 

Williams, W. A (hand Forks. 

Williams, Eliot H Nelson. 

Wimberly, S. H 



Under section 2, sub-section ( J. ). 



Archer, Allan 

Browne, D. J Rossland. 

Bryant, Cecil M Vancouver. 

Blaylock, Selwyn G Nelson. 

Caitwright, Cosmo T Vancouver. 

Cavers, Thomas W Rossland. 

Clothier, George A Rossland. 

Cole, Arthur A Cobalt, Out. 

Cole, G. E 

Cole, L. Heber Phcenix. 

Coulthard, R. W Fernie. 

Cowans, Frederick 

Dixon, Howard A Toronto, Ontario. 

Galbraith, M. T 

Gilman, Ellis P Vancouver. 

Green, J. T. Raoul Blairmore. 

Guess, George A Trail. 

Gwillim, J. C Kingston, Ontario. 

Heal, John H 

Hilliary, G. M Idaho, U. S. 

Holdich, Augustus H . England. 

Johnston, William Steele. . . . Lachine, Que. 

Kaye, Alexander Vancouver. 

Kendall, George 

Lay, Douglas Silverton. 

Lewis, Francis B 

Me nit, Charles P 



Musgrave, William N Mexico City. 

Mussen, Horace W Siberia. 

McArthur, Reginald E 

McDiarmid, S. S 

McLellan, John Port Simpson. 

McMurtrv, Gordon 

McNab, J. A Trail. 

Mc Vicar, John 

Maclennan, F. W Rossland. 

Outhett, Christopher Kamloops. 

Pemberton, W. P. D . 

Reid, J. A Greenwood. 

Ritchie, A. B 

Scott, Oswald Norman 

Shannon, S Trout Lake, B. C. 

Sharpe, G. P Midland, Ontario. 

Sloan, David Three Forks, B. C. 

Stevens, F. G Mexico. 

Sullivan, Michael H Trail. 

Sutherland, T. Fraser 

Swinney, Leslie A. E 

Thomson, H. Nellis Anaconda, Montana. 

Watson, A. A Olalla. 

Watson, Henry 

Workman, Ch. W 

Wright, Richard Rossland. 

Wynne, Lewellyn C Hedley. 



Under section 2, sub-section (3). 



Carmichael, Herbert Victoria. 

(Provincial Assayer.) 

Harris, Henry Tasmania. 

Kiddie, Thos Northport, Wash. 

Sutton, W. J Victoria. 



McKillop, Alexander Nelson. 

PellewJJarvey, Wm London, England. 

Robertson, Wm. F Victoria. 

(Provincial Mineralogist.) 
Marshall, Dr. T. R Glasgow, Scotland. 



Previously issued under the "Bureau of Mines Act, 1897," section 12. 



Pinder, W. J. 



.Dawson, Y. T. 



Thompson, James B Vancouver. 



L 28 Report of the Minister of. Mines. 1908 



EXAMINATIONS FOR COAL MINE OFFICIALS. 

During the year 1904, under the "Coal Mines Regulation Act Further Amendment Act, 
1904," the regulations regarding the qualifications and examinations of officials employed in 
coal mines were completely revised and at the same time made much more stringent and 
thorough. 

The " Coal Mines Regulation Act," as now amended, provides that all the officers of a 
coal mining company having any direct charge of work underground, shall hold Government 
Certificates of Competency, which are to be obtained only after passing an examination before 
a duly qualified boaid, appointed for the purpose of holding such examinations, and known as 
the Managers' Board. The certificates granted on the recommendation of such Board, and the 
requirements fur same are as follows : — 

First Class Certificate (or Manager's Certificate). 

Such a certificate must be held by every manager or " chief officer having the control and 
daily supervision of any coal mine " in British Columbia The statutory requirements for this 
certificate, in addition to such examination and qualifications as may be imposed by the Board 
of Examiners are, that the candidate for examination shall be at least 25 } T ears of age, a 
British subject, and have had at least five years' experience in or about the practical working 
of a coal mine. 

Second Class Certificate (or Overman's Certificate). 

Such certificate must be held by any person " who has the daily charge of the underground 
workings of a coal mine under the control and daily supervision of the manager, and next in 
charge under such manager." 

Aside from the requirements of the Board of Examiners, a candidate for such certificate 
must have had " at least five years' experience in or about the practical working of a coal 
mine." 

Third Class Certificate. 

This certificate must be held by every shiftboss, fireboss, or shotlighter in a coal mine in 
British Columbia, and besides the examination by the Board, calls for three years' practical 
experience. 

Experience in a coal mine outside the Province may be accepted by the Board. Any 
certificate is considered to include that of any lower class. 

In addition to the examinations and certificates already specified as coming under the 
Managers' Board, the Act further provides that every coal miner shall be the holder of a 
certificate of competency as such. By " miner " is meant " a person employed underground in 
any coal mine to cut, sheer, break or loosen coal from the solid, whether by hand or machinery." 

Examinations for a miner's certificate are held each month at each colliery by a Board of 
Examiners, known as the Miners' Board, and consisting of an examiner appointed by the owners, 
an examiner elected by the miners of that colliery, and an examiner appointed by the Govern- 
ment. 

Examinations for first, second and third classes w r ere held simultaneously at Fernie, 
Nanaimo and Cumberland, September 17th, 18th and 19th, 1907. 



8 Ed. 7 Bureau of Mixes. L 29 

BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR COAL MINE OFFICIALS. 

First, Second and Third Class Certificates 

Report of Secretary of Board, Francis II. Shepherd. 

I beg to submit tbe annual report, covering the transactions of the above Board, appointed 
under the " Coal Mines Regulation Act." 

Examinations for first, second and third class certificates of competency were held 
September 17th, 18th and 19th, 1907, simultaneously at Nanaimo, Fernie and Cumberland. 

The Appointed Examiners were : — Nanaimo, Messrs. F. H. Shepherd and E. Priest. 
Fernie, Messrs. R. G. Drinnan and John John. Cumberland, Messrs. Charles Graham and 
J. Kesley. 

As the examinations are not held at stated periods, the Board has heretofore been governed 
in the matter of holding examinations by information procured from the several mining centres, 
which would lead the Board to believe that a fair response from intending applicants would 
warrant the Board in fixing the date of the examination and preparing the necessary questions. 

The experience of the Board a few years ago was that semi-annual examinations, while 
meeting the demand and requirements of third class candidates, did not command a sufficient 
response from candidates for the two higher classes. The expense entailed in preparing for 
and holding examinations for the three classes simultaneously was not proportionately in 
excess for holding examinations for second and third class certificates only, therefore the 
Board decided to return to the original plan of holding them for all classes simultaneously. 

The further experience of the Board is that annual examinations create an accumulation 
of candidates which renders the work of scrutiny and appraisement a long and tedious duty, 
especially as the appointed examiners have private avocations which cannot be neglected. It 
also imposes a long and unjust delay upon the candidate, and may, as it did previously to the 
last examination, cause a shortage in the necessary qualified officials to supply the demand of 
the operators. It is the intention, therefore, of the Board to hold examinations in the future 
at more frequent intervals, and in view of the rapidly increasing development of the coal 
mining industry, the return to the semi-annual plan will receive the consideration of the Board 
at its next general meeting. 

In view of the opening of mines at Nicola, and the attendant expense incurred by the 
candidates from that District, having to travel to Nanaimo to attend the examinations, the 
question of holding an examination at that place will also receive the consideration of the 
Board, and under the proposed changes mentioned by the Hon. the Premier recently in the 
Legislature in reference to the increase in the number of Coal Mine Inspectors, who are con- 
sidered ex-officio Assistant Examiners by the Board, I venture to hope that the Board will 
extend this relief to intending candidates from this new and important district. 

The number of candidates at the recent examination was unprecedented in the coal mining 
history of the Province, there being 56 candidates applying for examination. The number of 
successful candidates was also unusual, no less than 52 being successful and passing by good 
percentages. 

Class. No. Passed. 

First 10 7 

Second 19 19 

Third] 27 26 

It might appear from the above that the unusually high percentage of successful candi- 
dates was probably due to a lowering of the standard heretofore maintained by the Board, but 



L 30 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1908 



this is not the case, as the published questions show, and the result is probably due to two 
reasons : — 

(1.) The practice of the Board in publishing the questions after each examination has had 
the effect of educating intending candidates up to the high standard set by the Board. 

(2.) The papers submitted to the candidates were of a more practical character than 
those hitherto prepared, and at the same time the high standard aimed at by the Board has 
been maintained, tending to secure safe and efficient mine officials, both from a theoretical 
and practical standpoint. 

This change was the result of the careful and serious consideration of the Board, and was 
suggested by the very practical' character of the British examinations, where the loss of life 
in mining operations is proportionately much lower than in our own Province, and it was 
therefore decided to reduce the number of strictly theoretical questions and substitute 
questions which required practical experience to successfully answer. 

The ability to memorise formula?, for examination purposes only, does not necessarily 
prove the candidate to be the competent mine official, and, on the other hand, the duties 
devolving upon the mine officials of the higher classes requires a certain amount of technical 
education, and the ability to apply, but not necessarily to memorise, the mass of formula? 
incident to the science and practice of mining. 

With the above precedent to guide it, the Board feels secui-e in the opinion that the 
change will admit to the various responsible positions in connection with the industry a class 
of officials which will tend to greater safety and the reduction of loss of life and personal 
injury in the coal mines of the Province. 

I append hereto a list of the candidates who successfully passed the Examinations, of the 
various classes, held during the past year. 

The Board of Appointment of Examiners consists of : Messrs. Andrew Bryden, Lady- 
smith, Chairman ; Tully Boyce, Nanaimo, Vice-Chairman ; T. R. Stockett, George Williams, 
and A. Dick, Nanaimo ; R. G Drinnan and John John, Fernie ; F. H. Shepherd, Nanaimo, 
Secretary. The office of the Board is in the Provincial Court House building, at Nanaimo. 

I have, etc., 

Francis H. Shepherd, 

Secretary to the Board. 



List of Successful Candidates. Examinations held September 17th, 18th and 

19th, 1907. 

First Class Certificates. 



Name. 



Date. 



No. 



Graham, Thomas. . 
Darbyshire, James 
Jackson, Thos. R . 
Emmerson, Jos . . . 
Evans, Evan . . . . 
Keith, Thomas. . . . 
Elliott, Daniel 



Filled and issued from Mines 
Department, Victoria, Nov. 
3rd, 19U7. 



8 Ed. 7 



Bureau of Mines. 



L 31 



Biggs, John G 

Russell, Daniel . . . 

Bastian, John 

Morgan, John 

Devlin, Henry 

Freeman, Harry N . 
Spruston, Thos. A . . 

Russell, John 

White, John 

Parnham, Charles . . 
Lancaster, William 

Saville, Luther 

Ovington, John . . . 

Daniels, Davicl 

Vanhulls, Peter. . . . 

Monks, James 

Stoekwell, William. 
Richards, Thomas . . 
David, James 



Second Class Certificates. 



Name. 




Third Class Certificates. 



Name. 



Malone, Patrick . . . 

Dykes, Jos. W 

Richards, James . . . 
Francis James . . 

.Saville, E. 

Almond, Aleck 
Ratclifle, Thomas . 

Lane, Joseph 

Sparkes, Erlward . . . 
Jarrett, Fred. J . . . . 
Raynor, Fred . . 
Johnson, Moses 
Matusky, Andrew.. 

Wallaee, Fred 

Shooter, Joseph 
Wilson, William . . 
Nelson, Horatio . . . 
Bush ell, James P . . 
Cunliffe, Thomns. . . 
Birchall, Richard . 
Thompson, Thomas 
Thompson, Joseph . 

Marsh, Jonn 

Smith, Thomas J . . 
Wilson, Thomas M . 
Thomas, Warriett . . 




Memo. — No. 268 was spoiled and cancelled. 



L 32 



Report of the Minister op Mines. 



1908 



Registered List of Holders of Certificates of Competency as 

Coal Mine Officials. 



First Class Certificates. — Service Certificates Issued under Section 39, " Coal 

Mines Regulation Act, 1877." 



John Bryden, Victoria. 
Edward G. Prior. 
Thomas A. Buckley. 



Archibald Dick, Government Inspector of Mines. 
James l>unsmuir, Victoria. 
James Cairns, Comox, Farmer. 



First Class Certificates of Competency Issued under "Coal Mines 
Regulation Act, 1897." 



Name. 



Shepherd, Francis H . . . 

Gibson, Richard 

Honobin, William 

Little, Francis D 

Martell, Joshua 

Chandler, William 

Priest, Elijah 

McGregor, James 

Randle, Joseph 

Matthews, John 

Norton, Richard Henry 

Bryden, Andrew 

Russell, Thomas 

.Sharp, Alexander 

Kesley, John 

Wall, William H 

Morgan, Thomas 

Wilson, David 

Smith, Frank B 

Bradshaw, George B . . . 
Simpson, William G. . . . 

Hargreaves, James 

Drinnan Robert G 

Browitt, Benjamin 

Stockett, Thomas, Jr . . 

Pearson, Robert 

Cunliffe, John 

Evans, Daniel 

McEvoy, James 

Wilson, A. R 

Siniister, Charles 

Colville, Andrew 

Budge, Thomas 

Mills, Thomas 

Faulds, Alexander 

Richards, James A . 

McLean, Donald 

Wilkinson, Geo 

Wright, H. B 

Coulthard, R. W 

Roaf, J. Richardson . . . 

John, John 

Manlev, H. L 



Date. 



March 
May 

December 



January 



August 

December 

April 

October 

March 

May 



June 



February 
August 

October 



January 



5th, 
5th, 

1st, 

1st, 

1st, 

21st, 

21st, 

18th, 

18th, 

8th, 

2lith, 

30th, 

20th, 

27th, 

4th, 

30th, 

30th, 

30th, 

30th, 

12th, 

12th, 

5th, 

5th, 

3rd, 

3rd, 

3rd, 

3rd, 

3rd, 

17th, 

17th, 

17th, 

17th, 

17th, 

17th, 

17th, 

17th, 

21st, 

21st, 

21st, 

21st, 

21st, 

21st, 

21st, 



1881 

1882 

II 

1883 
1888 
1889 

II 

1891 

1892 
1896 

II 

1899 
1901 



1892 



1905 




fV,d. Kuu, - 

7' 



\ i 






\ 



8 Ed. 7 



Bureau of Mines. 



L 33 



First Class Certificates Issued under " Coal Mines Regulation Act Further 

Amendment Act, 1904." 



Name. 



Darbyshire, James 

Elliott, Daniel 

Emmerson, Joseph 

Evans, Evan 

France, Thos 

Fraser, Norman . . 
Graham, Charles. . 
Graham, Thomas . 
Heathcote, Elijah. 
Jackson. Thos. R. 
Keith, Thomas . . . 
Millar, John K . . . 
Strachan, Robert . 

Shaw, Alex 

Williams, Thos. H 



Date. 



November 9th, 


1907. 


9th, 


n 


n 9th, 


„ 


9th, 


„ 


22nd, 


1906. 


March 4th, 


1905. 


November 14th, 


„ 


9th, 


1907. 


March 4th, 


1905. 


November 9th, 


1907. 


9th. 


„ 


22nd, 


1906. 


March 4th, 


1905. 


November 14th, 


„ 


22nd, 


1906. 



Second Class Certificate of Service. 



Name. 



Corkhill, Thomas 

Morton, T. R 

Loe, John S 

Millar, J. K 

McCliment, John 

Martin, David 

Hunt, John 

Walker, David 

Short, Richard 

Powell, William Baden 

Sharp, James 

Bryden, Alexander. . . 



Date. 



March 4th, 1905.... 


B 7 


,, 4th, ,, . 




B 8 




4th, „ . 




B 9 




4th, » . 




B 10 




4th, „ . 




B 11 




4th, „ . 




B 12 




, • 4th, r, . 




B 13 




4th, „ . 




B 14 




4th, » . 




B 15 




, 4th, » . 




B 16 




18th, » . 




B17 




4th, « . 




B 18 



Cer. No. 



Second Class Certificates of Competency Issued under "Coal Mines Regulation 
Act Further Amendment Act, 1904." 



Name. 




Barclay, Andrew . . 

Bastian, John 

Biggs, John G 

Bridge, Edward 

Brown, John C 

Canfield, Bernard . . 

Daniels. David 

Darbyshire, James . 

Devlin, Henry 

Dunsmuir, John . . . 

Evans, Evan 

Finlayson, James . 

France, Thos 

Freeman, Henry N. 
< rillespie, Hugh. . . . 
Gillespie, John .... 

Graham, Chas 

Jackson, Thos. R . . 



July 
November 



October 



November 
October 

November 

March 

July 

November 



July 

October 

March 



29th, 

2nd, 

2nd, 

23rd, 

23rd, 

23rd, 

2nd, 

23rd, 

2nd, 

14th, 

11th, 

29th, 

14th, 

2nd, 

29th, 

23rd, 

4th, 

4th, 



1905 

1907 

1906 

1906 
1907 
1906 
1907 
1905 
1905 



1007 
1905 

1906 
1905 



Cer. No. 



B25 
B42 
B40 
B33 
B39 
B30 
B53 
B 32 
B44 
B26 
B 2 
B21 
B27 
B45 
B 24 
B36 
B 1 
B 5 



L 34 



Kepoet of the Minister of Mines. 



1908 



Second Class Certificates of Competency Issued under " Coal Mines Regulation 
Act Further Amendment Act, 1904."' — Concluded. 



Name. 



James. David November 2nd, 1907 

Jones, Wm July 29th, 1905 

Lancaster, William November '2nd, 1907 

Lockhart, William October 23rd, 1906 

McGuckie, Thomas M „ 23rd, « 

McKinnel, David „ 23rd, » 

Monks, James November 2nd, 1907 

Morgan. John „ 2nd, u 

Nellist, David March 4th, 1905 

Newton, John October 23rd, 1906 

Ovington, John November 2nd, 19U7 

Parnharu, Charles // 2nd, « 

Reid, Thomas July 29th, 1905- 

Richards, Thomas November 2nd, 1907 

Rigby. John July 29th, 1905 

Russell, Daniel November 2nd, 1907 

Russell, John » 2nd, « 

Saville, Luther , November 2nd, 1907 

Shaw. Alex July 29th, 1905 

Somerville, Alex March 4th, n 

Spruston, Thos. A November 2nd, 1907 

Stockwell. William » 2nd, « 

Thomas, Joseph D October 23rd, 1906 

Vanhulle, Peter November 2nd, 1907 

Watson, Adam G „ 14th, 1905 

Webber, John Frank March 4th, 1905 

White, John November 2nd, 1907 

Wyllie, John B July 29th, 1905 



Date. 



Cer. No. 



B58 
B20 
B50 
B 34 
B35 
B37 
B55 
B43 
B 6 
B31 
B52 
B49 
B23 
B57 
B29 
B41 
B47 
B51 
B 19 
B 4 
B46 
B56 
B38 
B54 
B28 
B 3 
B4S 
B22 



Third Class Certificates Issued under "Coal Mines Regulation Act Further 

Amendment Act. 1904." 



Name. 



Almond, Alex 

Biggs, John 

Birchell, Richard 

Bridge, Edward 

Bushnell, Jas. P 

Catchpall, Charles . . . 

Cooke, Joseph 

Crawford, David 

Cunningham, G. F . . . 

Cunliffe, Thos 

Devlin, Edward 

Donej', John 

Douglas, D. B 

Dykes, Joseph W . 

Francis, James 

Freeman. H. G 

Hodson, R. H 

Hutchison, Ben ..... 

Jarrett, Fred. J 

Jemson, J. W 

Johnson, Moses 

Jones, W. T 

Lancaster, William . 

Lane, Joseph 

Liddle, John 

Malone, Patrick 

Mattishaw, Samuel K 
Marsh, John 




October 

March 

October 

July 

October 

July 

March, 

// 
November 
October 

a 
March, 
October 



November 

March 

November 

October 

March 

October 

March 

October 

July 
October 



1st, 

4tn, 

1st. 
29th, 

1st, 
29th, 

4th, 

4th, 
11th, 

1st, 

23rd, 

4th, 

23rd, 

1st, 

1st, 

14th, 

4th, 

14th, 

1st, 
4th, 

1st, 

4th, 

23rd, 

1st, 
29th, 

1st, 
23rd, 

1st, 



1907 
1905 
1907 
1905 
1907 
1905 



1907 
1905 

1906 
1907 

1905 



1907 
1905 
1907 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1905 
1907 
1906 
1907 



Cer. No. 



C 252 
C 210 
C266 
C 223 
C264 
C227 
C 209 
C 208 
C 229 
C265 
C241 
C211 
C235 
C 248 
C250 
C230 
C 216 
C 232 
C 256 
C 205 
C258 
C221 
C243 
C254 
C '228 
C247 
C237 
C270 



8 Ed. 7 



Bureau of Mines. 



L 35 



Third Class Certificates Issued under "Coal Mixes Regulation Act Further 
Amendment Act, 1904." — Concluded. 



Name. 




Matusky, Andrew. . . 
Mc Alpine, John . . . . 
McGuckie, Thomas. . 
McLellan, William . . 
Merrifieldr, George . . 
Merrifield, William . 

Monks, James 

Moore. George 

Morgan, John 

Nelson, Horatio 

Perry, James 

Plank. Samuel 

Rateliffe. Thomas . . . 

Raynor, Fred. 

Richards, James 
Richards. Samuel . . . 

Rigbv, John 

SaviUe, E. O 

Shooter, Joseph . 

Smith. Joseph 

Smith, Thos. J 

Sparkes, Edward . . . 
Spruston, Thomas A 
Stewart. James M. . . 
Stockwell, William . 
Taylor, Charles M . . 
Thomas, John B . . . . 
Thomas, Joseph 
Thomas, Warriett. . . 
Thompson, Thomas . 
Thompson, Joseph . . 
Thomson, Duncan . . 

Wallace, Fred 

Watson, Adam G . . . 
Watson, William . . . 

Weeks, John 

White. John ....... 

Wilson, Thomas 
Wilson, William. . . . 

Wintle, Thomas A . 



October 

March 
July 
March 
October 

November 

October 

July 

( Jctober 

March 

November 

October 



July 
October 

March 
October, 

March 
October 

March 

November 

March 

October 



March 

March 

March 
October 



July 



1st 

4th 

29th 

4th 

23rd 

23rd 

14th 

23rd 

29th 

1st 

4th 

14th 

1st 

1st 

1st 
23rd 
29th 

1st 

1st 

4th 

1st 

1st 

4th 

23rd 

23rd 

4th 

14th 

4th 

1st 

1st 

1st 

4th 

1st 

4th 

22nd 

4th 

22rd 

1st 

1st 

29th 



1907 
1905 



190G 

1905 
191 6 
1905 
1907 

1905 

1907 



1906 
1905 

l!in7 

1905 
1907 

1905 
1906 

1905 



1907 



1905 

1907 
1905 
1906 
1905 
1906 
1907 

1905 



Cer. No. 



C 259 
C217 
C 226 
C219 
C239 
C 236 
C 234 
C 242 
C 224 
C 203 
C 215 
C 233 
C 253 
( ' 257 
C249 
C 244 
C 225 
C251 
C 261 
( ■ 21 17 
C271 
( ' 255 
C 206 
C240 
C23S 
C 213 
C 231 
( • 221 ! 

C 273 
C267 
I 269 
C 218 

C260 
C212 

C246 
C 214 
( ■ 245 
( ' 272 
C 262 
C 222 



L 36 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1908 



COAL MINE OFFICIALS. 

Third class certificates issued under " Coal Mines Regulation Act Further Amendment Act, 
1904," sec. 38, s.-s. 2, in exchange for certificates issued under the "Coal Mines Regu- 
lation Act Amendment Act, 1901." 



Name. 



Adam, Robert 

Addison, Thos 

Aitken, James 

Alexander, Wra .... 

Allsop, Harry 

Ashman, Jabez 

Aughinvole, Alex . . . 
Barclay, Andrew . . . 

Barclay, James 

Barclay, John 

Berry, James 

Bickle, Thos 

Biggs, Henry 

Black, JohnS 

Bowie, James 

Briscoe, Edward .... 

Campbell, Dan 

Carr, Jos. E 

Carroll, Harry 

Clarkson, Alexander 
Collishaw, John .... 

Comb, John 

( losier, Wm 

Courtney, A. W . 

Crawford, Frank . . . 

Daniels, David 

Davidson, David. . . . 

Davidson, John 

Devlin, Henry 

Dobbie, John 

Dudley, James 

Duncan, Thomas. . . . 

Dunlap, Henry 

Dunn, Geo 

Dunsmuir, John .... 

Eccleston, Wm 

Evans, Evan 

Evans, W. H 

Fagan, David 

Farmer, Bernard . . . 
Farquharson, John. . 
Findlayson, James . . 
Fulton, Hugh T 

< ribson, Edward .... 
Gilchrist, Wm 

< rillespie, Hugh .... 

Gillespie, John 

( tould, Alfred 

< S-reen, Francis 

Handlen. Jas 

Harmison, Wm 

Haworth, Geo 

Hescott, John 

Hutchison, Archie . . 

John, David 

Johnson, Geo 

Johnson, Wm. R . . . 

Kerr, Wm 

Lander, Frank 

Landfear, Herbert . . 

Lewis, Thos 

Loekhart, Wm 

Malpass, James . . . 



Date. 



12, 
10, 
24, 

IT, 
11, 



11 

II, 
10, 
3, 
13, 
10, 



Oct. 
Dec 
Oct, 
Feb 
Oct. 
Feb. 5, 
March -2!), 
April 27, 
April 27, 
April 17, 
Feb. 
Oct. 
April 
April 
May 
Oct. 
March 29, 
Oct, 11, 
March 29, 
April 27, 
Feb. 7, 
March 23, 
March 29, 
Nov. 2, 
April 6, 
April 27, 
April 3, 
March 29, 
Oct. 12, 
Nov. 27, 
March 22, 
Aug. 29, 
Nov. 21, 
Dec. 19, 
March 29, 
March 15, 
March 13, 
March 14, 
April G, 
Jan. 
April 
June 
April 
May 
March 29, 
April 0, 
April 
April 17 
Oct/ 11, 
June 
Feb. 
March 29, 
Jan. 16, 
Sept. 8, 
Nov. 8, 
May 9, 
March 1 , 
March 29, 
Jan. 9. 
Jan. 27, 
Oct. 
Jan. 
Nov. 



31, 

27, 

6, 

3, 

30, 



(i. 



16, 
3, 



11, 
6, 



1904 
1904 
1904 
1905 
19114 
1907 
1905 
1904 
1904 
1905 
1905 
J 904 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1906 
1905 
1904 
1905 
1904 
1905 
1904 
1905 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1905 
1905 
1904 
1905 
1905 
1906 
1904 
1904 
1905 
1905 
1905 
19115 
1905 
1905 
1904 
1904 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1904 
1904 
1906 
1904 
1904 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1904 
1904 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1904 
1905 
1904 



Certifi- 
cate No. 



42 
52 

H 
72 
34 



C 131 
C 89 
C 19 
C 20 
C 111 
C 70 
C 37 
C 110 
C 108 
C 116 
C 129 
93 



C 
C 

C 

c 
c 
c 
c 
c 

C 7 
C 12 
C 106 
C 87 
C 41 
C 126 
C 114 
C 128 
C 51 



56 
90 

80 

78 
70 



C 109 
C 64 
C 17 
C 25 
C 105 
C 118 
C 85 
C 8 
C 5 
C112 
C 38 
C 122 
C 65 
C 88 
C 62 
C 123 
C 49 
C 124 
C 75 



01 
61 
63 
35 
60 



C 113 



Name. 



Marsden, John 
Marshall, Howard . 
Matthews, Chas . . . 
Miard, Harry E . . . 
Middleton, Robt.. . 

Miles, Thos 

Miller, Thos. K . . 
McKenzie, John R. 
McKinnell, David . 
McKinnon, Arch'd. 
McMillan, Peter... 
McMillan, Henry . . 
McMurtrie, John . . 
Moore, Wm. H. . . 

Morris, John 

Myles, Walter 

Nash, Isaac 

Neave, Wm 

Nellist, David 

Nelson, James 

Newton, John 

Ximmo, Jas. P . . . . 

O'Brien, Geo 

Pengelly, Richard . 

Perrie, Jas 

Perry, James 

Pounder, Geo 

Price, Jas 

Rafter, Wm 

Reid, Thos 

Reid, James 

Reid, Wm 

Richards, Thos 

Ross, John 

Roughead, George . 

Ryan, John 

Sanders, John W . . 
Shenton, Thos. J . . 
Shepherd, Henry . . 
Smith, Ralph . .... 

Smith, Geo 

Somerville, Alex . . . 

Stauss, Chas. F 

Steele, Jas . 



May 3 
Dec. 6 

April 27 
March 3 
Feb. 11 
Aug. 10 
Feb. 21 
Oct. 12 
March 29 
April, 3 
March 29 
May 13 
March 29 
June 17 
Dec. 27 
April 3 
June 1 
Oct. 12 
April 27 
April 27 
Oct, 12 
April 3 
Feb. 6 
Dec. 27 
March 15 
June 13 
Oct. 16 
Nov. 8 
March 29 
Nov. 3 
March 23 
Dec. 15 
April 27 
April 
Jan. 
Dec. 
April 
July 
June 
March 7 
March 29 
March 24 
Feb. 9 
March 29 
Stewart, Duncan H 'March 28 



Date. 



Stewart, John 

Stewart, Daniel W. 
Stoddart, Jacob . . 
Strachan, Robt 
Strang, James 
Thomas, John . . . 
Tunstall, James . . . 

Vass, Robt 

Vater, Charles 

Walk em, Thos 

Webber, Chas 

Webber, Charles F . 
Whiting, Geo ... . 
Wilson, Austin. . . 

Wilson, Thos 

Woodburn, Moses . 
Yarrow, Geo 



April 3 
May 16 
Feb. 21 
April 27 
April 27 
March 29 
June 15 
Dec. 
April 
Dec. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
May 
Feb. 
April 
March 29 
Nov. 3 



1904 
1905 
1904 
1 905 
1905 
1904 
1905 
1904 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1904 
1905 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1905 
1905 
1904 
1905 
1904 
1905 
1904 
1905 
1904 
1904 
1901 
1904 
1905 
1907 
1904 
1905 
1904 
1904 
1905 
1905 
1904 
1905 
1905 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1905 
1904 
1904 
1905 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1905 
1905 
1904 
1905 
1904 



Certifi- 
cate No. 



C 21 
C127 
C 9 



76 
71 
31 

74 



C 40 
C 99 
C 102 
C 94 
C 115 
C 96 
C 119 
C 57 
C 100 
C 120 
C 43 
C 13 
C 16 
C 39 
C 103 
C 66 
C 58 
C 81 
C 27 
C 125 
C 50 



'.15 

47 

1 

54 

14 



C 101 
C 130 
C 59 
C 107 
C 30 
C 26 
C 77 
C 84 
C 3 
C 69 
C 92 
C 4 
C 104 
C 23 
C 73 
C 15 
C 10 
C 97 
C 121 
C 53 



66 

55 

32 



C 33 
C117 
C 67 
C 11 
C S3 
C 46 



8 Ed. 7 Cariboo District. L 37 



CARIBOO DISTRICT. 



CARIBOO* AND QUESNEL MINING DIVISIONS. 
Report by George Walker, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit herewith my report on mining operations in Cariboo District 
during the year 1907. 

I am pleased to announce a slight increase in the gold output of the district for the past 
year. This is occasioned by the favourable and wet season for the hydraulic mines, from which 
the greater part of the gold is produced. I think that the district is on the eve of a prosperous 
term, from the fact that the revenue of the district is larger than any previous year, and more 
prospecting has been done than for some years past. The building of the Grand Trunk 
Pacific Railway through the northern portion of the district will open to the prospector and 
capitalist a vast area of new country, which, up to the present time, has been forced to lie 
idle and almost unexplored, owing to its isolation and the almost prohibitive cost of getting in 
supplies and machinery. 

Coal has been discovered and located on Bear river, about 15 miles from the Fraser river, 
and the seams are reported to be large and the quality good. 



QUESNEL MIXING DIVISION. 

Of this portion of the district I regret my inability to speak with any degree of certainty, 
not having received reports from the various mine managers, but the report of the Mining 
Recorder of the division will be found to contain more definite information. 



THE CARIBOO MINING DIVISION.* 

In the Cariboo, or what is locally known as the Barkerville Mining Division of Cariboo 
District, the result of the season's operations has been fairly good, and shows a slight increase 
over that of the previous year. 



* The boundaries of this Mining Division have been somewhat altered 1)}- an Order in Council gazetted 
May 3rd, 1906, a copy of which is as follows : — 

"Starting on the eastern boundary of the Province at a point where such boundary cuts the southern 
boundary of the watershed of the Peace river and its tributaries ; thence proceeding westerly and southerly 
along the height of land separating the drainage area of the Fraser river and its tributaries on the south from 
the drainage area of the Peace river and its tributaries on the north, continuing to and crossing the Salmon 
river at a point about five miles from where the said Salmon river empties into the Fraser river; thence 
westerly along the height of land separating the drainage area of the Fraser river below this point and of 
Xechako river below the junction of the Stuart, on the south, from the drainage area of the Stuart and 
Salmon rivers on the north, to the mouth of the Stuart river and crossing of the Xechako river ; thence 
southerly and westerly along the height of land forming the boundary between the watershed of the 
Xechako river above the Stuart on the north and the Chilako (Mud) river and Black water on the south and 
east to a point on such height of land where it intersects the height of land separating the watersheds of the 
Euchiniko river on the north and upper Blackwater on the south ; thence easterly along such divide to a 
crossing of the Blackwater at the junction of the Xazco river: thence easterly along the height of land 
between West river and Baker's creek to a crossing of the Fraser at a point half-way between mouths of 
West and Quesnel rivers ; thence easterly following height of land dividing the drainage area of the Quesnel 
river and tributaries on the south from the drainage area of the Willow and Cottonwood rivers on the north, 
to a point where such height of land intersects the height of land dividing the drainage area of the south 
fork of the Upper Fraser from the drainage area of the Canoe river ; thence south-east along such divide to 
the eastern boundary of the Province; thence northerly along such eastern boundary to the point of 
commencement. " 



L 38 Report of the Minister of- Mines. 1908 



Williams Creek and Tributaries. 

I am favoured with the following report from John Hopp, owner of the Mucho Oro claim 
on Stouts gulch. 

"At the Mucho Oro claim we employ from 15 to 30 men during the hydraulic season, using 

approximately 2,000 miner's inches of water under 325 feet pressure, and the plant consists of 

main pipe line, 18 inches in diameter, using a No. 6 monitor. During the season of 1907 

300,000 cubic yards were moved. The result of the season's operations was very satisfactory." 

Regarding this property Mr. John Hopp, the owner, writes me as 

Forest Rose follows: — "During the working season we employ from 8 to 15 men. 

Hydraulic Claim. This past season we had a supply of about 200 to 300 inches of water, with 

a plant consisting of 7-inch and 8-inch pipe-line. About 15,000 yards of 

gravel were handled at this mine. After testing the gravel, we decided to instal a larger 

plant, and increased the ditch and flumes to a carrying capacity of about 1,500 to 2,000 inches 

of water and installed a 15-inch pipe-line with a No. 4 giant, which will very materially 

increase the capacity of the mine. The result of the season's operation was very satisfactory." 

Lowhee Creek. 

Of this property Mr. Hopp, the owner, says : — "On the Lowhee property from 12 to 20 
men were employed during the season just passed, the water supply being about 800 inches, 
under a head of 210 feet, using 15 and 11-inch pipe-line with a No. 2 giant. Approximately, 
50,000 yards of gravel were moved. The result of the season's operations was very satisfactory, 
and it is my intention next season to increase the size of the ditches and plant of this property 
to a capacity of 2,000. miner's inches of water, and also to construct a reservoir in connection 
with the property on Ella lake, which will very materially increase the capacity and also 
lengthen the time for hydraulicing." 

Lightning Creek and Tributaries. 

I am indebted to the President and Manager of the Lightning Creek Gold Gravels & 
Drainage Company, Mr. C. H. Unverzagt, for the following report : — 

" The season's operations closed on the 1st October, due to a ' run ' caused by a ' breaking 
through ' into the gravel from the branch drift, the underground work being at that time nearly 
completed. The drifts, however, became filled up, and after a month spent in cleaning out 
the same, it was found that the plunger pumps required so much attention, owing to chocking 
up of the valves by fine sand, that it was deemed best to discontinue operations and tempor- 
arily place in the shaft a new style of pump operating without the use of valves, and there- 
for operations were closed until the ensuing April. 

" During the year a fair amount of additional machine shop equipment was installed and, 
besides the underground work done, a large timber shed was erected at one end of the works 
and a similar large lumber platform erected at the other. The property is well equipped for 
the operation of drift mining, and there is a large amount of material and supplies on hand. 
It has been closed in condition to resume work at a moment's notice. 

" It is the intention of the management to dispense with the Cornish pumps which they 
had in the operations, and, for the purpose of sinking or of cleaning out any runs, to use a 
screw-propeller or valveless pump, w T hich will be first installed in the ensuing spring for 
cleaning out the shaft. In addition to that, 150 H.P. turbine wheel and air compressor will 
be installed in the old shaft-house to give additional power, as well as to save the expense 
incident to the use of steam. A small locomotive will be added for yard purposes and trackage 
up and down the stream. It is the intention to sink a shaft directly into gravel, on the 



8 Ed. 7 Cariboo District. L 39 



opposite side of the creek to the present shaft-house, and also about 3,000 feet up-stream, to an 
intermediate strata which the drilling has shown up rich, in order to have the property 
producing at two points at about the same time. 

" In order to offset the difficulty of going through a strata of wet slum at the present 
point, an improved Chicago piling, especially adapted for quicksands, will be used. The 
company has been promised the co-operation of some of the ablest miners in Cariboo, in order 
to put the property in a going shape without any further delays or mishaps after the spring 
opening. After the installation of the air plant, the property will then be provided with 
compressed air, steam and water power for various purposes. Steam, however, is only to be 
used in an emergency, it being the intention to substitute compressed air for its several uses 
and thus save fuel expenses. 

" The location of the work gives plenty of fall without the necessity of carrying water 
over 3,000 feet. At the present time, 2,000 feet gives a little over 20 feet fall." 

The Cariboo Consolidated Company, Limited, which has been operating 
La Fontaine Mine, this mine for several years developing the deep channel of Lightning creek, 
closed down in the early spring, owing to financial difficulties. 

Peters Creek. 

J. G. Mathers, whose concessions are situated near the mouth of this creek, has steadily 
continued work for the whole season, and I am informed that some good pay has been taken 
out. 

A local company has been formed to prospect and develop the deep ground on this creek 
above J. Gr. Mathers' concession. This company is at present engaged in building houses, 
etc., and getting everything in readiness to commence the sinking of the shaft to bed-rock. 

Wormald Creek. 

The Worrnald Creek Mining Company, after sinking the shaft to a depth of 80 feet by 
means of a bucket and windlass, was driven out by water. It is the intention of this 
company to instal an over-shot water-wheel and pump to reach the bottom gravels of this 
creek. 

Slough Creek. 

Mr. "Walter B. Hill, acting manager in charge of the Slough Creek, Limited, says : — 
"In January last received and installed two new large boilers and a direct-acting hoisting 
engine, with two water buckets, each capable of hoisting 500 gallons of water, but reduced to 
300 gallons at each lift. Work underground consisted of extending various drives and boring 
holes in roof of same, for the purpose of tapping the water. A new and extensive scheme is 
under consideration for the purpose of supplying power for a much increased plant, to be 
driven by electricity, generated by water power. Owing to the greatly increased consumption 
of fuel and the } T early additional cost and difficulty of procuring same, it was found to be 
absolutely necessary to find means, other than by steam, for unwateriug the mine ; so early in 
August, it was decided to close clown and proceed with the construction of the aforementioned 
electrical plant, for which preliminary surveys have been taken and other necessary initial 

work has been done." 

Willow River. 

The Willow River Mining Company, Limited, continued work for the greater part of the 
winter season, but during the spring freshet was compelled to shut down until the freshet 
was over. Work was then commenced, but the breaking of the main shaft of the wheel, by 
which the pumps are run, caused another delay in developing the deep channel of Willow 



L 40 Report of the Minister of Mixes. 1908 

river. From the work done on this mine during the winter satisfactory results were obtained. 
At the present writing a bedrock tunnel some ten feet from the bottom of the shaft is being 
run to tap the channel. 

Mosquito Creek. 

The Alabama and Williams hydraulic claims have kept up their reputations as prolific 
gold producers during the past season, having had an extra water supply. 

Eight-Mile Lake. 
The Thistle Gold Company, operating at Eight-Mile lake, owing to the wet season, were 
enabled to pipe the greater part of the season, the result of which is very satisfactory. A 
bank blast was put in this fall, thereby loosening a large quantity of gravel, which will be 
easily moved in the spring. 

Grouse Creek. 

The Waverly mine, having had a good season's water, was enabled to declare a dividend 
of 65.50 per share. This is an increase of 50 cents per share over any previous year. 

Canadian Creek. 
The Slocan Cariboo Mining and Development Co. is at the present time endeavouring to 
reach the deep channel of Canadian creek by means of a shaft, which at the present time has 
been sunk to a depth of 50 feet. 

China Creek. 
Mr. B. A. Laselle has continued work on this property, with practically the same result 
as reported last year. 

Nugget Gulch. 
This property, also owned by Mr. B. A. Laselle, and on which a new hydraulic plant was 
installed last year, commenced operations in the early spring ; about -400 feet in length of the 
channel was uncovered, the result of which I have been unable to determine. 

Antler Creek. 

Thomas writes me as follows concerning the Russian Creek Mining Co. : — - 
" The Russian Creek Mining Company has little to say, otherwise than to report that 
during the past season all the work done was in the line of development. The ditch com- 
menced last season has been completed, a distance of over 3,000 feet having been constructed 
during the summer. A pipe-line has been purchased and is now on the way to the mine, and 
we expect to have the mine equipped and ready for piping by the opening of the coming 
season." 

Cunningham Creek. 

On the Bear hydraulic claim, on Cunningham creek, my expectations have not been 
realized, as the large dam, built by this company for storing water for the season's work, burst 
in the early part of the summer, and the company was compelled to shut dow)i ; but I am 
pleased to say the damage done by the bursting of the dam has been repaired and the claim is 
now in readiness for next season's work. 

Office Statistics — Cariboo District, 1907. 

Free miners' certificates issued, companv 1- 

ii n I! individual 355 

Records and transfers of placer mining claims 2i 

Leaves of absence 26 

\Vater records issued 26 

Placer mining leases issued 25 

ii ii cancelled 6 



8 Ed. 7 Cariboo District. L 41 



Revenue Receipts. 

Free miners' certificates § 2,642 00 

Mining receipts, general 25,089 95 

Leaves of absence 70 00 

Land sales 46,331 46 

Land revenue 666 00 

Revenue tax 2,907 00 

Real property tax 3,385 82 

Personal propertv tax 2,521 44 

Wild land tax . . 970 94 

Income tax 417 64 

Licences, spirits 2,087 50 

h trade 610 00 

J. P. Court fines 335 00 

Miscellaneous ... , 84 81 

Total $88,119 50 



QUESNEL MIXING DIVISION.* 
Report by W. Stephenson, Mining Recorder. 

I beg to submit my annual report upon the condition of mining, together with an estimate 
of the production of gold made during the year 1907, in the Quesnel Mining Division. 

It will be observed that there has been this year but little improvement over the preceding 
year. 

The actual mining work done was very limited, the principal reason for which was that 
the great amount of construction work carried on in this section during the greater part of 
the mining season, and the unusually high wages paid for all kinds of labour on these works, 
absorbed numbers of men that would otherwise have been engaged in actual mining. The 
smaller hydraulic mines were, for the same reason, short handed, and had to pay unusually 
high wages, which limited their operations. 

The supplv of water for hydraulic and other surface mining operations was fairly good 
this past season, but this advantage was more than offset by the scarcity of labour for mining 
operations. As there are, at present, no drift or lode mines being operated in this Division, 
work for the season is practically closed in November, except in a very favourable winter a 
few persons may continue to work on the bars in the rivers exposed at the low stage of the 
waters in winter. 

There has been very little prospecting done this past year, and there are, consequently, no 
new developments to report. 

Despite the fact that the production of gold in the division for the past two seasons has 
been unsatisfactory, it. is felt that this is attributable to temporary conditions and that the 
Division will again retrieve its reputation as a placer mining district. 



*The southern boundary of the Quesnel Mining Division was slightly changed by Order in Council, 
which took effect on June 1st, 1906. 

The changed boundary line now runs from a point on the height of land between the Horsefly river on 
north and Bridge and 111-Mile creeks on south, to a crossing of the Cariboo Main Trunk road at the 144- 
Mile House ; thence along the north side of the 8an Jose river and Williams lake to a crossing of the Fraser 
river half way between Buckskin and Meldrum creeks. The remainder of the boundaries of the Division 
are unchanged. This change places the 15U-Mile House in Quesnel Mining Division and this point has now 
been made the location of the office of the Mining Recorder for the Division. 



L 42 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



In the Horsefly section no mining has been done for the past two seasons ; some prospect- 
ting was done this past season on the upper Horsefly, with results that give hope that work- 
able claims will yet be found in that section. 

Quartz mining has received very little attention during the past two years — only assess- 
ment work having been done and a few new locations recorded. 

Xote by Provincial Mineralogist. — The most important mining property in the 
Quesnel Mining Division has, for many years, been the Consolidated Cariboo Hydraulic Mining 
Company's property at Bullion, on the south fork of the Quesnel river. This property was 
taken over in 1906 by the Guggenheim Exploration Company, of New York, as was noted in 
last year's report. This company started in, after a careful examination of the property, to 
bring in a large additional quantity of water from Spanish lake. The estimated cost of this 
additional water system was over $500,000, of which amount over 8200,000 was spent in 1906. 
The work was actively renewed in the spring of 1907 and carried on until July, when all work 
was suspended and since then the property has been idle. The new company has since 
announced its intention of abandoning the enterprise completely. 

The cause of this stoppage of work is not definitely known, but is reported to have 
been, at least partially, that the then approaching financial panic in the East, which subse- 
quently involved the New York Company, necessitated a curtailment of outlay of capital. 



8 Ed. 7 Cassiar District. L 43 



CASSIAR DISTRICT. 



ATLIN MINING DIVISION. 



RAINY HOLLOW CAMP. 

Notes by the Provincial Mineralogist. 

Rainy Hollow is the name locally given to the basin surrounding the headwaters of the 
Klehini river, a tributary of the Chilkat river, which it enters from the west. The Chilkat 
river and the Klehini river both have their sources in the territory formerly comprising the 
Chilkat Mining Division of British Columbia, but which is now included in the Atlin Mining 
Division, of which it forms the western part. Both these rivers, about midway in their 
course, pass out of British Columbia into Alaskan territory. 

Between Bennett lake in British Columbia, on the line of the White Pass Railway, and 
the Chilkat river, there is a range of high mountains, which it is impracticable to cross, even 
with a pack-train, so that the only way to reach the Rainy Hollow camp is through Alaskan 
territory. The route usually taken to the camp is from Skagway, Alaska, by a small gasoline 
launch which runs daily, to Haines Mission, an important U. S. military post ; thence by 
waggon road a distance of a couple of miles across the peninsula to Chilkat inlet, into which 
the Chilkat river flows. Here Indians and canoes can be obtained and the Chilkat river 
followed up to the Indian village of Klukwan, at the junction of the Klehini. 

The IT. S. Government has already surveyed a line for a waggon road from Haines to 
Klukwan along the eastern side of the Chilkat, and it is expected that this road will be built 
within the next two years. The distance from Haines to Klukwan is about 20 miles, and at 
present the only method of travel, or for the transportation of supplies, is by canoe. 

From Klukwan the Klehini river is followed up to Porcupine City, a distance of 18 miles 
by a waggon road built by the U. S. Government along the southern bank. Porcupine City 
formerly suppported a couple of hotels and as many stores, but in 1906 the only occupants of 
the townsite were the employees of a company engaged in placer mining on Porcupine creek, 
for whose accommodation the company maintained a store, but the hotels have disappeared. 

From Porcupine the waggon road follows up the river bed for some four or five miles, 
being only available, in summer, during low water, crossing over to the northern bank, con- 
necting there with a crude waggon road, formerly built b}' R.N.W.M. Police, which is followed 
for a further distance of two miles to old Pleasant Camp, on the Alaska-British Columbia 
boundary line, and at one time occupied by the Mounted Police. 

The Province of British Columbia is entered at Pleasant Camp, from which point to 
Rainy Hollow the Provincial Government was last fall engaged in building a trail, or sleigh 
l'oad, which was, however, not cut through in 1906, so the old trail had to be followed. This 
follows up the north bank of the Klehini for some three miles to Dalton's cache. The cache 
is about 500 feet higher elevation than Porcupine City and is about 1,000 feet above sea level. 

From the cache the trail turns north, away. from the river, rising, by a series of zig-zags, 
in two miles an additional height of 1,000 feet to the level of the plateau, which slopes slightly 
to the north and is devoid of trees or vegetation. The trail follows across this plateau for 



L 44 Report of the Minister of- Mines. 1908 



some six miles, when it gradually descends into Rainy Hollow. The plateau is said to be very 
dangerous to cross in autumn, owing to the prevalence of dense fogs, which arise without 
warning, and in winter on account of blinding snow-storms. 

To avoid this portion of the trail with its incidental and unnecessary climb — impracticable 
for even a sleigh-road — the Provincial Government has chosen a line for the new trail following 
the river valley, and running through wooded country most of the way, which will afford 
shelter at all seasons, and it also has the advantage of being some two or three miles shorter. 

Although there are waggon roads and trails there are no horses to be obtained ; the 
Indians track the canoes with the necessary baggage and supplies up the Klehini to within 
three miles of Pleasant Camp, but do not carry passengers up stream, so the whole distance 
has to be walked over very rough roads. After leaving the canoe, the baggage and supplies 
have to be packed on one's back in and out of the Hollow. 

The time taken by the writer in teaching Rainy Hollow from Skagway was as follows : — 
1 day, Skagway to Haines ; 
1 day, Haines to Klukwan ; 
1 day, Klukwan to Porcupine ; 
1 day, Porcupine to Pleasant Camp ; 
1 day, Pleasant Camp to Rainy Hollow. 

The possibility of improved transportation facilities by the rivers is very slight, as they 
are only navigable for canoes, while the swift current and the ever-shifting character of the 
river-bed render any permanent improvement of the channel impracticable. Should sufficient 
ore be found to justify it, there are no serious engineering difficulties in the way of building 
a railway from Haines to Rainy Hollow, while Haines offers first class terminal facilities and 
a good harbour. 

The Provincial Mineralogist, in the fall of 1900, made an examination of, and a report 
on the mineral claims of Rainy Hollow, which is included in the Report of that year. 
Since that time little real development work has been done; some prospecting has taken place 
and many of the claims then in existence, having lapsed, have been re-staked under other 
names and ownership. Some new ground has been located, but, as the old posts have 
disappeared, it was found to be impracticable to determine how much of ground examined 
was of recent discovery. 

Prospectors take their supplies to the camp in early spring, over the ice on dog-sledges 
and toboggans, a proceeding so expensive and arduous that it is not to be wondered at that 
little or no serious development has been attempted in the district. 

The Wonderful and Senora mineral claims, owned by Richard 
Wonderful and Kennedy and J. W. Burnham, were located prior to 1900 and are situated 
Sonora. on the right bank of Wilson creek, which flows from the east into the 

Klehini river at Rainy Hollow. The claims are situated on what is locally 
known as the Custer lead, a contact of one of the three or more large parallel dykes which cut 
across the country to the south, and along the course of which most of the known mineralisa- 
tion occurs. The rocks forming the contact are limestone and schist, cut by a dark, fine- 
grained dyke rock, having a north and south (mag.) strike. The contact is traceable for a long 
distance, being marked by a prominent iron cap. 

The first cropping visited on the Wonderful showed much iron oxide and dark red gar- 
nets along a lime contact, but no mineral of value was visible. No work had been done at 
this spot, the cropping merely indicating the extension of lower workings. A second iron-cap, 
some 20 feet away, showed a certain amount of copper pyrites throughout the mass, but was 



Ed. 7 



Cassiar District. 




L 46 Report of the Minister of- Mines. 190S 

also undeveloped. Farther down, on the same contact, a tunnel had been run in for 1-10 feet, 
which showed a considerable though somewhat irregular deposit of pyrrhotite carrying copper 
and a small percentage of zinc blende. A sample of the pyrrhotite taken for assay gave : 
Copper, 2.6 % ; silver, 2.2 oz. to ton, and a trace of gold. 

The Sonora is an extension of the Wonderful and on the same contact, nearer Wilson 
creek. On this claim a tunnel has been driven in for 30 feet and a number of open surface 
cuts made, with practically the same results. 

The Victoria mineral claim, formerly known as the Jarvis claim, is 
Victoria. owned by J. W. Burnham. A pit about six feet deep has been sunk in a 

white crystalline limestone near the contact of a dyke. The sides of the 
pit show the lime-stone to be cut by a number of small stringers of mineral — galena, copper 
pyrites and zinc blende. Some 200 feet distant from this first pit and around a small knoll 
an old open cut has been recently cleared out. This cut is about 15 feet long by from 3 to 
5 feet deep, and the sides show stringers of mineral somewhat similar to the first pit. 

Some 30 feet from the first open cut is a second one, also 15 feet long by 5 feet deep, in 
which is exposed a seam from 2 to 4 inches wide, of mixed sulphides — galena, zinc blende and 
copper pyrites, which appear to have been deposited as replacements of the limestone. 

A sample of the ore taken from the face of the two open cuts gave, upon assay : Lead, 
31.5 % ; copper, 2.3 % ; silver, 8.8 oz. to ton, and a trace of gold. 

The Maid of Erin mineral claim, owned b}' J. W. Burnham and 
Maid of Erin. Richard Kennedy, is situated on the west slope of Mineral mountain, some 
700 feet above the valley of Klehini river, and is, as near as could be 
determined, a re-staking of the same ground as was formerly occupied in 1900 by the 
Carmichael and Pretoria claims. A bed of limestone, lying nearly horizontal, outcrops along 
the face of a small hill, in contact with which is a highly silicious pink-coloured layer, lying 
conformably with the lime, and apparently an indurated sandstone. Along this outcrop the 
limestone appears to have been replaced, for a thickness of 3 to 16 inches, by copper sulphides, 
chiefly bornite. This outcrop has been exposed at intervals by stripping and open cuts over a 
distance of several hundred feet, but in no instance has a depth of more than 2 or 3 feet 
from the surface been attained. The ore exposed is of exceeding high grade as copper ore, 
and would be of value if reasonable transportation facilities were available, but, of course, 
cannot be extracted under the present conditions, which accounts, to a large extent, for the 
very slight amount of work done on the property. 

Two separate samples were taken of the ore exposed at different points, which gave, upon 
assay: Copper, 29.2 %; silver, 50.2 oz. to ton, with trace of gold, and copper, 37.9 %; 
silver, 60.8 oz. to the ton, with trace of gold. 

The Adams mineral claim, owned by M. J. O'Connor, is another 
Adams. property located on the contact known as the Custer lead, which contact 

has been exposed for some distance by surface stripping. The mineralisa- 
tion is chiefly pyrrhotite, with a small amount of galena and molybdenite. In an open cut on 
the hill top the mineralisation is some 4 feet wide. A sample of this exposure assayed 0.04 
oz. gold and 0.5 oz. silver to the ton. On the contact on the other side of the diorite dyke 
there is an outcrop of iron sulphides, with some galena and zinc blende. At the time no work 
had been done to determine the extent of this mineralisation, but a cross-cut had been started 
for the purpose and was within a few feet of the ledge visible in outcrop. This deposit was 
not sampled. 



S Ed. 7 Cassiar District. L 47 



The Storraway mineral claim, owned by M. J. O'Connor, is also on 
Storraway. Custer hill, along the line of what is known as the Hartford lead, which is 
indicated by iron croppings extending for miles to the northward. This is 
on ground formerly occupied in 1900 by the New York mineral claim, and is about a quarter 
of a mile from "Wilson creek. The first open cut showed a trap dyke carrying iron sulphides. 
A short distance to the south, in an open cut, is a pit some eight feet deep sunk prior to 1900, 
in which there is exposed a large body of pyrrhotite, shown to be at least four feet thick, and 
it is probably considerably greater. This exposed mineral was thoroughly sampled and assayed 
for copper, gold and silver, but did not show values of any importance. 

The Fairfield mineral claim, owned by Michael Cassin, is situated near 

Fairfield. the head of "Wilson creek, on the east side of Copper butte, and was 

formerly the Columbia mineral claim. Near a small lake there was an 

open cut 20 feet long, from which a tunnel has been driven in for some 10 feet on the contact of 

a mass of limestone with diorite. Along this contact there is a deposit of pyrrhotite, which 

was sampled and assayed, giving copper, 0.6 %, with traces of gold and silver. 

The Montana mineral claim, owned by W. S. Brown, is situated on 

Montana. the west side of Copper, or Limestone butte, as it is sometimes called. 

This was the only claim in the camp upon which men were found at 

work, and they were engaged in erecting a cabin, the timbers for which had to be hauled 

some three miles, and from a lower elevation, as the hills around Rainy Hollow are bare. 

The claim was surveyed in 1907 by E. S. Wilkinson, P. L. S. Some little stripping has 
been done for about 100 feet up the hillside, from which there had been extracted one or two 
tons of very nice copper ore — bornite. As far as could be determined from the rather erratic 
workings, the bornite occurred along the contacts of limestone with several quartz-porphyry 
dykes, occurring associated with garnets, etc. No defined vein or lead could be seen 5 
although there were various outcrops carrying ore, and it is probable some of them were 
slides from a main ledge in place. Preparations were being made to drive in a tunnel, 
cross-cutting the country, so that whatever ledges exist may be developed at some depth. The 
occurrence of mineral is very similar to that seen on the Maid of Erin mineral claim. 

A sample of the selected ore taken for assay gave: Copper, 26.5 % ; silver, 33.2 oz. to the 
ton, and a trace of gold. 

The Atlin mineral claim, owned by Richard Kennedy, is on a hill lying to the north of 
Copper or Limestone butte. A small tunnel had been started and run in about six feet on an 
outcropping of iron and copper sulphides with some zinc blende, but this ore body was cut off 
by a quartz-porphyry dyke and could not be traced further. The showing was unimportant. 

The Mocking Bird mineral claim, owned by Mike Cassin and Jos. Chisholm, is on the 
Hartford lead, and is an extension of the Storraicay or New York claim, and also shows a 
deposit of pyrrhotite of the same character as found on that claim. 

The Horrible mineral claim, owned by Mike Cassin, is situated on the 

Horrible. steep east face of Mineral mountain. A very narrow tunnel had been 

driven in for about 20 feet through a hard, white, silicious rock, classed 
upon microscopic examination as an altered porphyrite. The face of the tunnel was in what 
was apparently a gray, silicious lime, very hard, showing small specks of iron pyrites. Some 
100 yards to the north of the tunnel, along the face of the precipice, an open cut had been 
run into the hill for 10 feet, in which was exposed a number of small patches of iron pyrites 
which gave, upon assay: Copper, 0.86%; silver, 0.8 oz. to the ton, with trace of gold. A 
few patches of copper pyrites were also visible, and, although the quantity of mineral was 



L 4S Report of the Minister of Mixes. 1908 



very small, gave unexpectedly high assay values as compared with other exposures in the 
vicinity, as a picked sample of the mineral assayed: Copper, 15 % ; silver, S.Q oz., and gold 
1.04 oz. to the ton. 

The Nova Scotia mineral claim, owned by David Fraser, is located below the Horrible, on 
Jarvis creek. A tunnel had been driven in some 20 feet, showing bands containing iron 
sulphides, which upon assay, however, showed no values. 



ATLIN MINING DIVISION. 
Report of J. A. Fraser, Gold Commissioner. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my report on mining operations in the Atlin Mining 
Division of Cassiar District for the year ending December 31st, 1907. 

Notwithstanding the fact that the number of men engaged in mining during last season 
was less, by about 100, than in any previous year, the output reported and revenue therefrom 
was considerably in excess of that of 1906 and compares very favourably with that of the 
vear 1905; in fact, except in the matter of lease rentals, in which there was a large 
decrease as compared with last year, there was a general increase in revenue from mining 
sources, which, coupled with the general satisfaction expressed by the operators, might be 
deemed sufficient justification for regarding the year's operations as quite satisfactory. The 
keen disappointment experienced from the scarcity of water, the scarcity of labour, and the 
failure of certain promotors and bondees to carry out contemplated development and instal- 
lation work, tended to mar the general satisfaction that otherwise obtained throughout the 
camp. 

The drifting operations of last winter were, as usual, satisfactory, the only regret being 
that so few were thus employed. Drifting operations are being carried on this winter also, 
and the reported success of the operators is better than in any previous winter, but again I 
must note decreased numbers, there being only 75 to 80 men so employed this winter, as 
compared with 100 last winter, 190 the winter before, and so on. 

Drifting operations are being carried on this winter on Spruce, Pine, Gold Run, Boulder 
and Ruby creeks, and possibly on Wilson creek. 

McKee Creek. 

Only four individual operators were engaged on this creek this last season, and they for 
but a comparatively short time. Their ground being pretty well worked out and water being 
scarce, the results were not as satisfactory as in former seasons. The whole creek being 
practically under one management, although held by two companies, the McKee Consolidated 
Hydraulic, Limited, owning the leases on the upper portion of the creek, was granted 
exemption from the operating conditions of said leases on account of the scarcity of water, 
and so as not to embarrass the operations of the Amalgamated McKee Creek Mining Company, 
Limited, on the lower portion of the creek. This company, under the superintendence of 
Mr. S. H. Plumbe, with Mr. Geo. Adams as foreman, and latterly under the direct supervision 
of Mr. Fletcher T. Hamshaw, president and general manager, commenced operations about the 
middle of May and continued as water would permit until October 8th. About midsummer 
the company was compelled by the scarcity of water to reduce the width of the sluices to make 
the available quantity more effective. Notwithstanding these and other difficulties, this com- 
pany, according to the president's report, moved about 500,000cubic yards of overburden, washed 



8 Ed. 7 Cassiar District. L 49 



nearly 60,000 cubic yards of pay gravel, thereby uncovering nearly 7,000 square yards of bed- 
rock and recovering therefrom nearly $24,000. The last pit worked was the best, and 
according to said report averaged $8.45 per square yard of bedrock. It also removed a 
great quantity of overburden (nearly 400,000 cubic yards), which leaves a large amount of 
pay gravel exposed for next season's operation. About $8,000 was expended on new plant, 
pipe-lines, etc., which, with the amount of dead-work already done, leads to the expectation of a 
good start and excellent results for next season. A force of about 20 men was employed 
during the season. 

Pine Creek. 

Not more than 12 individual miners operated on Pine and Gold creeks this season, but 
those who did were very well rewarded for their labour. 

On the upper portion of " Gold Run " Mr. L. B. Harris, with two assistants and a steam 
(Keystone) drill, spent the entire open season prospecting for the pay-streak which is confidently 
believed to exist there, as well as farther down stream. The valley being wide and the area 
large, he did not succeed in satisfactorily locating it, but he intends continuing next season 
and either locating it or demonstrating to his own satisfaction its non-existence. 

Of the companies operating on Pine creek, from the standpoint of number of men employed 
and output, the Atlin Consolidated Mining Company, Limited, under the superintendence of Mr. 
Thos. D. Harris, led the van this year. This company, locally known as the " Guggenheims," 
commenced operating with the steam shovel on June 8th and closed down on October 18th. 
The operating plant consists of one 70-ton traction steam shovel, three 5-ton electric locomotives 
and about 40 dump cars, an elevated screening and washing plant, with under current and 
tailing sluices, one 75 h.p. motor-generator, transformer, station, etc., driven partly by steam 
and partly by electric power. During that time they employed from 45 to 55 men (average 
of about 50) and moved an immense quantity of gravel, with, I believe, very satisfactory 
results. This company found it expedient and economical to run in '"'powder drifts " ahead 
of the shovel and shake up the gravel with dynamite. The superintendent, Mr. Harris, 
also introduced a new feature in methods of operation here by installing a 10-inch rotary 
pump driven by a 50 h. p. electric motor, by which water was taken from Pine creek, just 
adjacent, practically on the level, and was supplied with such force and volume as to provide 
a stream with which quite an area of bedrock was successfully worked (sluiced) hydraulically. 
But for the lack of certain necessary portions of the plant, which were delayed in transporta- 
tion, the shovel might have commenced operating a month earlier. 

The Pine Creek Power Company, Limited, and North Columbia Gold Mining Company, 
under the superintendence of Mr. J. M. Ruffner, president and general manager of both com- 
panies, with a force of from 30 to 50 men, operated their hydraulic properties both above and 
below Discovery and had a very successful season. They commenced operations early in May 
and continued until about the 12th of November, thus putting in just about six months actual 
hydraulic work, and working up to the last quite as effectively as in mid-summer ; in fact, the 
best returns secured were during the last month of operation. These companies installed a 
small steam shovel on a scow (which floats in the ditch) and commenced the enlargement of 
their main ditch early in the season, but only completed about two miles of it, and it will take 
them the greater part of next season to complete the work. The ditch thus far constructed is 
about 25 feet wide on top and 5 feet deep, and is calculated to carry 15,000 miner's inches of 
water, and when completed will certainly place these companies in an excellent and very 
enviable position for carrying on their hydralic operations and washing out the famous 
" yellow gravel " which is so uniformly auriferous and of which their properties appear to cover 
a very large quantity. 



L 50 Eeport of the Minister of. Mixes. 1908 



The British- American Dredging Company, Limited, whose name has been changed to the 
British Columbia Electric Mining Company, Limited, has done nothing this year except that 
its power plant at Pine Creek falls has supplied the A. C. M. Co.'s steam shovel with the 
electrical power used. 

From 90 to 115 men were employed on Pine creek and Gold Run during the summer. 

Spruce Creek. 

Only from 100 to 120 men were employed on this creek during the summer, but the 
results of individual operation were as remunerative as in any previous year, and some of the 
best results were obtained from re-sluicing "tailings'" that had been washed once or twice 
already. The reduced numbers operating on the creek left the diminished water supply more 
generally available, and there was consequently less wrangling than in former years, although 
troubles of that nature have not entirely disappeared. The drifting operations of last winter 
were generally very satisfactory, and reports from there this winter are more than satisfactory. 
About 45 men are drifting there, and there are about 65 people of all classes on the creek. 

The Spruce Creek Power Company, Limited, under the management of Mr. W. C. Hall, 
with a force of 12 men, spent the early part of the season hydraulicing in the same place as in 
former seasons, but with what result I cannot say, as I was not favoured with a report by the 
manager. During the latter part of the season the force was engaged opening up and 
installing a plant at Spruce creek falls, some distance down stream, where I understand things 
are in shape for a good start next spring. 

The Northern Mines, Limited, allowed its steam shovel to remain unused during this 
season, but its ground was being worked by a crew of about 16 men, on a "lay," who had 
returned to the original pick and shovel methods and, I believe, realised good returns. 

Considerable desultory work of a prospecting nature was carried on at various points 
along the creek, but none worthy of special mention. Practically no fresh ground has been 
broken, such work as has been done being confined to the portions that have been under 
development for several seasons. 

Birch Creek. 

About a dozen men operated on this creek with better than usual results, the scarcity of 
water being the only drawback. A small crew of individual miners did very well on the 
upper portions. 

Messrs. Pearse & Co., operating the ground and plant of the Dominion Trust Co., com- 
menced piping on May 4th and continued until November 1st, but were limited to about two 
hours a day use of the monitor, the water supply not affording any more. 

Boulder Creek. 

Between 45 and 50 men operated on this creek during the season, including the French 
Company's employees. The results were, as usual, good in general and very good in some 
cases. Those who drifted on the creek last winter realized splendid results. About 15 people 
are employed drifting there this winter. 

The Societe Miniere de la Colombie Britannique, under the management of Mons. Tade 
Obalski, M.E., employed about 13 men during the summer, and realized the best returns, with 
least cost, of any season since it has undertaken to operate on the creek, cleaning up nearly 
840,000. Even with these satisfactory results, some ground was worked over that had been 
" drifted ;: during the winter, demonstrating that the " pay " on this creek is more generally 
distributed throughout the gravel and is not all found within the range of drifting 
operations. 



8 Ed. 7 Cassiar District. L 51 



Ruby Creek. 

The Ruby Creek Syndicate, under the foremanship of Mr. Rob't. Mackay, opened up its 

property and, with a small force, continued prospecting underground from the middle of May 

until September 20th. The average value of the gravel handled was satisfactory. The owners, 

unfortunately, have not yet secured the necessary capital to properly equip the property with 

a suitable plant. 

Wright Creek. 

About 11 miners operated on this creek throughout the summer season, and, I believe, 
with perhaps one exception, were well satisfied with results. Messrs. Gierke & Co., in 
particular, did very well and are being repaid for their several seasons of un remunerative 
labour on the creek. 

Otter Creek. 

On this creek Messrs. Carmichael, Moran ifc Co. (the Otter Creek Development Company), 
who own the Otter Creek Consolidated group of hydraulic leases, situated on upper Otter 
creek, worked with a force of five men throughout the season, and were again rewarded by 
very fair returns. They commenced operations on April 25th and continued until October 
21st, while active piping was carried on from May 25th to October 15th. During this period 
the}' moved about 20,000 cubic yards of gravel, uncovering over 2,000 square yards of bedrock? 
from which they recovered gold averaging upwards of 82.50 per square yard of bedrock. 
They also constructed dams for the conservation of water and performed other dead-work 
which is calculated to enable them to make a much improved showing next season. 

On lower Otter creek the Otter Creek Hydraulic Cold Mining Company, which controls 
a group of 11 leases, under the superintendence of Mr. M. R. Jamieson, had a crew of from 
four to eight men employed from June 1st to October 15th, preparing for the installation of 
hydraulic plant, in the course of which was constructed about 2,100 feet of ditch and flume 
4' x 3|', with necessary head-dams, etc., and a larger dam on the "divide" between Otter and 
Spruce creeks, thus establishing a reservoir capable of conserving a large quantity of water- 
Everything is in readiness for the installation next spring of a hydraulic plant, with 
which to at once commence operations and be able to make a fair showing before the end of 

the season, 

Wilson Creek. 

Although a large number of claims were located on this creek last year, no work worth 
mentioning was done on any but Discovery claim. On this claim the discoverer, Mr. Andrew 
Grier, and his partner, Mr. May, did very well indeed. This year Mr. Grier, who acquired 
sole ownership, operated throughout the summer with a crew of about seven men, commencing 
to sluice on June 24th and ceasing on October 15th. Although they, at times, got off the 
"pay-streak," at no time did they average less than wages and, I believe, they averaged 
upwards of $10 a day to the man for the whole season. 

At intervals, during the past season, some fresh report from the creek would cause a 
stampede, with the result that from seven to eight miles of the creek has been located in 
individual claims, but with two or three exceptions no continued or systematic prospecting has 
been done, except on Disco very claim, as above mentioned. About li miles below Discovery 
one man made upwards of 820 a day "panning" for a short time, but that was not 
continuous. There are four men on the creek this winter. 

O'Donxel River. 

On this river several leases have been located, but, with the exception of Mr. Rob't. 
McKee's operations, no work whatever has been done by any of the locators. Mr. McKee 
brought in supplies last winter and commenced operations last spring with three men, but 



L 52 Keport of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



ceased early in the season at the instance of a party to whom he had bonded his property and 
who was preparing to institute extensive development operations when the financial stringency 
overtook him and upset his calculations for the time being. 

On Graham, Consolation and Lincoln creeks some prospecting was being done, but 
without definite results. 

On Gold Bottom creek an American company acquired bonds on a group of leases thereon 
located and, in the fall of 1906, built cabins, etc., and commenced prospecting by sinking a 
shaft, which, however, encountered water at the usual depth in this district, viz., somewhere 
between 20 and 30 feet, and work was suspended until they could procure suitable pumping 
apparatus. 

Mineral Claims. 

The impetus given to prospecting for mineral claims in 1906, by the active development 
undertaken by Col. Conrad and his associates around Windy Arm, was not sustained in 1907, 
the enthusiasm subsiding in sympathy with the restricted development maintained by those 
same parties, and a glance at the statement of locations and certificates of work recorded 
conveys the impression that not many new properties have been located and that a number 
previously located had been abandoned. It is encouraging, however, to note that all the 
principal properties are being protected, if nothing more, and that the assessment work, where 
properly done, in most cases reveals increasing values, as the properties are opened uj>. I am 
pleased to be able to state that the Beavis mine, situated about three-quarters of a mile north 
of Atlin, under the management of Mr. C. E Wynn-Johnson, and the Table Mountain 
property, situated on Taku Arm and about 12 miles from Atlin, under the superintendence of 
Mr. J. A. Oliver, are being systematically developed this winter. 

Rainy Hollow. 

The anticipated development of the properties in this district, unfortunately, was not 
vigorously entered upon this year by the bondees, so that they are practically no further ahead 
than they were a year ago, except in one case, where the representative of American capital 
is building cabins, etc., preparatory to active development. The recent visit of the Provincial 
Mineralogist to that district will have provided you with fuller and more reliable information 
with reference to the district than anything that I can offer, so that I will conclude by stating 
that trails have already been built along the Ivlehini river and across the divide from Pleasant 
Camp to the head of Boulder creek, which will materially assist the prospectors and pave the 
way for the waggon road that will probably follow. 

I may say that the falling off in the amount of revenue collected, as compared with 1906, 
is represented almost entirely by the great discrepancy in the amount collected from lease 
rentals, as already noted, which alone amounts to more than the difference, the amount 
collected for free miner's certificates (more than usual of which were taken out elsewhere) and 
the lesser amount collected (and collectible) for taxes, both real and personal. There was a 
considerable advance in the amount collected under most of the other heads representing 
sources of revenue. 

Office Statistics — Atlin Mining Division. 

No. of free miners' certificates issued (individual) 607 

" " n n ii (individual special) 5 

ii 'I m ii it (companies) 9 

H placer records issued . 124 

ii ii re-records issued, 420, representing claims 415 

ii leaves of absence, issued, 137, representing claims 360 

n grouping permits issued 21 



8 Ed. 7 



( assiar District. 



L 53 



Office Statistics — Atlin Mining Division. — Concluded. 

No. of abandonments (placer) 8 

ii permits to move stakes, etc < s 

n bills of sale (placer) 170 

ii it ii (hydraulic) 27 

ii ii ii (mineral) 45 

ii mineral records issued 177 

ii certificates of work issued 266 

ii filings (mineral) 33 

H abandonments (mineral) 3 

Gold reported 8 339,989 62 

Royalty paid 5, 1 92 90 

Revenue Collected, 1907. 

Free miners' certificates (individual) % 2,924 75 

ii ii ii (companies) 700 00 

Mining receipts, lease rentals 8,420 00 

n H lease deposits 5-40 00 

.1 n water records and rentals 1,447 50 

bedrock flumes 200 00 

ii ii other sources 8,433 70 

Leaves of absence . . 900 00 

Land sales, 8280.00, leave of absence 82.00 282 00 

Timber royalty 1,025 77 

Hand loggers' licences 20 00 

Licences, trade . 1 55 00 

ii liquor 1,637 50 

ii deposits on account of expenses advertising 149 00 

H marriage 30 00 

Real property tax 2,303 GO 

Personal property tax 222 65 

Wild land tax 12 65 

Income tax 55 00 

Mineral tax 5,192 99 

Revenue tax 867 00 

Tax on Crown-granted mineral claims 361 25 

Small Debts and Magistrate's Courts 189 10 

Miscellaneous , 108 50 



836,177 96 



Gold Recovered — Atlin District, 1907 





Individual Miners. 


Companies. 


Name of Creek. 


Ounces. 


Value. 


Royalty. 


Ounces. 


Value. 


Royalty. 


Birch . . . 








378 

2,490 
1,458 

345 
9,041 


$ 5,670 00 

38,600 00 

23.329 00 

5,347 50 

140,134 53 




Boulder , 


1,058 


§ 16,393 50 


$ 118 95 


i 732 00 
426 60 


Otter 








66 95 




829 

103 

3,248 

4i 15 
543 


12,847 59 
1.596 55 

51.969 00 
6,481 50 
8,509 25 

$97,797 39 


114 10 


2,602 69 


Ruby 






467 25 

82 70 
79 35 


1,820 


29,111 20 


502 40 


Wright . . 














Total 


6,1S6 


$862 35 


15,532 


$242,192 23 


$4,330 64 







L 54 



Report of the Minister of .Mines. 



1908 



Summary. 



Individual miners 
Companies 



Ounces. 



6,186 
15,532 



21,718 



Value. 



$ 97,797 39 
242,192 23 



8339,989 62 



Royalty, 



$ 862 35 
4,330 64 

$5,192 99 



STIKINE AND LIARD MINING DIVISIONS. 
Report of James Porter, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit my seventeenth annual report on mining operations in the 
Stikine and Liard Mining Divisions of Cassiar District for the year ending 31st December, 
1907. 

The year has an exceptionally light record in mining from the point of view of the actual 
output of gold, and this fact is in most part attributable to the unsuccessful operations of the 
Berrv Creek Mining Company, Ltd. It is deplorable that this energetic and deserving company 
has not met with better success, for its own welfare and for the advancement of prosperity in 
the district generally. I think it is safe to say that the successful operations of the company 
would mean a great deal for the place, as, no doubt, it is being closely watched by " people on 
the outside " who are ready and willing to advance capital towards opening and working 
hydraulic diggings here if they had the assurance of one fruitful venture. 

Very little attention has been paid during the year to outside prospecting, and apart from 
the recording of quite a number of quartz locations and several hydraulic leases, I have 
nothing to report in the way of new finds other than what will appear later in this report. 



STIKINE MINING DIVISION. 
Iskut River. 

This stream is probably the largest tributary of the Stikine river; it flows from the north- 
east and joins the main river a few miles above the crossing of the International boundary. 
Some attention was paid to prospecting for quartz on the lower part of this river during 1906, 
the operations being taken up again this season, and in October nine locations were recorded 
in my office by the party residing in Wrangel, Alaska. It is said that rock taken from some 
of the claims gives very encouraging assays. The place is easy of access, and it would not 
require very high grade ore to make it pay for handling. 

First North Fork of Clearwater River. 

There have been no new developments on this creek, and the facts regarding it remain 
the same as reported last season. The one company operating there has not done well, on 
account of a late freshet that washed out its ditch-head and otherwise prevented the carrying 
on of successful mining, as the water remained high for considerable length of time. Nothing 
more than assessment work has been done on the three mineral claims which are owned by 
Mr. Lewis Kirk on the opposite side of the Stikine river from Clearwater river. 



8 Ed. 7 Cassiar District. 



LIARD MINING DIVISION. 

Dease Creek. 

On this creek there are five hydraulic and one creek lease. Four of the hydraulic leases 
were re-staked and recorded during the year. Not any of the claims on the creek have been 
fitted with machinery, and the only work in progress there during the season was in the 
hands of four white miners and as many Chinese, who have small holdings on the creek. 

Thibert Creek. 

This stream is so well known that it would be a waste of time for me to attempt to give 
a description of it here. Suffice it to say that it is on this creek that the Berry Creek Mining 
Company, Limited, has ten hydraulic leases, of approximately 80 acres each, which lie on the 
right or south side of the stream. Seven of these claims adjoin, with a frontage each of 1,500 
feet on Thibert creek. The other three are above the mouth of Berry creek. Although this 
company was in thorough shape to operate on a large scale, it is regrettable to say that the 
season ended most discouragingly, owing to several caves or land-slides from the hills over- 
hanging the workings completely filling the diggings and doing much damage to the pipe-lines 
and machinery generally about the works. The most destructive cave of all occurred late in 
August or early in September, burying the works and causing the manager to send the greater 
part of the men employed out of the District, as they could not be worked longer to any 
advantage. From all indications, the ground is quite rich enough to pay well if these mishaps 
could only be avoided, but the problem is how to prevent them. 

Any other mining on the creek has been of a desultory nature and of little account. 

Little Deloire Creek. 

This stream is a tributary of Thibert creek. It rises in the height of land lying between 
Dease and Thibert creeks and flows with a gradual trend towards the north, joining Thibert 
creek at a point about three miles above the junction of that stream with the Dease river. 
The creek is small and does not exceed seven or eight miles in length. During the early davs 
considerable placer gold was taken from it where the ground was found shallow, and some of 
the high bars and points paid very well. One or two unsuccessful attempts were made to 
bottom the deep ground. After that the creek was abandoned for several years, until 
prospecting was again resumed by the Mitchell brothers a few years ago. This season found 
these not-to-be-discouraged men again in the field, fully equipped and prepared to bottom the 
creek if possible, as they had brought with them a steam pumping outfit and a party of eight 
men. They put a shaft down to bedrock, which was reached in 25 feet, and I am pleased to 
report that they were rewarded by finding coarse gold in paying quantities. The shaft in 
question was sunk close to the present channel, and after reaching bottom a tunnel was run 
to cross-cut the channel. This was continued for 40 feet on good pay, without a raise in the 
rock, when, unfortunately, the shaft collapsed and allowed the diggings to fill with water. It 
was extremely lucky, however, that there was no one in the mine at the time. On account of 
this mishap, further operations for the season were abandoned and everything is being put in 
readiness for a start next spring. These people have secured three creek leases of half a mile 
each. 

McDame Creek and Tributaries. 

This creek is also well known, so I shall not on this occasion enter into any unnecessary 
detail regarding it. Several creek and hydraulic leases have been recorded on the main creek 
and one of its tributaries, but so far nothing more than development work has been done on 



L 56 Report of the Minister of. Mines. 1908 



any of these holdings. Some are now in bad standing, from delinquency in rentals and 
development work. Some individual mining is carried on, both along the main stream and 
some of its tributaries, with no marked success. There is good reason to suppose that when 
this once famous old creek is properly taken hold of and rightly handled by strong hydraulic 
companies it will prove itself to be worthy of more attention than what it is receiving at 
present. 

It is encouraging to note that several new quartz locations have been recorded during the 
year in the McDaine creek country, and assessment work has been recorded on a great many of 
the claims previously located and recorded. Seventeen mineral claims have been turned over to 
Messrs. James Rosenthal and Adolph Kurz, of Chicago, Illinois, who had a Provincial Land 
Surveyor in the district during the summer surveying their holdings, in view of Crown-granting 
them. These claims are mostly situated on the first south fork of McDame creek and Haskins 
mountain. In the summer of 1906 an expert, on behalf of the Chicago gentlemen mentioned, 
visited McDarne creek for the purpose of examining the different ledges covered by their 
present holdings, and his report was so favourable that a deal was made and the claims in 
question acquired. It is said that some of the claims are rich in gold, silver, copper, zinc and 
other values. I shall hope to be in a position when I make my next annual report to insert 
reliable facts and figures relating to the values of these properties. 

Rosella Creek. 

The Rosella Hydraulic Mining and Development Company, Ltd., of Victoria, B. C, has 
not made any marked headway this season with the work in hand on the hydraulic and creek 
holdings of the company on this creek. This may, in a measure, be owing to the regrettable 
and sudden death of the company's manager, the late Mr. John W. Haskins. 

The mineral locations made last season some distance to the south-east of McDame creek 
have been kept in good standing, and I understand that ore taken from them runs high in 
copper and other values. Two or three other claims were located there last spring. 

It must be understood that, under present conditions, the whole of this interior country 
will have to remain undeveloped, for the short seasons, high prices, slow and excessive trans- 
portation rates, all tend to retard its growth and to keep it in the background. Under more 
favourable conditions, however, I feel certain the country would soon show much activity, for 
there is little doubt about its richness from a mineral point of view. The advent of railroads 
into the country from the south will bring about great changes. 

Office Statistics — Stikine and Liaed Mining Divisions. 

Revenue collected from general mining receipts $3,176 40 

ii other sources 2,584 01 

Total revenue $5,760 41 




ROSE M C. EXPOSURE 



ETITE- IKEDA BAY, Q 




.CBuVtCLV • fc^*»'« 



HOUSE BOAT— IKEDA BAY MINES, Q. C. I. 



8 Ed. 7 Cassiar District. L 57 



SKEENA MINING DIVISION.* 



QUEEN CHARLOTTE ISLANDS. 

Report by Wm. Fleet Robertson, Provincial Mineralogist. 

The Queen Charlotte group of islands lies between the 52nd and 54-th degrees of north 
latitude and about 85 miles westward of the mainland, at the mouth of the Skeena river. The 
distance from these islands to the nearest of those islands lying adjacent to the coast of the 
mainland is from 60 to 70 miles across an open stretch of water — Hecate straits — sufficiently 
open to the Pacific ocean to share its waves and winds, which have proved enough of a 
barrier to prevent much intercourse by small boats between these islands and the mainland, 
while, until within the past year, communication by steamer was only to be had once a month. 
These islands, so commandingly situated off the main coast, have therefore remained sufficiently 
terra incognita to stimulate the imagination and create much interest. 

In the earlier days the Queen Charlotte Islands were peopled by the Haida Indians — the 
finest and most warlike tribe in British Columbia — whose raids and incursions into the 
districts of the mainland and Georgia straits, with, in many cases, the decimation of the tribes 
in these districts, forms an important part of the Indian history of the province. The warlike 
character of the Haidas, coupled with the remote and insular position of the district, has 
undoubtedly deterred prospecting or any very close investigation, as is evidenced by the fact 
that the islands are to-day practically uncharted, save in a very approximate way. 

The outline of the west coast of the islands, as shown on the Admiralty charts, is from a 
rough survey made by Vancouver in 1793, while cruising along the coast in a sailing ship. 
The east coast line is a little more accurately marked, as this was investigated in 1878 by the 
late Dr. G. M. Dawson, of the Geological Survey, who made a rough reconnaissance survey, 
the comparative accuracy of which, though a tribute to that wonderful explorer, still leaves 
much to be desired. 

* The boundaries of this Mining Division were somewhat altered by an Order in Council gazetted May 
3rd, 1906, a copy of which follows : — 

"Skeena Mining Division. 

" Starting on the International boundary in Dixon's Entrance opposite Cape Muzon ; thence easterly 
and northerly along said International boundary to the height of land between the Unuk River and 
Iskut river ; thence north-easterly, following the height of land dividing the drainage area of the Stikine 
river on the north from the drainage area of those .streams emptying into the Pacific Ocean south of Portland 
canal to a point where such height of land intersects the height of land separating the watershed of the 
Skeena river on the east from the Nass river on the west ; thence following the height of land between said 
rivers to a point where such height of land joins the height of land forming the north-western boundary of 
the watershed of the Kitsumgallum river ; thence along this latter divide to a crossing of the Skeena river 
three miles below the mouth of the Copper (Zymoetz) river ; thence south-easterly along the height of land 
separating the drainage area of the Copper (Zimoetz) river from that of Thornhill creek ; thence continuing 
southeasterly along the height of land between the Copper (Zimoetz) river and its tributaries on the north- 
east and the Kitimat River on the south-west to a point on the height of land dividing the drainage area of 
Gardner canal on the west and the tributaries of the Nechako river on the east to a point on the height of 
land separating the drainage area of Gardner canal and its tributaries on the north from that of Dean canal 
and its tributaries on the south ; thence south-westerly, following the height of land to a point north of 
Salmon bay opposite Oscar pass ; thence through Oscar pass and Millbank sound, passing south of Price 
island ; thence westerly, passing to the south and west of Queen Charlotte islands ; thence northerh' to the 
point of commencement in Dixon's Entrance." 

By a subsequent Order in Council passed in April, 1908, and taking effect on May loth, 1908, the 
Queen Charlotte group of islands was detached from the Skeena Mining Division and formed into a separate 
Mining Division under the name of the Queen Charlotte Mining Division, of which the Mining Recorder's 
office is to be at Jedway, on Harriet harbour, in the southern part of Moresby island. 



L 58 Report of the Minister of- Mixes. 1908 



Historical. 

The early voyages of discovery to the vicinity of the Queen Charlotte islands, and in fact 
the entire northern Pacific coast, were all in search of a supposed northern passage for vessels 
from the Atlantic to the Pacific ocean — in other words, a short waterway from Europe to 
China. 

As early as 1592 the Spanish Viceroy of Mexico fitted out an expedition for this purpose 
under Juan de Fuca, who sailed as far north as Vancouver island, although it is not known 
that he ever reached the Queen Charlotte islands. 

In 1639 the Court of Spain appointed Bartholemew de Fonte to command a squadron, 
fitted out in Peru, which sailed in 1640. In June, 1640, he records entering an archipelago 
of very many islands, called by him St. Lazarus, in latitude X.53 3 — the latitude of the centre 
of the Queen Charlotte group — and that he sailed for many leagues through intricate channels 
between islands. These may have been the Queen Charlotte islands, but some doubt has been 
entertained as to the accuracy of both these early voyagers. 

In 1774, Juan Perez, in the Spanish corvette "Santiago," saw and named the north cape 
of Queen Charlotte islands Cape de S. Margarita, but, finding no anchorage, did not land. 

In 1775, another Spanish expedition, under Bodega and Maurelle, coasted along the 
shores of the islands but did not land. 

In 1787, Dixon, in the British ship "Queen Charlotte," spent over a month on the coast 
of the islands, tracing the west coast from the north to the south end and sailing up the east 
coast as far as as Gumshewa inlet, and named the group of islands after his ship. He traded 
with the Indians, buying furs, etc., the real object of his voyage. 

During the next few years the islands were frequently visited by fur traders in British, 
French, Spanish and American vessels. 

In 1792, Capt. George Vancouver, in H.M.S. "Discovery," arrived on the west coast of 
America, and during the next three years was engaged in a series of surveys and explorations 
which to-day form the basis of our present charts of the west coast of these islands. 

Attention seems to have been withdrawn from the islands with the abandonment of the 
search for the " XorthAVest Passage," until 1S52, when H.M.S. "Thetis" visited the islands 
on a surveying expedition, followed, in 1853, by H.M.S. "Virago," and by H.M.S. " Alert " in 
1860. 

"In 1852, the Hudson Bay Company despatched a party of men in the brig ' Una,' Cap- 
tain Mitchell, to discover the locality from which several specimens of gold had been brought 
by the Indians. This was found to be on Gold harbour, in Kuper inlet, on the western coast 
of Moresby island. The gold was found in a small irregular vein, which soon proved to ' run 
out' in every direction. The quantity of gold obtained by the expedition was considerable, 
but has been variously stated. The enterprise was soon abandoned, but the discovery for a 
time created quite a furore — the first gold excitement in British Columbia — and the locality 
was visited by a number of miners, but with no further success." 

As to the amount of gold actually obtained in this first expedition, no very authentic data 
is obtainable ; tradition makes it very large, but Major Downie, mentioned further on, who 
visited the locality a few years later on a similar errand, places the amount at 85,000. 

In 1859, Major William Downie, a miner, with a party of 27, in a schooner, under Capt. 
Robinson, went to Gold harbour, and he records in his book " Hunting for Gold " that the 
party found quartz but no amount of gold. They " examined the spot where a large quantity 
of gold had been taken out some time before, but could not find anything worth working." 



8 Ed. 7 Cassiar District. L 59 



Major Downie, however, reports that he found coal on Skidegate inlet, and he is the first to 
have mentioned its existence on the islands. He, however, did not follow up his discovery, 
but soon left for the mainland. 

"About this time a Capt. Torrens also went with a party to prospect on the Queen 
Charlotte islands, and narrowly escaped massacre by the Skidegate Indians." 

In 1862 the " Queen Charlotte Mining Company " was formed in Victoria, and a party of 
men under Mr. Francis Poole — an Englishman, claiming to be a mining engineer — was sent 
north, landing on Skincuttle island in the inlet of that name, on which island and the adjoining 
island, Burnaby, they remained until 1864, engaged in prospecting. Their prospect shafts, 
etc., are still visible to-day and have been re-staked by present-day prospectors, more, it seems, 
on their historic fame than on the amount of mineral visible. Mr Poole gives an account of 
his expedition in a book, "Queen Charlotte Islands," published in London in 1872. 

So far as known, this constitutes the sum of the recorded early prospecting ventures on 
the Queen Charlotte islands. That there have been some unrecorded ventures is evidenced by 
the fact that at Copper bay, some nine or ten miles south of the Sand Spit, there is the remains 
of an old shaft, now being unwatered and cleaned out, which has been proved to be at least 
100 feet deep, and of which there is no record. Even traders who have frequented the islands 
for 25 years say the Indians know nothing of its origin or by whom the work was done ; a 
tree, growing on an old dump, would indicate that it was over 40 years ago.* 

Despite the fact that the early prospectors had all found enough to indicate the probability 
of extensive mineralisation on the islands, for many years these early discoveries were not 
followed up and little or no serious prospecting took place. It was only when attention was 
focussed on this northern part of the coast, by the location therein of the terminus of a trans- 
continental railway, that the Queen Charlotte islands again received attention from the pros- 
pector, and the more valuable discoveries that have been made have been all located within 
the last two years, many within the past year. Consequently, it is not to be wondered at 
that, up to the present, little more than very meagre development work has been done on the 
various claims recorded. In addition to this fact, the area found to contain mineral is so 
extensive that prospectors, having performed sufficient work on their respective claims to hold 
them for the year, have stopped at that and spent their time in trying to locate further mineral 
deposits. 

As a result, it was found on examination that, with one or two exceptions, there were 
to be seen only surface prospects, of which no very definite future can be foretold ; the most 
that can be done is to point out the probabilities from such indications as have been disclosed. 

As was natural, when prospecting was resumed, it began in the vicinity of the indications 
found many years ago, and has proceeded along the " line of least resistance," that is, in the 
direction from the initial point which could most easily and safely be reached by small boats. 

Skincuttle inlet was the starting point, and the majority of the claims so far staked have 
been in the bays or harbours opening off this inlet, viz., Huston harbour, Harriet harbour, 
Ikeda bay and Collison bay, with a few, and, at present, not so important localities farther 
south. 

From Skincuttle inlet prospecting continued north, and some important locations have 
been made along the east coast from Klunkwoi bay to Gumshewa inlet, in a formation quite 
different from that found in the vicinity of Skincuttle inlet. As yet, all the locations have 
been made close to the sea shore, within distances that could be reached in a day from a boat. 

The formation, which has been found copper-bearing, at Klunkwoi and Gumshewa bays, 
appears to continue N.W., parallel to the length of the island, and is again found on the north' 



L 60 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



end of Moresby island, on Skidegate channel, between the Narrows, where also it is impreg- 
nated with copper, but whether the metal is here in commercial quantities has not yet been 
demonstrated. 

Geological Observations. 

The first geological examination made of the Queen. Charlotte islands was in 1872, when 
Mr. James Richardson, of the Geological Survey of Canada, visited certain coal mines on 
Skidegate inlet. Mr. Richardson's time was limited to a few days and his examination did 
not extend beyond the vicinity of Skidegate inlet. 

In 1S78, Dr. George M. Dawson made an examination of the east coast of the main islands: 
the full text of his report may be found in the Report of the Geological Survey of Canada for 
1878-9. The following extract from Dr. Dawson's report bears upon the geology of Moresbv 
island : — 

" The mountainous axis of the Queen Charlotte islands, from Cape St. James to Skidegate 
channel (Moresby island), and probably still farther northward as far as Hippa island, is 
composed of a mass of much disturbed, and in some places highly altered, rocks, which have at 
first sight an appearance of great antiquity, but are found on closer inspection to owe this 
appearance to the inclusion of great masses of easily altei'ed contemporaneous volcanic materials, 
and to the fact that they have been subjected to an extreme of flexure and disturbance which 
very frequently takes the character of actual fracture and displacement, as has been observed 
elsewhere on the Pacific coast. To work out the intricacies of these older rocks, which may be 
looked on as the nucleus of the islands, would be a work of time and would involve much 
patient labour. 

"In a preceding report on British Columbia it lias been found necessary to include for 
the present the Palaeozoic and Triassic rocks under a single heading. They lie together, 
unconformably, beneath well-characterised Cretaceous beds, but are so much involved that no 
attempt has been made to separate them except locally. In the southern part of the interior 
of British Columbia both Carboniferous and Triassic fossils have been found among these older 
rocks, but no forms of greater antiquity. In the Queen Charlotte islands, now reported on» 
fossils have been discovered in the rocks unconformably underlying the Cretaceous in a number 
of places. These serve to characterise a certain zone of argillites and limestones, which is 
frequently repeated in sections along different parts of the coast, as distinctively Triassic ; and 
shows it to represent the so-called Alpine Trias, which is so largely developed in California and 
Nevada. No forms distinctively Carboniferous or Palaeozoic have yet been discovered, but 
from the intimate association of Carboniferous and Triassic rocks in the southern interior of 
the Province, and more particularly from the occurrence of a great mass of rocks largely 
volcanic in origin and believed to be Carboniferous in age, in the southern part of Vancouver 
island — which forms part of the same axis of elevation with the Queen Charlotte islands — it 
is highly probable that rocks of this age may come to the surface in some places. 

"The limestones of these localities may, therefore, possibly be of Carboniferous age, and 
if so, a large portion of the associated rocks of volcanic origin must be attributed to the same 
period. As it is at present impossible to unravel the structural complexity of the sub-Creta- 
ceous rocks of the islands, it has been thought best to colour them together on the map as 
Triassic, in correspondence with their characteristic fossils." 

In 1905, Dr. R. W. Ells, of the Geological Survey, made an examination of the northern 
large island of the group, Graham island, his work being practically confined to the coal- 
bearing formation of Graham island and its environment. Dr. Ells' report is to be found in 
Part B. of Vol. XVI. of Reports of the Geological Survey, while a summary of his report has 
been reproduced in the report of this Bureau for the year 1906, on pages 74 et seq., together 
with a map of Graham island. 



8 Ed. 7 Cassiar District. L 61 



In 1901, Mr. H. Carruichael, Provincial Assayer, made an examination for this Bureau of 
certain of the islands near and of the east coast of Moresby island. His report is to be found 
in the Report of the Minister of Mines for 1901, on pages 999 et seq. 

In 1902, Dr. T. R. Marshall, D. Sc, M. I. M. M., of Glasgow, on behalf of this Bureau, 
made an examination of the coal prospects in the interior of Graham island. His report is 
contained in the Report of the Minister of Mines for 1902, on pages 54 et seq. 

Climate. 

The climate of Moresby island is particularly favourable to prospecting and to subsequent 
mining operations, since in summer it is never very warm, while in winter there is seldom 
snow or frost in the lower lands, although both are to be found on the higher mountains, the 
highest peaks retaining snow-caps well into the summer. 

The west coast of the island is always dangerous to approach owing to the rocky character 
of its shores and the prevailing west wind, causing an ever-present ocean swell, which renders 
landing from a small boat very difficult except in the sheltered bays, and these bays, though 
quite numerous, are still uncharted and unknown save to a few prospectors, who have bought 
their knowledge by hard experience. 

The east coast is in summer usually safe, as it is protected from the west wind by the 
main island, and the fringe of smaller islands along its shores affords some protection, and 
offers ample refuge, from all winds, the inner passage being always navigable for small boats. 

The warm winds off the Pacific, striking the high mountainous backbone of the island, 
produce in winter a great deal of rain and in summer a mist, which, however, seldom develops 
into fog. 

As compared with the shores of Vancouver island, those of Moresby island are compara- 
tively free from troublesome underbrush. 

The timber, though small for lumbering, is admirable for mining purposes, and is very 
plentiful, while the damp climate does away with the dangers of forest fires. 

There is little soil to hamper prospecting, the surface being, however, heavily carpeted 
with moss. 

Game. 

Game on the island is unusually scarce, there being no deer, rabbits or even squirrels, 
while grouse are not plentiful, which fact is strange, seeing that the natural enemies of these 
animals, the wolves, coyotes and foxes, are also unknown on the island. Bear are present, 
but not plentiful. There is no area in the Province so well suited for a game preserve — the 
climate, topography, vegetation and position are ideal — and the island should be stocked and 
placed under reserve. 

Nature has, however, somewhat compensated for the dearth of land game by the bounteous 
supply of fish found in the sea and small streams, and the clams, rock oysters, abalonies and 
other shell-fish along the sea-shore. 

Skixcuttle Inlet. 

As already remarked, the greater amount of prospecting that has been done on Moresbv 
island is in the vicinity of Skincuttle inlet, which was in 186 2 the scene of early prospecting. 
The general geological formation of almost all Moresby island has been placed as Triassic by 
Dr. Dawson, with a possibility of some Carboniferous measures. Lithologically, the formation 
was originally composed of limestones, shales, etc., with heavy deposits of volcanic matter 
from some local point of issue. 



L 62 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1908 




On the lower end of Moresby island, as seen in the exposures in the various harbours 
bordering on Skincuttle inlet, whatever may have been the original formation, it has been 
subsequently subjected to such an upheaval, with the accompanying faulting and bending, and 
has been so cut by innumerable feldspathic dykes, that no sign of the original formation was 
traceable. The dyke intrusions are so numerous and extensive as to form the greater part of 
the rock mass, the sedimentary rocks showing as patches, or isolated masses, without any 
apparent relation to the next. 

The important part, however, is the existing mineral deposits rather than the geological 
formation, and from the number of mineral locations seen it would appear as though the whole 
promontory between Huston inlet and Carpenter bay was extensively mineralised, the locations 
so far made simply serving as an index to its general character. The first locations in recent 
years were made on the shores of Harriet harbour, from which point prospecting extended to 
Ikeda bay and Huston inlet, and later to Collison bay and Carpenter bay. 



8 Ed. 7 



Cassiar District. 



L 63 



The mineral claims examined in this vicinity during this trip were all within the area 

mentioned. Speaking generally of these claims the mineralisation is always found in the 

immediate vicinity of, if not in the actual contact of, limestone with one of the larger dykes 

and consists primarily of magnetite, with a greater or lesser amount of chalcopyrite and 

occasionally considerable pyrrhotite. 

Ik eda Bay. 

The Japanese firm of Awaya, Ikeda &, Co., of Vancouver, originally interested in the 
fishing off the Queen Charlotte islands, has staked claims on all the hills surrounding Ikeda 
bay, and this Company was found to be the only one on the island making any serious 
attempt at mining. It is employing more than 100 men, mostly Japanese, in mining, mining 
construction and prospecting the claims already staked. 

At the inner end of the bay the company has erected a large and substantially built 
wharf, capable of receiving the largest of the coasting steamships. Connecting the wharf and 
the mine workings a 36-inch gauge tramway has been built, over which, on cars drawn by 
horses, the ore is brought down for shipment. 

While some development work has been done on all the Company's 
Lily Group. holdings in the vicinity, the greater amount and all actual mining has been 
focussed on the Lily group, which consists of eight claims, the Lily, Sweet 
Pea, Apple, Carnation, Orchid, Lemon, Peach and Pansy. The development work for the 
group has been performed on the Lily, upon which the most available outcrop appeared 
This outcrop showed up in a small creek, the water of which had washed clear an outcropping 
of magnetite carrying chalcopyrite. This outcrop occurs in places along the actual contact and 
elsewhere near the contact of limestone and an igneous rock, apparently a diorite, there being 
evidence of much movement and some faulting. This deposit, as is the nature of such 
deposits, does not assume the characteristics of a fissure vein, and is not very clearly defined, 
nor is it of uniform width or tenure of copper. 



LILY MINE. IKEDA BAY 

END OF YEAR 1907 



At, / Ore Bunke 




A/o./AJir, I It Feet 



Lon gti T u d i n a I Section ofU/orkinq. 






A/c H AcY, f, 8 3 Fc 

A/c J AJ,r. 214 /-hof. 



L G4 Report of the Minister of- Mines. 1908 



The development consists of what is called No. 1 tunnel, which is really an open cut in 
the creek-bed along a contact of limestone and diorite, much altered, along which is a deposit 
of magnetite with copper pyrites ; this has been exposed by the work done for some 30 or 40 
feet, and has a width of from one to two feet. It would be difficult to estimate the copper 
contents of the exposed ore body, as this mineral is far from uniformly disseminated through- 
out the lead, occurring sometimes in bunches of quite rich ore, again scattered through the ore 
body, while in places the magnetite is practically barren. 

Some 400 feet farther down the creek is the No. 2 tunnel, and here most of the development 
work has been done, and all the mining, some 700 tons of copper ore having been shipped from 
this opening in 1907, assaying about 9 % copper, 3.5 oz. silver, and 0.25 oz. gold to the ton. This 
tunnel had been driven in on the strike of and following the vein for some 160 feet in a S. 10° 
E. direction. For the first fifty feet the ore has been stoped out up to the surface, the hanging- 
wall, dipping at an angle of about 80°, being supported by timbers, although in the tunnel 
proper no timber is required. The tunnel is about ten feet wide, and in places the vein-matter 
occupied pretty well the whole face of the drift. 

In the latter part of August the face of the drift was not in ore, the vein having been 
temporarily lost, but when the property was again visited about two weeks later, it was found 
that a cross-cut had been driven to the left, towards the hanging-wall, in which the vein had 
been again found and the main drift was being deflected to pick it up. 

The ore from the tunnel is run out on cars and dumped on to an incline, at the bottom of 
which is a picking shed, where the ore is broken and hand-sorted, the sorted ore being sacked 
and run down to the dock on cars drawn by horses, a distance of little over a mile, in which 
distance there is a drop of about 300 feet. On each car two tons of ore are carried, and one 
horse is required to bring back the empty car ; a driver takes down two cars at a trip. 

All the work about the mines is performed by Japanese. The miners working " single 
handed " are very efficient and compare favourably with the average white miner at this class 
of work, but the timbermen work very slowly. 

Some 100 feet from No. 2 tunnel, and 65 feet lower down, No. 3 tunnel has been started 
and has been laid out as the main working tunnel, the entrance being very heavily and solidly 
timbered where it runs through the gravel surface wash. This tunnel had, in August, only 
been driven through the wash to solid formation in w r hich no w T ork had then been done. 

There were employed in actual mining operations : — At No. 1 tunnel, about 14 men; at 
No. 2 tunnel, about 12 men; at No. 3 tunnel, about 8 men. 

The same Company has also staked out the Chrysanthemum group of 
Chrysanthemum eight claims, viz.: — Peony, Chrysanthemum, Rose, Violet, Cherry, Apricot, 
Group. Bamboo and Maple mineral claims. This group is located on the south- 

west side of Ikeda bay, at an elevation of about 400 feet above, and about 
half a mile back from the sea ; the approach being a gradual slant. On the Chrysanthemum 
mineral claim there is a large exposure of mineral, some 50 feet long by 20 feet wide and 
about 15 feet high, consisting of four feet of nearly solid magnetite, with a small percentage 
of iron sulphide, between defined Avails of diorite, and dipping nearly vertical, with strike 
north and south. 

Lying adjacent to this, and to the east, is a zone of from 4 feet to 8 feet wide of magnetite 
of a much finer grain, but not as pure, being considerably impregnated with iron pyrites and 
some copper pyrites. The amount of sulphide in this latter zone is so high as to render it 
valueless as a commercial iron ore, whereas, as far as developed, the percentage of copper is 
too low to be profitably worked. 





B.C. Bureau of Mines. 



ROCK FORMATION-ENTRANCE IKEDA BAY, Q. C. I. 





aCBur^.ofMi*,*. ] 



TUNNEL, MEAL TICKET M. C, COLLISON BAY, MORESBY ISLAND. 



8 Ed. 7 Cassiar District L 65 



On the Rose mineral claim, of the same group, there is naturally exposed in a bluff a mass 
of magnetite which, on the surface, is some 20 feet high and 50 feet long. This occurs along 
a diorite-limestone contact, the ore lying nearly horizontal underneath the limestone. In the 
limestone there is a cave, which was followed in, and up, for over 50 feet, formed by the leaching 
of a stream of subterraneous water, and in this there is considerable hydrated iron oxide. 

At other points in the group, higher up the hill, there were seen a number of smaller 
exposures of magnetite, all of which are quite undeveloped or even explored, so that it is quite 
impossible to say whether the various outcrops and exposures are in any way related or 
connected. 

Speaking generally, the explorations made indicate that the group contains a great deal 
of mineralisation, masses of magnetite of undetermined sizes, all carrying an appreciable 
percentage of sulphides of iron and copper, but in no instance has copper in marketable 
quantity been discovered. 

The Lotus group, consisting of six mineral claims and also owned by 
Lotus Group. the Awaya-Ikeda Company, is located on the south-east side of Ikeda bay, 
about half a mile back from the shore and at an elevation of some 500 feet 
above the sea. The mineral here exposed is pyrrhotite, the magnetic sulphide of iron, of 
which a very large body has been exposed with comparatively little work. This exposure is 
about 20 feet wide and is visible for a height of 20 feet, while 15 feet more depth of mineral 
is reported as covered by the dump made in the work done. This mass of mineral is bounded 
on either side by diorite country rock, the contact of which with the pyrrhotite is not sharply 
defined, but is a gradual replacement. Included in the mineral mass are bunches of limestone, 
although solid limestone formation was not visible. A sample made up of fragments broken 
from the various large pieces of mineral on the dump assayed three quarters of one per cent, of 
copper, with traces of gold and silver ; while an average sample broken from the exposed face 
assayed: Copper, 0.4%, with traces of gold and silver. The work done on the group was 
also more of an exploratory nature than development work, and while the great mass of mineral 
exposed has no present economic value, it strongly emphasises the extensive mineralisation of 
the vicinity and encourages further exploration of the group and its surroundings. 

Collison Bay. 

Collison bay lies next to Ikeda bay to the south-east and is separated therefrom by a 
range of mountains forming a narrow neck of land running out into Skincuttle inlet. 

On August 26th, a gasoline launch was taken from Ikeda bay around to Collison bay 
but, unfortunately for the writer, the prospectors interested in claims there were absent from 
their claims and cabins, and it was with some difficulty, and much uncertainty, that the various 
claims mentioned were found ; therefore, it is quite possible that there may be some confusion 
in the names of claims seen and that some of the workings may have been overlooked. 

The Meal Ticket mineral claim and the adjoining claim, the Cash Box' 
Meal Ticket. are located on the north side of Collison bay, about 280 feet elevation and 
about one third of a mile back from the water. The claims are reported as 
located by E. J. Leckie in October, 1906. On the Meal Ticket a tunnel has been driven in 
about 33 feet, and at 21 feet in cuts obliquely a four-foot lead of pyrrhotite, which continues 
on the left side of the tunnel to the face. The tunnel having been deflected to the right where 
the mineral was struck, has consequently not cut through the lead, and the thickness of the 
lead must be inferred from its outcrop on the surface, to the left of the tunnel mouth, at which 
point a fault plane is observed, along which the lead has been shifted a couple of feet north 
and its continuation to the east is seen in the dump in the mouth of the tunnel. A general 
sample of the pyrrhotite exposed was taken and assayed less than half of one per cent, copper, 



L 66 Report of the Minister of. Mines. 190S 



with traces only of gold and silver. The country rock in the vicinity of the tunnel is very 
much altered volcanic rock, probably originally a diabase. 

To the north of the tunnel, and on the Cash Box mineral claim in the cliff, there is, over 
a length of 100 feet, an exposure of magnetite carrying a considerable percentage of sulphides, 
chiefly pyrrhotite with some chalcopyrite. 

To the north of the previously mentioned claims, and at an elevation 

DeakirTs Claim, of some 200 feet above sea level, there is an exposure of highly crystalline 

limestone cut by a number of small diorite dykes, along the contact of 

which was a small amount of copper pyrites. Some of these contacts have been exposed 

along the course of a small creek — dry in summer, on which an open cut some eight to ten 

feet long had been made. No sample was taken of the mineral exposure. 

Harriet Harbour. 

Harriet harbour lies to the west of Ikeda bay and to the east of Huston inlet, and is 
separated from each by mountains which run out into the sea in narrow arms, not over a mile 
wide at the head of the harbour, but two or three miles long. 

The townsite of Jedway, with a wharf, store, Post Office, and several cabins, has been located 
on the south-west end of Harriet harbour, and here the office of the Mining Recorder of the 
district is situated. It was on the shores of this bay that the first of the more recent mineral 
discoveries of the district were staked, by Watson and Thompson, in 1905. These discoveries 
may be considered the origin of the present activity in Moresby island. 

Probably the best known claim on this harbour is the Copper Queen, 
Copper Queen, now held under bond by J. S. McMillan, of Seattle. The claim is situated 
on the south-west side of Harriet harbour, some 5,000 feet from the water 
and 880 feet above it. On this claim, as on most of the claims in the district, the mineralisa- 
tion consists of magnetite carrying variable amounts of copper pyrites, and upon the percentage 
of this latter mineral found depends the value of the deposits. When visited, the only 
development work done consisted of a large open pit in a small draw, made to expose and 
develop an exposure of magnetite found in a bluff on one side of the " draw." The work had 
succeeded in exposing a very considerable body of magnetite in a country rock, which appeared 
to be a much altered diabase. In the side of the cut there was visibly exposed, dipping at an 
an<de of 48°, a body of magnetite 6 feet thick, of which the lower 4 feet 6 inches was almost 
solid magnetite, containing irregularly distributed bunches and stringers of copper pyrites. 
The upper 1 foot 6 inches of the ore body, although chiefly magnetite, was more mixed with 
rock matter and appeared to the eye to carry a lower percentage of copper. This face stood 
exposed for a height along its slope of 25 feet, with indications that it continued down under 
the dump and into the hill for some farther distance ; at its highest point the ore body came out 
practically to the surface. An average sample of the exposed face of the ore body was carefully 
chipped off across the whole six feet exposed and at different places in its length ; this sample 
assayed, copper, 1.4%, with traces of gold and silver. Some 50 to 75 tons of mineral was 
piled up on the dump, and this also was roughly sampled, giving about 1.5 % copper. 

Some little distance up the creek from the open cut, and also about 300 feet to the east, 
are bodies of limestone, although none show in contact with the ore body. 

On the opposite side of the draw, or gully, referred to, from the open cut, some little 
surface stripping has been done, showing further bodies of magnetite, the connection of which 
with the main body is somewhat obscure. 



8 Ed. 7 Cassiar District. L 67 



The Iron Mountain is another claim in the immediate vicinity, held 
Iron Mountain, by J. S. McMillan. On this but little actual development has been done, 
but stripping has exposed a similar body of magnetite of considerable size, 
showing copper pyrites along its margin. 

The Moresby Island mineral claim lies somewhat to the south of the 
Moresby Island. Copper Queen and is also held by J. S. McMillan. This claim overlaps to 
a considerable extent the Tate mineral claim, owned by T. J. Watson, as to 
the merits of which dispute no opinion is expressed. The first open cut seen showed a 
country rock consisting of a decomposed diabase or diorite, with a considerable quantity of 
secondary red garnets, in crystalline form, all showing copper stain and a small percentage 
of copper. 

In the second open cut, near where a fine-grained igneous dyke, of later origin, cuts through 
the country rock, there is a strong impregnation of iron pyrites and nearby a small seam of 
copper pyrites, while a certain amount of copper carbonate occurs in the rock matter, but no 
considerable body of ore has been exposed. A sample was taken of the exposed face of the 
cut, which gave, upon assay, copper, 2.7 %, wet assay, with traces of gold and silver. The face 
of the cut is about 10 feet long and 10 feet high, and was in at the bottom only 6 to 8 feet. 

The Reco mineral claim, held by J. S. McMillan, is located nearer the 
Reco. bottom of the hill, only 200 feet above and a quarter of a mile from the 

water. The country rock here is a much altered diabase, in which a deposit 
of magnetic iron, about 3 feet thick, is seen dipping into the hill at an angle of about 40°, 
accompanied by a black hornblendic dyke and overlayed l>y a close-grained silicious rock. The 
magnetite carries sulphides of iron and copper, the copper contents in the exposed face of the 
magnetite being estimated at from f to 1 % copper. The exposure was visible for some 50 feet 
up the bed of the creek and was fairly uniform in character. 

An inclined shaft had been sunk on the deposit and 3 sets of timbering, 5 feet apart, set 
up, below which the shaft is reported to have been sunk about 6 feet, but as it was full of 
water it could not be examined. A 16 h.-p. boiler and a steam drill were on the ground, 
covered by a rough board shed. This boiler had formerly been used in prospecting the claims 
farther up the hill. 

The Modoc mineral claim, also held by J. S. McMillan, lies about 

Modoc. 1,000 feet north of the Reco. Here there was visible, in the bed of the 

creek, an irregular exposure of impure magnetite, carrying a considerable 

percentage of iron sulphides and a very small percentage of copper pyrites. The deposit 

appears to be cut off by a dyke and no ore of commercial value was visible. 

Huston Inlet. 

Huston inlet lies immediately to the west of Harriet harbour and is a fine body of navigable 
water. Some little prospecting has been done on its eastern shore, on the range of hills which 
separates it from Harriet harbour, but the locality must as yet be considered as unexplored. 
The few recorded claims are quite unprospected and undeveloped, only a little surface scratching 
having been attempted. 

A small cabin, known as Camp Surprise, has been erected on North 

Gold Cliff. bay, a small arm of the main inlet, from which a crude foot-trail leads up to 

the Gold CUff mineral claim, a claim staked in the names of John McLennan, 

Smith and Frank Watson. Here, on a lime-diabase contact, dipping with the hill at an angle 



L 68 Report of the Minister of- Mines. 1908 



of 35°, and a strike S.W. and jS".E., there was visible a deposit consisting of 12 inches in thick- 
ness of magnetite, overlain by 24 inches of calcite, carrying copper pyrites and iron pyrites, 
and again, above this, a thin seam of quartz and calcite, fairly crystalline, and above these the 
country rock was exposed. This exposure was visible for some distance along a very steep 
hillside, the outcrop being nearly horizontal, broken somewhat by vertical faults which 
interfered with its continuity. Some bunches of very pretty copper ore were visible, but they 
were small. As a prospect, there is encouragement to some further development, but nothing 
so far shown has any economic values. An assay, showing considerable gold, was reported 
from the claim, but it has not been confirmed by any subsequent samples and is regarded as 
doubtful. 

The Gold Peak, an adjoining claim held by the same owners, was not visited, but was 
reported by Frank "Watson, one of the owners, to be about the same as the Gold Cliff, but 
with even less development done. 

On the opposite side of the valley of a small creek was the Surprise mineral claim, staked 
by Frank Watson and sold to C. H. Parks. It lies at an elevation of about 500 feet, and is 
three-quarters of a mile from the inlet, and is undeveloped. The ore, from samples seen, is 
pvrrhotite, carrying some copper pyrites. 

About a mile from the sea, and farther up on Thunder mountain, on the north bank of the 
creek, the Hercules, Ida and Dusk;/ Maiden mineral claims have been staked by McMillan, 
McEacheran and Frank "Watson, and on these one assessment has been recorded. These claims 
were not visited, but are reported to contain a deposit of magnetite carrying copper sulphides. 

BrjRXABY AXD COPPER ISLAXDS. 

The Red Raven mineral claim, on the south side of Copper island, 

Red Raven. a claim recently re-staked by Abe Johnson and so named by him, is of 

interest as having been the spot upon which Francis Poole and his party 

did their work in 1862-3, and where, about five years ago, a prospector named Abe Heino, 

having re-located the property, did considerable work, the remains of which are still visible 

and excite in visitors much curiosity as to " what he was driving at." 

Geologically, the island is very similar to that portion of Moresby island immediately 
to the south, and some two or three miles distant. The sedimentary rocks are so cut up by 
later volcanic rocks as to give the appearance of the limestones being the intrusions and the 
volcanics the country rocks. 

In a little cove running into the island some 30 to 40 feet, with nearly perpendicular 
walls and a rocky floor, submerged at high tide, a tunnel was driven from the level of the rock 
floor for a distance of 35 feet, and from this tunnel a cross-cut had been started off to the 
right, towards the water, for some 10 feet. The work had been done along a limestone 
diabase contact, along which was visible a little magnetite carrying some copper pyrites, but 
in no place was the mineralisation sufficient to be of any importance. The present owner has 
done no work on the property, the work seen having been done years previously. The 
property is interesting, as showing what Poole spent two years upon, while so many much 
more promising showings were " sticking out of the ground " within three or four miles, on 
the larger island. 

On Burnaby island more of the old work done by Poole in 18G3 was visible. On the 
south side of the island there was found a shaft, with very old timbers, sunk about 12 feet 
deep, which had followed down a limestone diabase contact on which a small quantity of 
copper sulphides was visible. Some short distance to the east, along the steep rocks of the 



H Ed. 7 Cassiar District. L G9 



shore, on a contact of crystalline limestone and trap rock, a shelf had been blasted out, 
sufficient for a foothold, from which a tunnel had been driven in for 12 feet, at the inner end 
of which was a winze nine feet deep. The contact carried a little copper pyrites and some 
magnetite, but was unimportant. It could not be learned if these old workings had been 
recently re-staked. 

The Sea King mineral claim is a recent staking on the south-west side 

Sea King. of Burnaby island, by Captain Locke, of the steamship ''Princess Beatrice." 

On the beach, between high and low water, there is exposed a contact of 

limestone and fine-grained trap, along which stands, exposed by action of the waters, a contact 

deposit of magnetite, from two to three feet wide, dipping at an angle of 80° to the west. The 

magnetite carries some iron pyrites and a small percentage of copper pyrites. 

In a small gulch, a short distance to the west, there is a light gray coloured igneous dyke, 
fairly crystalline, and showing some horneblende, having a width of four or five feet, containing 
some stringers of calcite and also some magnetite and copper pyrites. Some little surface 
stripping had recently been done, with an idea of tracing out the contact, which was found to 
contain some copper pyrites. 

On Skincuttle island was seen more of the prospecting work done by 

Skincuttle Island Poole in 1863, for the Queen Charlotte Mining Company, of Victoria. 

Claims. Here a shaft had been sunk about 15 feet deep, near which some open cuts 

had been made. The shaft was full of water, but had evidently been sunk 

down on one of the fissures exposed to the open cut, which was from 12 to 15 inches wide and 

contained a considerable percentage of iron pyrites and some copper pyrites. Messrs. Raper, 

Hamilton, Law, et al., of Texada island, had re-staked this property and did some work on it, 

but do not appear to have recorded the last work done. 

Klunkwoi Bay. 

On Saturday, August 31st, thanks to the courtesy of Mr. Ikeda, of the Ikeda Bay mines, 
the writer was loaned a gasoline motor boat with two men, and a start was made for a group 
of claims situated on Klunkwoi bay, at the north end of Darwin sound and inside of Lyell 
island. The passages inside of Burnaby and Lyell islands were taken, as being more pro- 
tected from wind and sea. This inside passage is at all seasons suitable for a small boat, 
although the channel inside of Burnaby island is only one fathom deep at low water and is 
most tortuous and difficult to follow. The distance from Ikeda bay to Klunkwoi bay is about 
45 miles, and the run was made in less than eight hours. 

None of the claims in this section of the island have been long staked 
Swede Group, the first being the Swede group, staked in Januarj 7 , 1907, by Larsen, Pear- 
son and Rogers. The group consists of eight claims, the Excelsior, Pearson, 
Larsen, Keystone, Bob, Anaconda, Seattle and J/omesfake mineral claims. The claims are so 
located as to cover a small peninsula projecting into Klunkwoi bay and separating two smaller 
bays or fiords. This peninsula is not over 2,500 feet across and rises to a height above the 
water of about 1,000 feet, the average slope of the hillside being about 46°, and this steep 
slope continues under the sea level, giving deep water at which any vessel can lie almost along 
the shore line. Although the claims had only been located for about six months, it was found 
that the owners had done a very considerable amount of development work, which, as far as 
it had progressed, proved more than encouraging. This work consisted of a number of open 
cuts running horizontally along the hillside at intervals from the sea-level to a height of 
700 feet above. These cuts are on tlje Larsen claim, and may be said to have prospected a 
strip of hillside about 250 feet wide extending from the shore up to an elevation of 700 feet. 



L 70 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



The line of these cuts continued over the hill on to the south slope, has been further prospected 
on the Anaconda claim, and found there to be similar in all respects ; therefore, it is to be 
presumed that the mineralised zone is continuous over the peninsula along the line prospected 
in a N. 63° E. direction. 

A short distance to the west of the workings a fault plane has cut across the peninsula, 
the line of its break showing clearly on the mountain side. To the west of this break the 
prospectors claim not to have found mineral, but it is suspected their investigation has not 
been very thorough, as the geological conditions are the same on either side of the break, and 
it has not been a channel of infiltration of mineral. The country rock right across the 
peninsula appears to be uniform and the same, a much altered diabase,* cut by a few later 
trap dykes, which, however, do not appear to have any effect upon the mineralisation. 

As far as disclosed in the cuts, the 4 or 6 feet of the rock lying next the surface contain 
very little mineral, but when this depth is reached the rock is found to become impregnated 
with copper pyrites and occasionally bornite, and this impregnation in the deeper cuts appears 
to be growing greater with depth as far as the work has proceeded ; this is, at the greatest, a 
depth of some 15 feet. Sometimes the chalcopyrite occurs in little granules, peppered all 
through the rock, and again it occurs in little veinlets, constituting an ore difficult to estimate 
the copper contents of by the eye. 

Samples were taken from the most extensive of the open cuts, viz., the one at an elevation 
of about 75 feet above the sea level ; of these a general sample gadded off the face over a 
distance of 75 feet horizontally, and for the height of the cut, except the upper "barren" six 
feet, gave upOn assay better than 2 % copper, with traces of gold and silver. 

Another sample, taken by the writer, and which was intended to represent ore as it 
would be roughly hand-picked, gave copper, 5.7 %, silver, 0.2 oz. to ton and trace of gold. 

A third sample, taken on the south slope of the peninsula from an open cut on the 
Anaconda claim, gave 2.9 % copper, with traces of gold and silver. 

The occurrence of the mineral is such as to render hopeless any form of water concentra- 
tion, and the ore would have to be smelted direct, but for such treatment it is admirably 
suited, as the gangue matter is self-fluxing and very easily melted. 

To summarise the situation, the claims have not as yet been developed sufficiently to 
absolutely prove their ultimate value. They are still only prospects, but the success attending 
the development done commands attention and gives promise of an exceedingly large, but low 
grade, deposit of copper ore. The location of the properties is ideal for the cheapest kind of 
mining, and the facilities for cheap transportation by vessel could scarcely be improved upon. 

The grade of the ore, as already noted, is low, probably not higher than 2 or 3 % copper, 
with little or no gold and silver values, but the fact is that the values have increased with 
depth, so far as development has proceeded. The unknown factors are, how deep will this 
improvement in values continue and how deep will the ore be found, which can only be deter- 
mined by development work. 

The Last Chance group of six claims, the Last Chance, Goodenough, 

Last Chance Group. Jumbo, All Bight, No Doubt and Star, owned by Messrs. Wintermute, 

McEachern and Jones, lies to the S.W. of and adjoining the Swede group 

near the shore of the next bay to the south. These claims are more recently located than the 

■'Microscopic examination made, by Dr. Dresser, of McGill University ( 4,613 J. — This is a massive, dark 
green, fine-grained rock, showing spots of epidote, and a few grains of pyrite and pyrrhotite. It is found to 
consist essentially of plagioclase, feldspar and pyroxene. There are also present accessor}' magnetite, as 
well as the secondary minerals, chlorite and leucoxene. No quartz or olivine could be found. The structure 
is ophitic, and the rock is consequently a diabase. 



8 Ed. 7 Cassiar District. L 71 



Sivede group and have not had the same amount of development work done, but such as has 
been done, a couple of large open cuts, discloses conditions almost identical with those found 
in the Sivede group, and, as the ore found is also in direct line with the mineralised zone on the 
Swede group, it is fair to suppose it to be a direct continuation of the Swede group deposit. 
The most important development work has been done on the Last Chance claim, at a distance 
of 1,600 feet from the bay, at an elevation of about 200 feet, and consists of an open cut in rock 
45 feet long in a N". & S. direction, across the ore body, and has a face of six feet in depth. A 
general sample, made up of small pieces broken off the ore already mined, gave, upon assay, 
copper, 2.7 %, silver, 0.4 oz. to ton, and trace of gold. 

The country rock has been classed, after microscopic examination, as a '■ Porphyritic 
diabase." f 

As far as the development has gone, these claims give promise similar to the Swede group, 
and the camp as a whole indicates the presence of very large quantities of low-grade copper ore. 
The deposits are so admirably situated for cheap mining and transportation, and the character 
of gangue matter is such as to permit of very cheap smelting, that it is estimated that such ore 
is well within the commercial limit and can be treated at a profit, despite the fact that there 
is no appreciable quantity of gold or silver present. 

The formation in which these deposits occur would appear to extend for a considerable 
width east and west, and is found again to the north-west on the shores of Skidegate channel 
near the Narrows, constituting a large area of territory which may prove productive, and is 
at least, well worth prospecting. 

This past summer a number of claims have been staked in the vicinity of the Swede group 
and farther up the coast, but, at the time, no work of any sort had been done on them and 
they were not visited. 

Old Shaft. 

On September 2nd, the trip northward was resumed in the gasoline launch to Skidegate, 
a further distance of 45 miles, a stop being made at the Old Shaft, some seven miles south of 
the Sand Spit. 

The Old Shaft, judging by the size of trees growing on the old dump, 

Old Shaft. was sunk some 40 to 50 years ago, but by whom it is not known, nor does 

there seem to be any Indian tradition regarding it. * The property has 

recently been taken up again by Shelden & Shabbard, who have bonded it to D. R. Young 

and associates, who were unwatering it, employing one white man and two Indians. At that 



fAs result of microscopic examination, Dr. Dresser, of McGill University, reports : — "The x-ock is fine 
grained and of a uniform green colour. The slide is found to be much decomposed. Feldspar is present in a few 
phenoerYsts and in more numerous small lathe-shaped crystals of plagioclase. There are numerous grains 
of augite and epidote with much chlorite, the latter being in larger irregular masses. It is a Porphyritic 
diabase. 

* Since the above report was written the following appeared in a local paper : — " In 1862 a miner from 
Australia arrived in Victoria with the intention of going to Cariboo, but as there was some excitement about 
copper on Queen Charlotte Island at that time, decided to try his luck in copper up there. On his arrival 
at Skidegate he prospected down the coast, and found the copper cropping on which he put down the 
mysterious shaft. He and'his men worked there to the end of the year, then came down to Victoria to 
spend the winter, and early in the spring of 1863 he returned to the mine, taking with him two shifts of 
men, in order to sink the shaft as rapidly as possible. In August, 1863, the writer was prospecting on Queen 
Charlotte Island and called at the shaft, which at that time was down about 60 feet, and the men were 
driving down night and day. In conversation with the owner, I stated : ' You have not much of a cropping 
of copper for going to so much expense.' He replied : ' I expect to strike a large body of copper when I 
get deeper.' But what he found deeper I do not know, but at the end of the year 1863 he covered up the 
shaft and came down to Victoria, and from there he started back to Australia ria San Francisco, and has 
not been heard of since. In conclusion, I may tell you that the Australian miner's name was Waddington, 
a nephew of Alfred Waddington, a pioneer of British Columbia, well known to all old-timers here. 

"C. McK. SMITH - ' 



L 72 Report of the Minister of- Mines. 1908 



date the shaft had been unwatered to about 90 feet depth, and the foreman reported having 
sounded it for a further depth of 45 feet. Some short distance above the 90-foot mark, two 
cross-cuts had been found, one to the east and one to the west, extending about twenty-five 
feet from the shaft. The shaft had not been cleaned out, so, of course, nothing was visible in 
it as to ore. 

The countr} r rock in the vicinity, as exposed on the beach, is an agglomerate, in which a 
fissure was seen a few inches wide, carrying copper pyrites in quartz. Selected samples of 
clear mineral assayed 10% copper and two oz. of silver to the ton. This fissure led directly 
to the old shaft, distant only a few feet, and it was evidently on this fissure that the shaft 
had been sunk and along which the two cross-cuts had been driven. The fissure, as seen on 
the beach, was too small to be of any importance, and the old dump exhibited no commercial 
ore. The owners claim to have discovered a more extensive fissure, running north and 
south — that is, at right angles to the first, at a distance of some 100 feet to the west of the 
shaft and in the woods — to which it is proposed to drive a cross-cut from the shaft at some 
depth. The white man in charge did not know where the exposure of this north and south 
vein was, and it was consequently not seen by the writer. 

Gold Harbour. 

Mr. John McLellan, a British Columbia Assayer, has been working during the past 
summer at Gold harbour, a bay of Moore channel, on the west coast of Moresby island, just 
south of Skidegate channel. It was at this point the Hudson Bay Company, in 1852, found 
and mined a deposit of gold-bearing quartz. Mr. McLellan examined the old workings but 
could find no continuation of the values, though he discovered in the vicinity another small 
quartz vein carrying gold in considerable proportions. He reports the vein as being rich but 
very small ; he erected last season an arrastra driven by water power and managed to extract 
a certain amount of gold, bringing a small " brick " to Victoria. 



SKEENA MINING DIVISION. 

Beport by AVm. Manson, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit the annual report on mining flperations in the Skeena 
Mining Division for the year 1907. 

During the year considerable interest has been manifested in mining in the district, and 
indications from various points give promise of important development in the near future. 

Two mines have made shipments during 1907 — the Outsiders mine, Maple bay, Portland 
canal, operated by the Brown Alaska Company, and the Ikeda mines, at Ikeda bay, Moresby 
island, operated by Aw ay a, Ikeda & Co., Ltd. Other claim owners are rapidly developing 
their properties, and it is expected before long that many mines will be added to the shipping 
list. 

Queen Charlotte Islands. 

Important mining activity is in progress on Queen Charlotte islands, principally on 
Moresby island. I have recently had an opportunity of visiting several of the properties at 
Jedway, Ikeda bay, and Klunkwoi bay, and was much impressed with the appearance of the 
mineral and with the confidence of the prospectors and mine-owners as to the future of this 
section. Much interest has been created by the recent discovery of coal, which is said to^be 
a coking quality, found in that vicinity. If this should prove to be a suitable coal, and in 
sufficient quantity, it would very materially aid in the development of mineral properties 
which will soon require facilities for smelting the ore on the ground. 




IKEDA BAY WHARF-MORESBY ISLAND, Q. C. I. 




TOWN OF SKIDEGATE, Q. C. ISLANDS. 



8 Ed. 7 Cassia r District. L 73 



At the present there are three Deputy Recording offices on Queen Charlotte islands ; one 
each at Masset and Skidegate, on Graham island, and one at Jedway, on Moresby island. 
The volume of business being done there, particularly at the latter point, will warrant the 
creation of a separate Mining Division for Queen Charlotte islands at an early date.* 

It is unnecessary for me to go into details in regard to the various properties at this 
point, as Bulletin No. 1, 1908, recently issued by the Provincial Mineralogist, gives full 
particulars. 

Bear River, Portland Canal. 

The principal development work at this point has taken place on Glacier creek, where 
the Portland Canal Mining and Development Co., Ltd., has sunk a shaft 75 feet in depth and 
has made several deep open cuts on its property, the Gipsy group. Three tunnels have also 
been run, respectively 26 feet, 115 feet and 120 feet, with cross-cuts from these tunnels 
aggregating 36 feet on the Little Joe claim. A favourable report has been made on this 
property by W. J. Elmdorf, a mining engineer of Spokane, Washington, a copy of which has 
been transmitted to you. 

The Columbia group, owned by Messrs. Rush and Bagg, is situated on the north fork of 
Glacier creek. A tunnel 28 feet long was driven last season, besides a number of trenches and 
open cuts. 

On the Lake View group, owned by Messrs. McKay and Ribeau, a shaft was sunk to the 
depth of 15 feet with a cross-cut at the bottom 10 feet, and an open cut on the ledge was run 
for a distance of 75 feet. 

Good values of gold and silver have been found on the Jumbo and Ben Bolt mineral 
claims, owned by Samuel Gourley. A considerable amount of work has been done on these 
two claims, as well as on the Rex, Ajax, Minnie and Maid of Erin. 

The Stewart Mining and Development Company recently acquired the property consisting 
of the claims Sundown, Sunbeam, Ben Hur and George E., on which a good deal of work has 
been done. It is the intention of this company to prosecute the operations during the coming 
season. 

A number of other claim-holders have done assessment work on their properties, the 
showings and values proving to their satisfaction. 

Bitter Creek. 

The Grizzley group of claims, owned by Messrs. Chambers and Rainey, is situated on this 
creek, on which a tunnel 20 feet long has been driven. 

American Creek. 

The American Girl group, situated on the above creek, has had additional tunnel work 
done for a distance of 20 feet and is again in ore. 

Salmon River. 

The Buena Vista grotjp and the Nabob mineral claim are situated on the Salmon river, 
and are owned by Lindeborg Bros. Thirty-two feet of tunnel work was done during the past 
year on the Buena Vista, and an open cut 12 feet long and 10 feet deep has been cut on the 
Nabob. These claims all show good values in gold, copper and silver. 

The foregoing are the principal properties at the head of Portland canal, which carry gold, 
silver-lead and copper ore. Quite a number of locations have been made during the year, and 
the outlook for the camp is very promising. 

See foot-note page. -37. 



L 74 Report of the Minister of- Mixes. 1908 

Maple Bay, Portland Canal. 
The Outsiders mine, at this point, was in operation for nearly two years by the Brown 
Alaska Company, and was making good progress as a shipping property until last October, 
when, unfortunately, owing to the financial depression and the fall in the price of copper, the 
management was compelled temporarily to cease operations. 

Observatory Inlet. 

A number of locations were made on Observatory inlet during the year. A deposit of 

molybdenum was discovered last fall on the Mammoth and Conundrum claims. 

The Hidden Creek group of mineral claims is considered a valuable property and recently 

changed hands at a good figure. 

Bella Coola. 

The Bella Coola section has recently been included in the Skeena Mining Division. 

Mining in this vicinity is comparatively new and previous to last year very little had been 
done. During the year 44 free miners' certificates were issued and 62 claims recorded. 

Development work has been done on the Sure Coj)per group, consisting of two tunnels 40 
feet and 100 feet long, respectively. On an average, 8 men have been employed during the 
season. 

The Bella Coola group of claims, owned by the Bella Coola Copper Co., Ltd., is situated 
on the north side of Burk channel, on the Bella Coola mountain. Considerable surface work 
and open cuts have been done on this property. 

KlTIMAT. 

A tunnel 155 feet long has been driven, with cross-cuts 17 and 24 feet ; also surface work 
and open cuts on the Golden Crown group of claims, owned by Messrs. Steele and Dunn. 

The Bimetallic group of claims is also situated at Kitimat, and is owned by Lindeborg 
Bros. During the last year a tunnel has been driven for a distance of 32 feet, making in all a 
tunnel of 72 feet. The ore-body is over 100 feet wide. 

The Deputy Recorder's office at this point has been closed for some time, but for the 
convenience of the people in this locality it should be opened again during the coming spring. 

From the sub-recording offices at Prince Rupert, Essington, Hartley bay and Unuk river 
there is very little new to report. Claims have been recorded, prospecting is going on, and the 
necessary assessment work is being done. 

Office Statistics — SKEENa Mixing Division. 

Free miners' certificates issued 578 

Mineral claims recorded 561 

Certificates of work issued , 373 

Bills of sale, bonds, etc., recorded 178 

Certificates of improvements 31 

Revenue. 

Free miners' certificates 82,501 45 

Mining receipts , 5,808 95 

Total 88,310 40 



8 Ed. 7 Cassiar District. 



OMINECA MINING DIVISION.* 



Report by F. W. Valleau, Gold Commissioner. (Office at Hazelton.) 

I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on the progress of mining in the 
Omineca Mining Division for the year ending December 31st, 1907. 

This year's report, I am sorry to say, must necessarily be very incomplete, on account of 
my only taking charge of my district on the 1st of September, arriving here about the middle 
of October, as I was detained at Essington for 12 days before I could procure a canoe and 
crew to take me up the Skeena river, all the steamers, as you are aware, having been either lost 
or put out of service during the past season. 

This Division being the largest one in the Province, and the distances so great between 
the sub-mining recording offices at St. John, Fort Grahame, and Stuart lake, with no 
communication between them and Hazelton either by travel or mail, I have not been able to 
hear from them as to what is being done in their sections, but I hope to gee returns from them 
during the winter, when I will forward them, to you in a supplementary report. 

In and around Manson, Slate and Lost creeks, the following work has been done during 
the past season : — 

The Kildare Gulch Mining Company, of Ottawa, had about 12 men engaged in prospecting 
its ground on Slate creek during the entire season, but, from what I have been able to learn, 
the returns for this season's work have not been satisfactory. I am sorry to have to report 
the death by drowning on the Skeena river of Mr. James Munroe, late manager for this 
company. 

Lost creek is being worked by Messrs. Steele, Martin and Mullon, who are on the ground 
this winter prospecting their ground by running a tunnel into the east bank above the canyon. 
A few Chinamen worked on Germansen creek this past season, but as they had gone down the 
river before I reached here I am unable to say what they took out. 

* The boundaries of this mining division have been somewhat altered by an Order in Council gazetted 
May 3rd, 1906, a copy of which follows : 

"Omineca Miming Division. 
"Commencing on the eastern boundary of the Province at a point where such boundary crosses the 
divide separating the drainage area of the Hay river on the north from the drainage area of the 
tributaries of the Peace river on the south ; thence westerly along height of land forming divide 
separating the drainage area of the Hay river and tributaries of the Liard river on the north 
from the drainage area of the Peace river on the south, to a point where such height of land 
intersects the height of land separating the headwaters of the Skeena river from the headwaters of 
the Stikine and Liard rivers ; thence south-westerly following the height of land separating the drainage 
area of the Skeena river on the east from the drainage area of the Naas river and tributaries on the west to 
the intersection of the height of land forming the north-western boundary of the watershed of the Kitsum- 
gallum river ; thence along this latter divide to a crossing of the Skeena river at a point three miles below 
the mouth of the Copper (Zymoetz) river ; thence south-easterly along the height of land separating the 
drainage area of the Copper (Zymoetz) river from that of Thornhill creek ; thence continuing south-easterly 
along the height of land between the Copper (Zymoetz) river and its tributaries on the north-east and the 
Kitimat river on the south-west to a point on the height of land separating the drainage area of Gardner 
canal on the west from the tributaries of the Nechako river on the east ; thence southerly and easterly 
following the height of land forming the west and southern boundaries of the watershed of the Nechako 
river above the junction of the Stuart to the crossing of the Nechako river at the mouth of the Stuart: 
thence easterly along height of land between the drainage area of the Nechako on the south and the Salmon 
river on the north, crossing the Salmon river at a point five miles from where the said Salmon river empties 
into the Fraser river and still following the height of land to a point between Summit lake on the north and 
the Fraser river on the south ; thence northerly and easterly along the height of land dividing the drainage 
area of the Fraser and its tributaries on the south from the drainage area of the Peace river and its tribu- 
taries on the north, continuing to a point where the southern boundary of the watershed of the Peace river 
is cut by the eastern boundaiy of the Province; thence north along such eastern boundary to point of 
commencement. " 



L 70 Report of the Minister of- Mines. 1908 



Tom creek is still being worked by the Messrs. May and Condit Brothers, who report 
that work has been carried on continuously from the opening of the season until the middle 
of October. The depth of ground averaged about 20 feet, 16 feet of which was removed by 
ground-sluicing, and the remaining 4 feet shovelled through the slices. Five men were 
employed throughout the season. This is the only property now being worked on this creek. 
The Messrs. May and Condit are also running a tunnel on the lower portion of their ground 
and are now in some 260 feet. 

Xo work has been done on Vital creek this summer by either of the two companies holding 
leases thereon, a couple of Chinamen being the only persons on this creek. 

In the Aldermere section of this Division there has been great activity in quartz mining, 
and a large number of very promising locations have been opened up, notably in the Howson 
basin, Telkwa valley, and the Hudson Bay mountain. A number of these claims have been 
bonded to outside capitalists and some of the bonds have been taken up. 

A new mineral zone has been discovered in the Babine range to the east of these camps, 
and some valuable finds are reported ; these also have been inspected by intending purchasers 
and some sales made. The nature of the ore found was galena and copper pyrites. 

The camps on the divide between the Telkwa and Zymoetz rivers have also had a large 
amount of development work done this season, and are reported to be showing some very fine 
ore. 

Work on the different claims at Ivitsilas canyon is progressing favourably, and these 
claims seem destined to become shipping mines when the Grand Trunk Railway is built. 

There has been a discovery of placer gold made in the Ingenika river this past season, 
which promises to be the making of a good camp there. The Jenson Brothers came through 
from there this past fall and reported having found good prospects on McConnell creek, a 
tributar\' of the Ingenika river, and have now returned to the creek with five miners and 
provisions for a year, to prospect the ground. 

Office Statistics — Omineca District. 

Mineral claims recorded 132 

Hydraulic leases applied for 2 

n ii issued 2 

Bills of sale (recorded) mineral 55 

Free miners' certificates 237 

ii ii ii (special) 1 

ii ii ii (company) 1 

Water records in force 7 

Certificate of work issued 163 

Mining receipts issued 317 

Payment in lieu of work ± 

Bills of sale 55 

Placer claims recorded 6 

Revenue Collected. 

Free miners' certificates (individual) 61,238 00 

ii n (company) 137 00 

Mining receipts, lease rentals 520 00 

Water rents 225 00 

Mineral claims recorded 337 50 

Payment in lieu of work 500 00 

Placer claims recorded 5 00 

Carried forward = 62,962 50 



8 Ed. 7 Cassiae. District. L 7i 



Office Statistics — Omineca District. — Concluded. 

Brought forward •?2,962 50 

Placer claims re-recorded 15 00 

Mining receipts, general 1,615 95 

Revenue tax , 360 00 

Trade licences 110 00 

Packers' licences ... 90 00 

Liquor licences 665 65 

Land revenue 1,878 00 

Timber dues 1,150 00 

Marriage licences 10 00 

Magistrate's Court 1,007 00 

Miscellaneous 1 50 

$9,865 60 

As regards the land revenue collected, I beg to point out that the total given here is only 
that collected by myself since being in charge of my District, the } T ear's collections from 
January to the end of August having been paid into the Port Simpson Office ; and as this 
has been a year when the land revenue has. been abnormally heavy, the returns from this 
District, as shown herewith, do not give credit to it anywhere near the amount due. I cannot 
close my report without making mention that to Mr. Kirby, Provincial Constable, who has 
been acting as Mining Recorder, is due a great deal of praise for the very perfect and efficient 
manner he has kept all mining records in this office for the past year. 



THE BULKLEY YxlLLEY, B. C. 

By W. \Y. Leach. 

(From Summary Report of Geological Survey of Canada, 1007.) 

According to instructions, work was continued in the Bulkley valley and vicinity during 
the past season. The topographical map compiled last year, and now in the engraver's hands, 
was used as a base, being extended both to the north and south, but chiefly to the north^ 
including the Bulkley valley as far as Moricetown, the Hudson Bay mountains and the head- 
waters of the Zymoetz (Copper) river, as well as some work done on the head of Paint creek 
and the Morice river. 

A carefully made transit and chain traverse was run from the town of Telkwa to Morice- 
town, as a check on the triangulation of last year. 

The season, on the whole, was unfavourable for topographical work, a late wet spring 
being followed by an exceptionally dry, hot summer, with, as the result, many forest fires and 
a dense, smoky atmosphere during the short season in which work is possible in the higher 
mountains. 

The greater part of the season was spent in the upper part of the Telkwa river and the 
country lying between that river and the Zymoetz ; this district has been very little prospected 
and the absence of trails made progress slow. 

Topography. 

The Telkwa, above the south fork, occupies a wide, flat valley, the river meandering 
through swampy meadows; its course here is approximately north-east and south-west. 
About twelve miles from the south fork, near Mill creek, the valley turns sharply to the south 



L 78 Report of the Minister of Mines. 190S 



and at the bend an unexpected and low pass leads off to the west to Summit creek, a branch 
of the Zymoetz ; this pass may be of great importance, for it has been occupied by one of the 
several surveyed lines of the Grand Trunk Pacific Ry. 

Milk creek rises in a high and rugged range of mountains forming the divide between the 
Zymoetz and the Telkwa rivers ; this range rapidly decreases in height to the eastward, 
forming a plateau-like country, where the highest point reaches an elevation of only 6,600 
feet, finally dropping down to a low pass, in which Pass creek rises, and which separates it 
from the Hudson Bay mountains. 

The last named range, though quite rugged, the highest points reaching at least 8,000 
feet, is cut off on all sides by low country and, therefore, forms a very conspicuous feature of 
the district. 

In most cases the headwaters of the Zymoetz occupy wide, flat valleys interspersed with 
many small lakes and much meadow land. 

The country, as a whole, with the exception of the Coast range, is characterised by a 
series of isolated groups of mountains surrounded by low valleys in which the river and creek 
systems have little regularity. 

Geology. 

By far the greater part of the country traversed is underlain, as described in last year's 
report, by rocks of the porphyrite group, mainly composed of andesites, tuffs, and agglomerates, 
and almost entirely of volcanic origin. 

From the head of Milk creek westward the rocks which are all of the Coast crystalline 
series, have not been studied in detail, no minerals of economic importance having yet been 
discovered in them. 

The most important rocks, from the miner's point of view, are those which have been called 
" the later eruptives," as all the important mineral discoveries of the district are situated in the 
volcanics near their contact with these rocks, or in or alongside dikes from their main bodies. 
These eruptives have also had an important influence on the quality of the coal. They constitute 
the youngest rocks of the country, cutting both the volcanics and the coal formation, and are 
found usually either as a pinkish syenite porphyry, or as a light greyish granite porphyry, the 
dikes from them varying greatly in appearance. 

Two important areas, one on Scallon creek, the other at the head of Glacier creek, were 
referred to last year. Another small area was noted on the ridge between Morice river and 
Goldstream, and yet another near the head of the north fork of the Telkwa ; little or no 
prospecting has been done in ths neighbourhood of either. A large area of these eruptives 
was found on the western ridges of the Hudson Bay mountains. This locality has received 
much attention of late and many mineral claims have been located. 

Mineral Claims. 

Immediately on arriving at Telkwa (at the mouth of the Telkwa river) a short trip was 
made to Hankin's camp, situated at the head of Goat creek, where a group of claims has been 
located by Messrs. Loring, Forrest and the Hankin brothers. These are among the oldest 
mineral locations in the district, and a good deal of prospecting, consisting of open cuts and 
several short tunnels, has been done on them. 

The country rock consists of typical beds of volcanics, tuffs, agglomerates, andesites, etc., 
belonging to the porphyrite group and here lying nearly horizontal and well exposed at many 
places on both sides of the rather deep, narrow valley. These beds are cut by a number of 
roughly parallel, light-coloured quartzose dikes with a nearly vertical dip and crossing the 
valley approximately at right angles. 



8 Ed. 7 Cassiar District. L 79 



The mineral deposits occur in nearly horizontal beds following the bedding planes of the 
volcanics and show decided enrichment in the immediate vicinity of the dikes ; the mineral 
bearing solutions have apparently ascended along the walls of the dikes and thence, following 
the bedding planes, have decomposed the more readily attacked volcanic beds. 

On the Eldorado, Naiad and Telkica claims the best showings of mineral are to be met 
with ; here at least two beds of ore, each about five feet in thickness, may be seen, consisting 
of iron pyrites, copper pyrites, a little pyrrhotite, and magnetite, in a gangue of altered country 
rock, epidote, quartz, etc. The percentage of copper is small, but, according to the owners, 
fair values in gold are to be found. The ore bodies are very much thicker in places, more 
particularly immediately alongside of the dikes. 

Many of the claims on Howson creek were described in last year's summary, but 
this locality was again visited this year, considerable development work having been done and 
various new claims located. 

At the Evening claim a cross-cut has been run for 70 feet in low-grade ore, the main body, 
exposed by cuts on surface, not having been yet reached. 

On the Duchess a tunnel has been driven for 60 feet, starting at a very good exposure of 
copper ore and following the foot-wall of the ore-bearing dyke. The ore is continuous for the 
length of the tunnel. Several open-cuts have been made up the hill on what is supposed to be 
the Duchess dike ; one of these shows six feet of good ore, the others very little, but the dike is 
much decomposed and iron-stained. 

There are a number of parallel dikes here, some of them ore-bearing, which have a general 
north and south strike, about at right angles to the direction of the valley. As the ground is 
mostly drift-covered, and the dikes are often quite close to one another, it is a difficult problem 
to ascertain, for any distance, which dike one is following. 

The Countess claim, owned by the same company as is the Duchess (The Telkwa Mines, 
Limited), is situated near the top of the ridge on what is probably a similar and parallel dike. 
An open cut has been made here, but not much ore is in sight ; a small cut, however, on the 
same dike at the top of the ridge has a much better appearance, the ore there being similar to 
that at the Duchess. 

Across the ridge, to the north, in a small basin in which rises a branch of Howson creek, 
a number of claims have been staked. Among these the Standard, Princess and Contention 
are also owned by the Telkwa Mines, Limited ; on only one of these, the Standard, was any 
work seen. It consisted of a small open cut showing from 18 to 20 inches of good ore, com- 
posed of chalcopyrite and specular iron with a little quartz. The ore occurs in a dike along 
the hanging wall. 

In this basin, as at the Evening and Duchess, a number of parallel dikes occur, with 
approximate north and south strikes and cutting the bedded volcanics ; the ore is found in the 
dikes, usually near the walls, and at times extends into the country rock. 

The Telkwa Mining, Milling and Development Company have also a number of claims 
here, among others the Whispering Wind and Silver Heels. On the latter a large dike from 
50 to 60 feet wide exists, striking north and south and clipping 75 to 80 degrees east ; on the 
easterly or hanging wall about 4 feet of chalcopyrite and specular iron ore was seen, but no 
work has been done; on the westerly wall, however, a large open cut shows 15 feet of good ore, 
consisting of chalcopyrite, specular iron and a little iron pyrites with a gangue of quartz and 
altered country rock. 

On the south side of Howson creek a number of claims owned by the Telkwa Mining, 
Milling and Development Company were visited, the most important being the Walter, Iron 
Coif, Granville, Strathcona and Anna-Eva. All of these were seen last year, and little has 
been done since. The ore occurs in dikes from the large porphyry area on Scallon creek cutting 



L 80 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



190S 



the rocks of the porphyrite group, and is generally much decomposed. A sample of black, 
earthy material from the Strathcona was found to consist of oxides of copper, manganese and 
iron. 

Most work has been clone on the Anna-Eva, an open cut over 150 feet in length having 
been made across the face of the dike. The mineralisation is irregular and not very heavy, 
and the whole dike is much decomposed, the ore consisting of copper carbonates, chalcopyrite, 
iron pyrites and specular iron. A short distance to the south, on top of the hill, where the 
ground is heavily drift-covered, a new cut had been started, showing much higher grade ore, 
chiefly chalcopyrite and specular iron with a good deal of quartz, across a width of about 25 feet. 

The Hudson Bay mountains were visited late in the summer, but as all the prospectors 
had left for the season, it was almost impossible to find where the chief claims were situated. 
However, a few were seen. 

At the head of Lyons creek, on the eastern slope of the range, two claims, the Copper 
Queen and Iron Mask, are near the edge of a small granite area cutting the volcanics, and the 
mineralisation appears to follow the bedding of the decomposed andesites. The ore consists 
almost entirely of arsenical pyrites in a quartzose gangue, but not enough work has been done 
to show the extent of the deposit. A specimen of this ore gave by assay : gold, 88 : silver, 
0.52 ozs. to the ton. 

About one mile down Lyons creek, on the south side, some work had been done, but the 
name of the claim could not be ascertained. The ore occurs in a large dike, about 75 feet wide, 
near the hanging wall, and shows about 3 feet of fairly well mineralised material consisting of 
arsenical pyrites, some copper carbonates and a very rusty quartz in bands parallel to the dike 
wall. 

On the western slope of the mountains, near the head of a small stream running into the 
Zymoetz river, the Tower Hill claim is situated. The country rock here, consisting chiefly of 
red and greenish andesites, has been tremendously disturbed, and some splendid samples of 
folding on a large scale may be seen. A number of open cuts have been made in what appears 
to be a thin bed of greenish andesite, much altered and containing some copper carbonates, a 
very little bornite, some quartz, calcite, epidote, etc. 

There are said to be other and better showings in this neighbourhood, but the writer was 
unable to find them. 

Coal. 

During the past year practically nothing has been done on the coal properties of the 
Kitimat Development Syndicate, the Cassiar Coal Company, or the Transcontinental Explora- 
tion Syndicate, all situated on the Telkwa I'iver or on Goat creek, one of its tributaries. L T ntil 
the route of the Grand Trunk Pacific railway is finally decided on, it is not probable that much 
development will be undertaken. 

On the property of the Telkwa Mining, Milling and Development Company, located on 
Coal creek, at the headwaters of the Morice river,, a little exploration work has been carried 
on, and the limits of this are fairly closely defined. Although the area is small, the coal is of 
very high grade, as the following analyses show : — 



All Non-Coking. 


Moisture. 


Volatile 

Combusti'e 

Matter. 


Fixed 
Carbon. 


Ash. 


1 . — "> ft. 6 in. seam 

2. — 7 ft. 3 in. seam 


1.36 
0.80 
0.58 


10.87 
11.10 
10. SO 


80.82 

78.90 
S2.70 


6 . 95 
9 20 


3. — 4 ft. in. seam 


5 90 







8 Ed. 7 Cassiar District. L 81 



The anthracitic quality of this coal may be explained by its contiguity to two areas of 
later eruptive rocks, one at the head of Glacier creek and the other on the north side of Gold- 
stream, and to the great heat and pressure consequent on their intrusion. 

On Goldstream, a little below its junction with Coal creek, and separated from the above 
area by a short distance only, a new coal area was discovered this year. This area, about two 
by two miles and one-half, at its greatest diameters, is in the form of a basin, the coal out- 
cropping on both sides of, and from 400 to 500 feet above the floor of, the valley. The coal 
dips towards the creek from both sides with a slope rather greater than that of the hills, so 
that it underlies the bed of the stream, although at no great depth. 

Up Goldstream this area is separated from that on Coal creek — probably by an anticline, 
the coal measures having been removed from its axis by denudation. At the lower end the 
limits of the coal-bearing strata are not so clearly defined, but, in all probability, the creek has 
there cut through the coal measures to the underlying volcanics, this cutting being accentuated 
by another anticlinal fold. 

The coal has been opened up at only one place, where two seams have been uncovered, 
the upper one showing 5i feet of clean coal overlain by about 1| feet of soft impure coaly 
material, the cut not having been extended far enough to locate the roof clearly. The lower 
seam shows 3 h feet of clean bright coal. No analyses have as yet been made of these coals, 
but in appearance they closely resemble the coal from Coal creek, analyses of which have been 
given above. At several other points across the basin the coal outcrop was noted, but no 
time was available to open up the seams. 

No evidences of local disturbances or faulting of any great extent were noted. 

Another and smaller area was seen about two miles farther down Goldstream, but has 
not been opened up. 

Other areas of the coal-bearing rocks were noted at Driftwood creek, Moricetown, at the 
head of the Zymoetz river, and on Hudson Bay mountain, but at none of these localities has 
any workable seam been yet found, and it seems probable that the seams reach their maximum 
thickness in the Telkwa-Morice River district, and thin out rapidly, at least towards the 
north. 

It is now fairly certain that no great coal field exists in the Bulkley Valley district from 
Hazelton to the headwaters of the Morice, but many comparatively small, isolated areas are 
known in which the coal varies from a lignitic to a semi-anthracite. In some of these areas 
the strata are greatly disturbed, much faulting and folding being in evidence. 

The quality of the coal seems to depend on the proximity of the measures to the newer 
eruptive rocks, which are younger than the coal, and in places have sent out dikes cutting the 
seams. 

A number of fossils were collected from the coal measures and adjacent beds ; although 
none of these have as yet been determined, there is sufficient evidence to state that these rocks 
are probably lower cretaceous, though possibly Jurassic. 



L 82 Report of the Minister of- Mines. 1908 



PEACE RIVER-YUKON TRAIL. 
Notes by the Provincial Mineralogist. 

For the last two years the R. N. W. Mounted Police have been engaged in making a trail 
from Fort St. John, on the Peace river, across British Columbia, via Fort Grahame and Fort 
Connelly, to the Yukon Telegraph line, which is then to be followed, with certain local 
variations, to Telegraph Creek, Atlin and White Horse in the Yukon. As the cutting out of 
this trail renders a section of the northern part of the Province more available to prospectors 
and others, the following particulars of the trail are given, taken from the Report of Commis- 
sioner Perry, of R. N. W. Mounted Police, for 1907, and from other sources. 

From Edmonton a good waggon road leads to Athabaska Landing — a distance of 
approximately 100 miles— over which a stage runs twice a week, also numerous freight teams. 
There are excellent stopping houses on the road and a good hotel at the Landing. The 
Hudson Bay Company and Revillion Freres have large stores at the Landing, where ordinary 
supplies can be obtained, 

From Athabaska Landing travel in winter is by sleigh road up the river on the ice to the 
mouth of Lesser Slave river, which is then followed up to the lake of the same name, to the 
Lesser Slave Lake post of the Hudson Bay Company. 

In summer there is a steamer running on the Athabaska, from the Landing up to Lesser 
Slave river, from which point to Lesser Slave Lake post travel is up the river and lake by 
canoe or York boat, or, after leaving the steamer, horses can be taken over a trail following 
the north bank of the river and lake to the Post. The distance from the Landing to Lesser 
Slave Lake post is about 200 miles. At the Post there are a couple of good stores, etc., run 
by the Hudson Bay Co. and Revillion Freres. There is considerable settlement in this vicinity 
and a large half-breed colony, so that horses and packing outfit can usually be obtained here. 

From the Post to Peace River Crossing is a distance of about 100 miles over a rather 
poor waggon road. At the Crossing there are two stores, and a North- West Mounted Police 
Barracks. The Peace river is crossed by a ferry, and the road continues along the north side 
of the river to Dunvegan and on to Fort St. John, a distance of 180 miles. 

Dunvegan is the best point to leave the waggon road, for the Pouce Coupe country in 
British Columbia, as a few miles south of the river, opposite Dunvegan, there is the half-breed 
settlement of Spirit river, where horses can be obtained, and from where to the Pouce Coupe 
prairie there is a good trail and possible waggon road. 

Fort St. John is the first place met with in British Columbia in coming from Edmonton, 
and here is located a Deputy Mining Recorder's office, where free miner's licences may be 
obtained and claims recorded. The police trail really only begins at Fort St. John, as the 
road to this point has been built for some years. 

Leaving Fort St. John, the trail leads westward up the north side of the Peace river for 
22 miles to the mouth of Cache creek, which it follows up to the north-west for 22 miles, 
when it crosses the north branch of the Halfway river. It then follows up the main Halfway 
river, now on the bench, now in the valley, to the junction of the Cypress river, 97 miles from 
Fort St. John. Here it turns westward, following up the valley, and enters the first range of 
mountains^(Rocky mountains) at the 114-mile post, and, by an easy grade, crosses the range 
through Laurier pass. It now drops rapidly, crosses Ottertail creek above the forks and, 
mounting a low ridge, dives into a small valley, entering immediately the gorge of a small 
stream flowing from the west ; this it follows up, crossing and re-crossing the bed of the 



8 Ed. 7 



Cassiar District. 



L 83 



stream. Leaving this stream on the right, it climbs upwards for 1,000 feet to the summit of 
the second range, known as the Devil's canyon, 15-i miles from St. John. 

It soon drops again, by a steep descent, into the valley of a westward flowing stream, the 
bed and banks of which it follows down, with a mile or more of rough going, when the trail 
improves, until the crossing of the Ospika river — at 172-mile post — is reached, when it com- 
mences a long, steady climb to the summit of the third range — Herchmer pass — 180 miles 
from St. John. From Fort Grahame it is 20 miles to the month of the Ingenika river, on 
which recent finds of placer gold are reported. At Fort Grahame the Hudson Bay Company 
has a post at which ordinary camp supplies can usually be had, but it is better to learn from 
the Company's head office in Victoria as to the stock on hand this season, before counting on 
supplies at Fort Grahame. 

From Fort Grahame, the distance to Bear lake (Fort Connelly), is 116 miles in a general 
south-westerly direction. In that distance the trail crosses three mountain ranges, the first and 
second by easy grades and at no great elevation, but the third range is crossed at an altitude 
of 7,000 feet, by barometer, some 2,000 feet above the valley of the Omineca, the climb being 
made in six miles. Fort Connelly has been abandoned as a trading post and no supplies are 
to be obtained there. 

From Fort Connelly to the line of the Yukon Telegraph trail is 53 miles, in a westerly 
direction, the trail meeting the Telegraph line four miles north of the "Fourth Cabin," which 
is 100 miles from Hazelton. This stretch of trail is said to be very good. Hazelton is the 
head of steamboat navigation on the Skeena river. It is the seat of the Gold Commissioner 
and Mining Recorder of the District, and has three or four stores where supplies of all sorts 
can be obtained ; three hotels, post office, telegraph office, hospital, itc. Steamboat navigation 
opens on Skeena river about 1st of May and closes about end of October — both dates depending 
somewhat upon the season and state of water in the river. 

Distances by R. N. W. M. Police Trail between Edmonton and Hazelton. 



Explanation - . 

To find the distance between 
any two points : — Read, 
from starting point in ver- 
tical list of names, across 
to column headed by place 
of destination and find 
distance there. 



Edmonton 

Athabaska Landing 

Lesser Slave Lake 

Peace River Crossing 

Dunvegan 

]-Y'it St. John 

Cypress River 

Lander Pass 

Devils' Canyon 

Ospika River 

Herchmer Pass 

Fort Grahame 

Fort Connelly 

Junction with Telegraph Line 
Hazelton 





100 
300 
400 
470 
580 
667 
694 
734 
752 
760 
788 
904 
957 
1061 



[00 

o 

■2* HI 
300 
370 
480 
577 
594 
634 
652 
660 
688 
S04 
857 
961 





it 




















6 


o 


= 






















~~- 


X 










• 




-f. 






j 


h-1 

-_ 


O 




a 


> 


M 







71 

- 


S) 


>. 


— p 


- 


o w 










c 






« 


V 


s - 


c3 


> 


c 


t 


P2 


- 
.2 


cS 




- 




- 




CZ3 


- 
o 


to 

- 
> 


v. 


CO 

01 

- 


U 


- 


- 

6 


ea 
— 


a 
c 
a 


_ be 


m 


^ 




u 






> 


" 










o 


- 




z 


>. 


cS 




f. 




z 






h-1 


— 


- 


— 


U 


i-l 


- 


z 


w 


— 


'- 


1-5 


300 


400 


470 


580 


677 


094 


734 


752 


760 


788 


904 


('57 


200 


31 H i 


370 


480 


577 


594 


634 


652 


660 


688 


804 


857 





100 


170 


280 


377 


394 


434 


452 


460 


488 


604 


657 


100 





70 


180 


•_'77 


2'. 14 


334 


352 


360 


388 


504 


557 


170 


70 





111) 


207 


224 


264 


282 


290 


318 


434 


4S7 


280 


180 


lln 





97 


114 


154 


172 


180 


208 


324 


377 


:;:: 


277 


2()7 


97 





17 


57 


75 


83 


111 


227 


2S0 


394 


294 


224 


114 


17 





40 


58 


66 


94 


210 


263 


134 


334 


264 


154 


57 


40 





18 


26 


54 


170 


223 


452 


352 


282 


172 


75 


58 


18 





8 


36 


252 


305 


460 


360 


290 


IMI 


83 


66 


26 


8 





28 


144 


197 


4SS 


388 


318 


208 


111 


94 


54 


36 


28 





116 


169 


604 


504 


434 


324 


227 


210 


170 


152 


144 


116 





53 


657 


oo/ 


487 


377 


2 so 


263 


223 


305 


197 


169 


53 


n 


761 


661 


591 


481 


384 


367 


327 


409 


301 


273 


157 


104 



= 



1061 
961 
761 
661 
591 
481 
384 
367 
327 
409 
301 
273 
157 
104 




L 84 



Report of the Minister of Mixes. 



1908 



SOUTH-EAST KOOTENAY DISTRICT. 



FORT STEELE MINING DIVISION. 
Report of J. F. Armstrong, Gold Commissioner. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit a report on the progress of mining in the Fort Steele 
Mining Division for the year 1907. 

The following table shows approximately the number of mineral claims held during each 
year since 1899 : — 




Mineral Claims. 

The assessment work done on mineral claims again shows a large decrease and the number 
of new locations is smaller than in the previous year. 

The shipping mines have been the St. Eugene group at Movie, and the Sullivan and Xorth 
Star groups at Kimberley. 

The Cambrian is a property lying under Moyie lake ; it is now held under Crown grant. 
A double compartment shaft is being sunk through the alluvial deposit on the bed of Moyie 
like a couple of hundred feet from the east bank ; it has now reached a depth of 90 feet from 
the surface of the water. The management expect to reach bedrock by sinking 10 feet farther. 
Three shifts a day are now at work and an air compressor, two pumps and drilling machinery 
have been installed. 

The Aurora group, on the west side of Moyie lake, is being developed by local capital. 
Good progress is being made, but, so for, no ore has been shipped. 

The Victor group, on Maus creek, near Fort Steele, has been developed to a considerable 
extent. The management is gratified with the result and await increased facilities of trans- 
port as the present railways are too far away for shipping. 

The North Star has only shipped 3,000 tons of ore. Much development has been done. 

The Sullivan group has been shipping and smelting ore all the year. The results w T ill be 
shown in the report of the Provincial Mineralogist. The ore is now of such a nature that no 
additional flux is required. 

The St. Eugene has been at work during the whole year. As no reports are made to me, 
I would refer to the annual Report of the Provincial Mineralogist. 



8 Ed. 7 South-East Kootenay District. L 85 



Note by Provincial Mineralogist. 

The St. Eugene mine, at Moyie, on Movie lake, is owned and operated 
St. Eugene. by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of Canada, and has been in 
continuous operation during the year. About 125,000 tons of ore were 
mined and concentrated in the company's concentrator, producing about 22,600 tons of lead 
concentrates, the ratio of concentration being about 5.5 tons of ore to 1 of concentrates. 
These concentrates, containing about 007,000 ounces of silver and 27,000,000 pounds of lead, 
were smelted, for the greater part, at the Trail smelter, owned by the same company. 

A full description of the mine and concentrator will be found in the Report of this Bureau 
for 1904. This mine is the largest producer of lead in the Province, producing about 56 % of 
total output. 

The Sullivan group of mines, owned by the Sullivan Group Mining 
Sullivan. Co., is located near Kimberley, on Mark creek, and was in operation 

almost continuously until within the last three months of the year, when 
the drop in the prices of lead and silver, combined with the financial depression, caused a shut- 
down and the property did not start up again during the year. A very large tonnage of ore 
was developed in the mine, but it is a very low grade, in lead and silver, and contains a high 
percentage of zinc blende. The nature of the ore is such that no attempt has been made at 
concentration by water, and the ore is smelted direct at the company's smelter, erected at 
Marysville, on Mark creek, at its junction with the St. Mary's river, which place is connected 
by a branch with the main Canadian Pacific Railway at Cranbrook. The company mined 
and smelted in 1907 about 28,000 tons of ore, carrying about 179,000 ounces of silver and 
9,200,000 pounds of lead. 

A description of this property was also given in the Report of 1904. 

The North Star mine, also situated at Kimberley, is interesting as 
North Star Mine, having been the first large producer in the district. The known ore-body — 
an immense lens of very pure galena — was seemingly exhausted several 
years ago, and repeated attempts by various engineers failed to locate any extension of the 
then known ore-body. The property was turned over to the charge of the then accountant, 
Mr. Curran, to clean up the little ore left in the old stopes, but he has somehow managed to 
find ore and has continued shipments of about 3,000 tons in 1906 and about the same amount 
in 1907. 

These three properties produced in 1907, 821,367 ounces of silver and 37,526,194 pounds 
of lead — nearly 79 % of the total lead production of the Province. 



Placer Claims. 

The usual output by Chinamen hydraulicing and sluicing on Wild Horse creek has been 
maintained. 

One company has been working on Perry creek. It is said that the property has been 
purchased by the Illinois Steel Co. 

The Company operating on Bull river has been working on their diversion and power 
ditch but have not yet completed it. 

A mining lease was located on Moyie river, but no work has been done on it. 

Coal Claims. 

The only shipping collieries are those of the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., at Coal Creek and 
Michel. As no returns are made to this office, I must refer to the Provincial Mineralogist. 



L 86 Report of the Minister of Mixes. 1908 



Development work has been carried on at the Carbonado collieries of the same company 
and shipments from that point will probably be resumed in 1908. 

The Hosmer colliery, an enterprise in the interests of the Canadian Pacific Railway, has 
been developed on a large scale. Machinery is being installed, coke ovens are being built, and 
shipping on a large scale will soon be commenced. 

On Elk river, between Morrissey and Fernie, the Western Coal and Oil Company hold 
eight claims, but no development is apparent. 

The other coal propositions in the district are in situations not reached by railway, and 
the mines cannot be operated until such means of transport is provided. 

The Corbin Group, on the south fork of Michel creek, in Block 4,593, consists of 17 
claims held under lease and four under licence. Development work has been continuous and 
it is expected that a railway will be built in 1908. 

On the other groups of coal and oil claims in Block 4,593 very little work has been done, 
pending litigation being given as an excuse, but applications have been made for 46 new 
licences, and 15 applications for renewals have been reported through this office. 

The Imperial Coal and Coke Company hold S3 claims under lease and six under licences. 
Coal has been developed at many points, but railway transport has not yet been secured. 

The Northern Coal and Coke Company hold 44 licences and leases along both banks of 
the upper 20 miles of Elk river. They have proved the existence of coal in large quantities 
and are awaiting railway construction. 

A syndicate is holding 45 claims on the eastern bank of Elk river, between the Northern 
Company's land and Lot 4,588, and is also awaiting the advent of a railway. 

A group of 24 claims has been applied for on the west bank of Elk river, opposite the 

last two groups. 

Office Statistics — Fort Steele Mining Division. 

Mineral claims recorded 115 

Placer claims recorded and re-recorded 4 

Partnership placer claims 

Certificates of work 160 

Certificates of improvements issued 19 

Conveyances or other documents of title 4 s 

Partnership agreements .... 3 

Gold Commissioner's permits 9 

Documents filed 20 

Affidavits filed 237 

Records of water grants and permits 4 

Mining leases issued 3 

Mining leases in force "- < 

Free miners' certificates (ordinary) 365 

ii ii (company) 4 

m .1 (special) = 

Crown Grants issued 19 

Records of abandonment 5 

Revenue. 

Free miners' certificates . , ^2, 039 25 

Mining receipts 2,912 50 



8 Ed. 7 South-East Kootexay District. L 87 

FISSURE IX ROCKS ABOVE COAL CREEK MINES, FERNIE. 

Victoria, 26th November, 1907. 
The Honourable the Minister oj Mines, 
Victoria, B. C. 

Re Reported Danger from Rock Slides at Coal Creek. 

Sir, — In accordance with instructions received from you, I left Victoria on November 1st 
and proceeded to Fernie, to investigate the condition of the mountain above the workings of 
the coal seams of the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company at Coal Creek, which had been reported 
to you as being in a condition, owing to the extraction of the underlying coal, to cause danger 
to life and property. 

I arrived in Fernie on night of 3rd, and on the 4th I interviewed your informant, Mr. 
Biggs, the secretary of the local Union, and learned from him that the anticipated danger lay 
in the fact that the extraction of the coal in No. 1 and No. 9 mines, Coal Creek, had caused a 
subsidence of the hill above these seams, which subsidence was manifested by the opening of 
cracks in the higher rocky beds of which the mountain is formed, and it was feared by many 
of the inhabitants of Coal Creek that these fissures — some of which were in rocky cliffs — would 
cause large fragments of the cliff to become detached and that these would roll down upon*the 
houses in the valley, causing a disaster similar to that which occurred some years back at 
Frank, Alberta. 

As far as Mr. Biggs knew, or I could hear from others, there was no insinuation or 
expectation of danger in the mines mentioned, and the supposed danger was entirely from the 
surface material which it was thought might roll down upon the houses. 

On the 5th inst., I went up to Coal Creek and examined the whole of the ground in 
question. As your information had been from the secretary of the local Union, I considered 
it advisable that the secretary and two other members should accompany me, which they did 
at my request. I was also accompanied by Mr. McEvoy, the geologist and engineer of the 
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, and by Mr. Morgan, the Inspector of Mines for the District. 

I find that the mountain in question is on the north side of Coal Creek — its highest point 
being almost due north of the tipple — from which the hill rises with a very uniform slope of 
about 35° to a height of some 1,800 feet above the railway tracks, with two or three sandstone 
or conglomerate bluffs from 30 to 60 feet high, standing nearly vertical, making the average 
angle from the top to both of about 36° to 37°. There are two coal seams underlying this hill 
that have been worked, viz. : No. 1 mine and No. 9 mine. 

No. 1 mine is the the overlying seam and has been extensively mined, but has recently 
been abandoned on account of the pavement rising up gradually and filling the levels, etc., 
causing heavy expense in timbering and in " brushing out " the levels and air-courses. While 
this argues a subsidence of the overlying strata, it also argues that the greater part of such 
subsidence has already taken place and that no sudden caving is to be expected. 

No. 9 seam underlies No. 1 and is from six to eight feet thick of coal. These workings I 
inspected on the 6th inst. This mine has been operated exclusively on the "long-wall" 
system, whereby all the coal in the seam is extracted as the working face is advanced ; the 
space left by the coal is partially filled with timber, refuse, rock, etc., and as the workings 
advance the roof gradually settles down, crushing and compressing the filling, until the roof 
and pavement are practically in contact and as secure from further settlement as before the 
coal was extracted. 



L 88 Report of the Minister of- Mines. 1908 



The travelling and haulage roads and the airways through the worked-out portions of the 
mine, where the roof and pavement have come together, have been kept open by taking down 
the roof or taking up the pavement and are now practically rock tunnels. In this system of 
mining there are no old workings left in which any accumulation of gas can occur. 

From these facts I argue that no further subsidence of any importance will occur in the 
surface overlaying the seams so far worked, and as the workings at present extend to a point 
under the brow of the hill — back of which the surface is more nearly level — any further cracks 
due to subsidence will be in the flatter country and free from all suspicion of danger. 

As to any danger from the subsidence which has already taken place, I would say there 
is none, for the reason that the strata forming the mountain are hard, solid beds of sandstone, 
conglomerate and argillite, quite unaffected by water. These strata are merely horizontal — 
such dip as they have being into the hill — which eliminates any possibility of there being any 
general slide of the hillside into the valley of Coal Creek. 

The fissure, which was the immediate cause of the investigation, occurs in a sandstone 
bluff some 75 feet high, which forms the brow of the hill, some 1,800 feet above the level of 
the railway tracks, and cuts across a point of this bluff in a direction parallel with the main 
creek. The fissure in the solid rock is about 18 inches wide, but where the rock is covered 
with earth, the earth has in places run down, giving the impression, to a casual observer, of a 
fissfcre of several feet in width. 

This fissure evidently occurred in the early part of the past summer. In addition to this 
most recent fissure, I found several other parallel fissures occurring at intervals down the 
hillside, which fact indicates that the subsidence of the hill has been gradual and going on for 
some time. This number of small fissures is much less dangerous than if the effect was 
concentrated in one large break. 

The most recent fissure had detached a section of the bluff some 75 feet high, which 
toppling over, had fallen down on the steepest part of the general hillside, and the fragments 
of this rock fall had rolled or been thrown down the hillside for some distance, the piece going 
farthest — a mass of some eighty tons — being not over 100 yards from the base of the bluff. 
This gives a practical illustration that the slope of the hill is not sufficiently steep to permit of 
boulders rolling any distance. From this bluff to the nearest buildings is a horizontal distance 
of about 2,500 feet. 

As to the underground workings — I could not enter No. 1 mine, as it had been abandoned 
for some time and is now nearly choked up, but I know it from previous inspections. 

I went through No. 9 mine with the overman, the Inspector and Mr. Biggs, and found 
everything in good order and as safe as coal mining can be made. 

I include with this report a section of the hill in question, showing location of fissures, 
etc. 

In conclusion, I beg to report that, in my opinion, these fissures do not offer or suggest 
any danger from slides or rolling rocks from the hillside, and that no further investigation is 
required. 

I might say that I found some 150 men had been frightened from their work by stories 
of the extent of these fissures ; consequently, I considered it advisable to give a statement of 
my findings to the local press at once and before making my report to you, of which action I 

informed you by telegraph. 

I am, etc., 

Wm. F. Robertsox, 

Provincial Mineralogist. 



8 Ed. 7 North-East Kootenay District. L 89 



NORTH-EAST KOOTENAY DISTRICT. 



GOLDEN MINING DIVISION. 
Report of J. E. Griffiths, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit my annual mining report for the district of North-East 
Kootenay for the year 1907. 

Conditions have improved a little, a larger number of men being kept steadily at work 
developing, and the prospects of shipments during the ensuing year are good. 

This property, -which is situated about three miles east of Field, has 

Monarch Mine, been leased by the Canadian Concentrating and Smelting Co., which has 

built commodious buildings for the employees and staff and is preparing to 

instal a wire cable tramway, but, in the meantime, a waggon road has been built to the C. P. 

R. track. Seven carloads of ore have been shipped to Toronto and two to Trail, but the 

returns are, however, not available. 

Situated on Ice river, about 15 miles from Leanchoil. The Labourers 
Shining Beauty. Co-operative Co. is still working on this claim, both tunnels being in about 
500 feet each, driven on a well-defined lead of quartz impregnated with 
galena. No ore has yet been shipped. 

On the property of the Golden Giant Mines, Limited, located on 
Giant Mine. Spillimachene mountain, seven miles west from Spillimachene, on the Colum- 
bia river, -41 miles south of Golden, and consisting of three claims and a 
fraction, all about 600 feet above the river and at an altitude of 3,000 feet, a large amount of 
development work has been done, opening up a very large body of galena, said to assay about 
25 % lead and from 5 to 10 oz. of silver. Complete and substantial buildings have been 
erected on the property and a concentration plant of the Elmore vacuum process has been 
erected, with all the necessary equipment for a capacity of 40 tons a day. So far the tests 
have proved very satisfactory, and by the 1st of May the plant should be turning out its full 

capacity. 

Office Statistics — Golden Division. 

Free miners' certificates 109 

Company certificates 3 

Mineral claims recorded 95 

Placer claims recorded 1 

Mining leases recorded 6 

Certificates of work . ... 73 

Notices to group 6 

Powers of attorney 3 

Conveyances 19 

Certificates of improvement 1 

Crown-granted mineral claims in the district 98 

Revenue. 

Free miners' certificates 725 00 

Mining receipts 1,673 30 

Royalty 18 60 

Acreage tax ' 590 45 

83,007 35 



L 90 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



WINDERMERE MINING DIVISION. 
Report of E. J. Scovil, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit herewith a brief report on the Windermere Mining Division 
for 1907. 

Little change has taken place since 1906. The following properties made shipments 
during the fall : Tecumseh, Paymaster, Comstock, Charlemont and Black Diamond. 

Development work has been carried on more or less upon most of the leading properties 
(silver-lead) ; otherwise nothing more than the usual assessment work has been done. 

During the season several promising copper properties were located, viz. : Copper King 
group, on Jumbo fork of Toby creek ; Copper and Copper No. 3, on Skookum creek, a tribu- 
tary of No. 3 creek, and the Steelhead group, on Salmon river (creek). 

This Division has an immense stretch of really virgin prospecting ground, which w T ith the 
advent of the Kootenay Central Railway will receive due attention from the prospector. As 
a matter of fact, serious mining is in abeyance until the completion of the Kootenay Central 
Railway, when the many promising properties — added to those, which are now in a position 
to ship — will demonstrate what can be produced from this particular section of the Province. 

Office Statistics — Windermere Mining Division. 

Pree miners' certificates , 86 

Locations 36 

Assessments 103 

Conveyances, etc 21 

Water records 62 

Certificates of improvements , 1 

Revenue $2,670 70 



8 Ed. 7 North-West Kootexay District. L 91 



NORTH-WEST KOOTENAY DISTRICT. 



Report by Robert Gordon, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on the progress of mining within 
the Revelstoke, Lardeau and Trout Lake Mining Divisions, for the year ending December 
31st, 1907. 

The year has shown no very marked development either in quartz or placer mining, owing 
principally to lack of capital with which to prosecute work and also to lack of transportation 
facilities throughout the different portions of the district. In the Revelstoke Division 
hydraulicing has continued on Smith, McCulloch and French creeks in the Big Bend, and the 
results, particularly on McCulloch creek, have been very encouraging. A considerable amount 
of money was spent on these claims during the .past year, there being about 50 men employed 
during the summer months. 

The quartz claims in the Big Bend District have been entirely at a standstill excepting 
for assessment work necessary. 

In the Lardeau Division the Eva has been producing steadily and the stamp-mill kept 
going almost throughout the entire year. 

The Silver Dollar mine has also done a good deal of development work, and although shut 
down just now, owing to financial stringency, is expected to re-commence operations in the 
early spring. 

The owners of the Lucky Jack mineral claim (Lardeau Division) are installing a small 
stamp-mill on their property this winter, and will be in a position to test its value during the 
coming year. 

In the Trout Lake District the Silver Cup and the Broadview have made very good 
showings, and with increased shipping facilities that locality will become a good revenue 
producer. 

The outlook for the whole district is, on the whole, very encouraging and with the advent 
of capital, and good management, will undoubtedly come to the front in a very few years. 



REVELSTOKE DIVISION. 

Report of W. C. McLauchlix, Mixing Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit my annual report of mining operations in the Revelstoke 
Mining Division for the year ending December 31st, 1907. 

During the past } r ear but little development work has been done on the quartz mines in 
this Division, except the necessary annual assessment work. More work than usual was done 
on the placer claims of Smith creek, French creek and McCulloch creek ; all are expected to 
make a good showing in the spring. I am indebted to J. D. Sibbald, manager of the Revel- 
stoke and McCulloch Creek Hydraulic Mining Co., Ltd., for the following : — 

"During the year 1907 the company has met some drawbacks from slides and old works 
of 1865 and 1866. In the spring the work started on what appeared to be an end of the old 
works, but after washing 15 feet up stream ran into a large amount of old workings, where 



L 92 Report of the Minister "of Mines. 1908 



the old-timers had cleaned up the bedrock from a shaft by running both up and down the 

channel. Following on this an immense slide came down the creek, bringing many thousand 

cubic yards of mud and timber, filling in our flumes and shutting off our water supply at the 

pressure box and carrying one monitor down some distance. This involved two months' work 

to get in running order again. As the winter was coming on and water was low, we decided 

to run a drift up stream during the winter, which is now going on with good results, as the 

channel at present is producing sufficient gold, with a very hopeful future for the coming 

spring, should we not again run into the old workings of past years. Owing to the slides of 

over 40 years closing up all appearance of old workings, this is only known by driving into 

them. However, as we are now through the canyon, we believe we are through the old 

workings." 

Office Statistics. — Revelstoke Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates issued 191 

Companies' n n ^7 

Locations recorded 53 

Certificates of work recorded 48 

Certificates of improvement 5 

Bills of sale recorded (mineral) 10 

Money paid in lieu of work 2 



TROUT LAKE MINING DIVISION. 
Report of F. C. Campbell, Mining Recorder. 
I have the honour to submit herewith my report of the progress of the mining industry 
in the Trout Lake Division for the year 1906 : — 

There has been no marked change in mining conditions in this Division during the year. 
The season's operations, apart from the annual assessment work, have virtually been confined 
to the Silver Cup and the Broadview mines. The Silver Cup, which has been a steady 
producer, has increased its shipments about 200 tons over the amount shipped last year, as 
well as very materially increased its reserve of second grade ore, which will be available for 
milling at some future date. As the ore shipped from this property is of an exceptionally 
high grade, the increase in values produced is, therefore, quite considerable. This mine has 
also, during the year, opened up ore-bodies at a depth of 1,050 feet below the original outcrop, 
which, I am informed, are more extensive than in the workings above and carry good values. 
The Silver Cup, situated on the. south fork of Lardeau creek, has 
Silver Cup. been worked continuously during the year, employing an average of 51 
men. One thousand six hundred and eighty-four feet of development work 
has been done, consisting of 1,233 feet of drifts and cross-cuts and 451 feet of raises and 
winzes. Eight hundred and eighty-five tons of clean ore has been shipped, and the ore on the 
second grade dump, which will be available for milling purposes at some future date, has been 
considerably increased. A winze has been sunk to a depth of 143 feet below the level of the 
lower adit and 540 feet of drifts opened up on the 100-foot level from this winze. A 1,000 
cubic foot capacity water power compressor has been installed at Nine Miles, on the south 
fork of Lardeau creek, which is connected with the mine by 9,000 feet of air-pipe. This will 
do away with the old steam compressor and materially reduce the cost of operation. 

On the Broadview, situated on Great Northern mountain, development 

Broadview. work has been proceeded with continuously during the year, an average of 

16 men being employed. The 300-foot level has been extended on the course 

of the vein for a distance of 600 feet; 8 cross-cuts have been driven to the hanging-wall at inter- 



8 Ed. 7 North- West Kootexay District. L 93 



vals of about 75 feet, and an exploratory cross-cut driven into the foot-wall for a distance of 55 
feet from the drift ; the total amount of cross-cutting on this level being 195 feet. An upraise 
of 154 feet has been made, connecting this level with the No. 2 level. The result of this 
development is said to be exceedingly satisfactory-, having opened up large bodies of good 
milling ore, as well as considerable clean shipping ore. Four hundred and fifty feet north and 
147 feet vertically below the mouth of No. 3 tunnel a new cross-cut has been started; this is 
being driven Gh by ~\ feet in the clear and is intended as the main working tunnel of the 
property. It is expected to cut the lead at a depth of, approximately, 620 feet on the dip of 
the vein below its outcrop. This tunnel has been driven 160 feet and is calculated to cut the 
lead within the next 35 feet. I am informed by the manager, Mr. Newton W. Emmens, that 
arrangements are being made to instal an air-compressor, tramway and concentrating plant 
during the coming year. 

The True Fissure Mining and Milling Co., Ltd., has aquired, during the year, the St. Elmo, 
Blue Bell, True Fissure and four other adjoining claims, situated on Great Northern mountain, 
and have erected suitable buildings on the property, with the view of starting mining operations 
in the early spring. 

Considerable work of a prospecting nature was done on the /. X. L., situated near the 
head of Brown creek. 

Tunnels, drifts and cross-cuts, aggregating about 300 feet, were made on the Calumet and 
Hecla, a property situated on Rapid creek and carrying good gold values, with, I am informed, 
satisfactory results. 

On the Morning group, also on Rapid creek, about 100 feet of tunnel was driven, which 
opened up a very fair ore-body. 

During the latter part of the year work was resumed on the Handy, situated near Gerrard, 

a contract being let to sink a double-compartment shaft. This work is now being proceeded 

with. 

Office Statistics— Trout Lake Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates issued to individuals 172 

n n ii companies 7 

ii M ii individuals (special) 1 

Mineral claims recorded 80 

Certificates of work issued 297 

Cash paid in lieu of assessment work 1 

Certificates of improvement recorded 43 

Bills of sale, agreements, etc., recorded 51 

Abandonment of mineral claims recorded 2 

Grouping notices filed - 67 



LARDEAU MIXING DIVISION. 
Report of B. E. Drew, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit herewith a short report of the progress made by the Lardeau 
Mining Division during the year 1907 : — - 

There has been little activity in mining in this division during the year, evidently due to 
the failure of two or three companies operating around Camborne to make expenses, and now 
inactive, due partly to mismanagement and lack of the necessary capital. 



L 9-t Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



The Eva Gold Mines, Limited, has been enabled to run continuously since the stamp- 
mill started over four years ago. 

The Berniere is lying idle and awaiting a purchaser. This property being above timber 
line, it has been easy to strip the lead, exposing a very well-denned, although small, body of 
quartz, in which free gold can be seen distinctly. 

With the exception of the Eva and the Oyster Criterion properties, the companies oper- 
ating the other mines are for the most part controlled by American capital, directed from the 
other side ; it is, therefore, impossible to state whether or no the operations for the year have 
been successful. The necessary assessment work on the various claims has been kept up, but 
locations have fallen off as has also the number of free miners' certificates issued. 

Office Statistics. — Lardeau Mining Division. 

Locations recorded , 31 

Certificates of work issued 132 

Bills of sale recorded 11 

Free miners' certificates 81 

n M special 3 

Certificates of improvement 5 



8 Ed. 7 Slogan District. L 95 



SLOCAN DISTRICT. 



AINS WORTH, SLOCAN AND SLOCAN CITY MINING DIVISIONS. 
Report of E. E. Chipman, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit my report for the Slocan District for the year 1907. 

The improvement in the mining industry in the Slocan District, hoped for in the beginning 
of 1907, has not been realised, in consequence of the decrease in values of metals and unsettled 
financial conditions. Progress has, however, been made, and a larger number of mines are 
working than at the close of 1906, and there has been a material increase in the tonnage of 
ore marketed. The great majority of the mines are being worked under the " leasing system," 
and, despite the unfavourable prices obtained for the ores, the operators have been fairly well 
remunerated for their labour, and undiminished confidence for the coming year prevails. 



AINSWORTH MINING DIVISION. 

In this division the greatest activity was in the Ainsworth camp. Many of the older 
mines, which had been unworked for a number of years, resumed operations, notably the Let 
Her go Gallagher, which, after a shutdown of 18 years, proved the surprise of the year by 
again entering the list of shippers with a rich oxide ore. At 60 feet in depth it is now in 
good ore, with every indication for profitable work. 

The New Jerusalem, another of the oldest locations in British Columbia, under lease, 
made its first shipment of ore, about 60 tons, which fairly remunerated the holders, and 
demonstrated the value of several typical, low-grade galena claims in that vicinity, when 
metal values are at all stationary and at a fair price. 

The Krao, which was purchased late in the year 1906 by Montana parties, was the centre 
of interest. Fifty thousand dollars was expended on the mine during the year in under- 
ground work and surface equipment. The underground work consisted of sinking a two- 
compartment shaft, 4 feet by 4 feet 6 inches, timbered by 8 by 8-inch timbers, 156 feet below 
old developed ground and in repairing the old shaft, making a total depth of 256 feet, with 
500 feet of drifting, tunnelling and cross-cutting. Boarding and bunk-houses were built to 
accommodate a large force of men. There were also erected engine and ore-houses, a barn and 
blacksmith shop. The machinery consists of one 80 h.p. boiler, horizontal type ; one 25 h.p. 
boiler, locomotive type ; one double cylinder hoist, with cars, trucks and tools necessary 
for the economical and effective working of the plant. An average of 20 men was employed 
during the year. The unexpected tapping of water-courses in sinking made development in 
that direction very difficult arid expensive and a consolidation with adjoining claims and an 
extensive tunnel is contemplated. 

Development work was performed on a number of claims ; notably the Highlander long 
tunnel was driven an additional 200 feet ; and the Tariff" company completed some 800 feet 
of underground work on the line of general development. 

Among the claims which were profitably worked under lease can be mentioned the 
Maestro, which shipped 200 tons; the No. 1, 40 tons ; the Fergus, 10 tons; the Libby, 15 
tons ; the Spokane-Trinket, 400 tons, and the Black Diamond and Little Donald, 25 tons. 



L 9G Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



The Canadian Metal Company continued its development of the 
Blue Bell Mine, property up to the end of June, at which time this work was suspended on 
account of the large volume of ore opened, and lack of storage space for ore 
which would be broken down in further development. Construction work on the company's 
concentrating plant was begun about the 1st of March, and at the close of the year the plant 
was nearly completed. The lead mill is expected to have a capacity of 200 tons of ore 
per 24 hours, and a zinc separation department has been provided, which will be completed 
probably in March of 1908. The very considerable amount of pyrrhotite present in the zinc 
makes magnetic separation the only feasible means of producing a marketable zinc product, 
and for this purpose it is intended to experiment extensively with the International Separator, 
a magnetic separating machine of the high tension type. The plant is provided with a well- 
equipped machine shop, which has already greatly facilitated construction. All machinery is 
driven b} 7 water-power and the buildings are all heated by steam. The water-power is derived 
from a pipe-line about three miles in length, affording a static head at the plant of about 700 
feet, and using, when in full operation, about 475 horse-power. 

The absence of any suitable accommodation for men, made it necessary to prepare in 
rather an extensive way, and following out a plan, which is undoubtedly a very wise one, the 
company has gone to large expense in providing, probably, the best equipped quarters in the 
interior for its employees. Besides the general quarters, several cottages have been built, and 
are in great demand by the employees. In the spring probably more cottages will be provided. 

Woodbury Creek. 

Two men worked on the Baltimore part of the year in developing the mine, and shipped 
10 tons of high grade silver ore. 

The Pontine is being worked under lease ; four men are employed, but no further 
information has been obtained. 

The Jessie-Blue Bird worked on. an average four men during the year, drove 400 feet of 
tunnel, and shipped 65 tons of very high grade silver ore, netting the owner $17,335. 

The King Solomon Mining Company worked seven men on assessment work for about 

two months. 

Hamill Creek. 

The Argenta Mines Company worked a force of 9 men for the first four months of the 
year in development. The mine closed down in May. 

Duncan River. 

The Bed Elephant group, on Hall creek, drove 60 feet of tunnel on the lead • have a body 
of copper-gold ore 21 feet in width, assaying from 88 to 828 in gold and 2 % to 5 % in 
copper. Three car-loads of ore on the dump, but for lack of transportation facilities no ore 
was shipped. 

Considerable development was done on the Wagner group, the Old Gold and the Guinea 
Gold properties. The figures for the work done have not been supplied, and for the reason as 
given above no ore has been shipped. 

On Cooper creek, the Copper Cliff group, a force of five men were worked by James 

Cronin, of Rossland, in development work, for about five months and satisfactory results to 

the owner were obtained. 

Kaslo Creek. 

At Bear lake considerable work in development was done on the Empress and Silver 
Glance, and one car load of ore was shipped from the latter during the season. 




<€& 



.+ '.•,. V 




1- '■■ '. - 






s 




8 Ed. 7 Slogan District. L 97 



Whitewater. 

Messrs. Retallack and S. S. Fowler continued operations as lessees of the Whitewater and 
Whitewater Deep mines, with satisfactory results. Operations, however, were more or less 
adversely affected by the necessity of curtailing shipments for a time, on account of the 
smelter situation in the earlier part of the year, and again during June and July. Early in 
the spring a large amount of work was done on the Whitewater mill, in order to prepare it for 
the making of a zinc concentrate, zinc hitherto having been discarded from this plant. Since 
May the mill has done good work in the saving of both lead and zinc. 

In January of last year was begun the driving of Xo. 8 level, Whife>rafer, which, at the 
close of the year, was in on the vein about 800 feet. This development has opened a consid- 
erable reserve of ore, sufficient, probablv, to last for about two years. Practically no develop- 
ment work was done in the old workings, but Xo. 7 has been extended through the Whitewater 
Deep, and is now again in Whitewater ground. The relation of the property lines to the 
direction of the vein makes it highly important for both owners that such operations as the 
lessees are able to conduct be continued. Without them, or without the amalgamation of the 
properties, there would be much difficulty in the operation of the lower portion of the vein. 

During the year, the shipments of lead ore and concentrate from the two properties 
amounted to about 2,600 tons. Besides the above, approximately 3,000 tons of zinc concen- 
trates were produced, which have been accumulated at Whitewater, because of unsatisfactory 
zinc market conditions, brought about by uncertainty as to U. S. tariff regulations. Arrange- 
ments have been made, however, by which this material will be moved in the spring. 

The average number of men employed was about forty. 

South Fork of Kaslo Creek. 

The Province worked 12 men five months, principally on the surface, erecting a tramway, 
building ore-bunks, and making preparation for extended work for the ensuing year. Shipped 
40 tons of concentrates. Arrangements have been made for the more convenient working of 
the mine by using the lower tunnel of the Cork and availing themselves of the advantage of 
the concentrator of the last-named mine in the treatment of the ores, which are largely of a 
concentrating character. 

The Cork has been shut down during the year, but will be opened about the first of May 
next, with an increased force, in conjunction with the operation of the Province. 

The Montezuma worked continuously during the year, with an average force of 26 men. 
Shipped 290 tons of concentrate, completed tramway and put the mill in condition for the 
separation of the zinc ore from the lead. The zinc product still remains at the mine, but will 
be shipped as soon as the settlement oi! the tariff on the ore to the United States is finally 
adjusted. 

The Revenue worked three men five months in development. Drove 150 feet of tunnel 
and shipped 15 tons of silver-lead ore. 

The Flint mine worked an average force of three men for the year, and accomplished 450 
feet of work, cross-cutting and drifting on the ledge. The owners have expended on this 
mine, in the last two years, 814,000, and have opened up a rich body of silver-lead ore which 
will more than repay them for all their outlay. Forty-five tons of ore were shipped during 
the year. 

The Index worked two men for nine months, in development; made a raise of 125 feet ; 
built one-half mile of waggon road and erected blacksmith shop and ore-sheds and has a 
car-load of very rich silver-lead ore ready for shipment. 



L 98 Report of the Minister of. Mines.' 1808 



The owners of the Nome group worked two men continuously for six months in driving 
cross-cut tunnel, and were rewarded late in the season by cutting the ledge and uncovering 
a large body of high grade ore. 

Office Statistics. — Ainsworth Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates, personal 264 

ii ii special 2 

H n companies 4 

New claims recorded 120 

Transfers recorded 61 

Certificates of work issued 484 

Payments in lieu of work 3 

Water records issued 46 

Pre-emptions issued 18 

Certificates of improvement — land 22 ; mines 54 76 

Certificates of purchase 225 



SLOCAN MINING DIVISION. 
Report by Angus McInnes, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit herewith my annual mining report and office statistics for 
the Slocan Mining Division for the year ending December 31st, 1907 : — 

With reference to the mining conditions during the year, I may say that, for the first 
nine months, with silver averaging about 68 cents an ounce, and lead up as high as £20 a ton, 
everything appeared very satisfactory, but the drop in the price of silver, for the last three 
months to 53 cents, and also the drop in lead, has had a tendency to depress mining in this 
district again, for, under present conditions, it is a foregone conclusion that some of them will 
be compelled to close down till batter prices obtain. In two instances mines had undertaken 
heavy development work to tap the leads at 750 and 800 feet vertical depth, and a number of 
properties which have been idle for some years have been taken under lease and bond and 
have opened up some fine ore-bodies, and, if prices come up to a reasonably fair place, there is 
no doubt that the Slocan will be very prosperous. 

In the first part of the year this property was worked by H. Lowe 

Batchelor. and partners, who shipped considerable ore, but later they turned over the 

mine, or made arrangements with the owner, Mr. Petty, to do so, to an 

American company at a price, on a bond, stated to be $180,000; but, however, the property 

reverted back to Mr. Petty, who, since, July, has shipped some five cars of high grade ore 

from the mine, and it is still being steadily worked. 

The Canadian group has been worked all summer by the Rrandon Bros., of Silver ton, 
who have also shipped some good grade galena ore, probably about between two and three cars. 

Only one car of ore has been shipped from this well-known mine this 

Eureka- year, but the company has been steadily developing its ore-body for the 

Richmond. whole season, and, as the new tram was not completed, and by which there 

would be a big saving in sending down the ore, no large shipments were 

made. I am informed by the manager that he has opened up a splendid body of zinc ore as 

well, and has about completed a tram 5,000 feet long, and an ore pocket of 75 tons capacity. 

About 25 men have been employed about the mine since June. 



8 Ed. 7 Slogan District. L 99 



Under lease to George Gormley and partners, who have opened up a 
Elkhorn. fine ore-body. They have shipped 43 tons of silver-lead ore and have 

opened up a body of zinc ore from three to four feet in a chute over 100 feet 
long. They have worked four men steadily. 

This company has shipped some 31 cars of dry ore during the year, of 
Hewitt. the net value of approximately $43,781, working about 30 men. A new 

tram, some 5,000 feet long, with a capacity of 10 tons per hour, connecting 
with the Wakefield mill, has been built. Bin capacity at lower end, 775 tons ; upper endj 
500 tons. Two levels have been driven right through the hill. This company has also a long 
lease on the Wakefield mine and mill and proposes to do some extensive mining in the near 
future. There is a two years' supply of ore for the mill in sight in the Hewitt mine now. 

Worked by Bennett and Clark. These men undertook to drive a long 
McAllister. tunnel to tap the vein at depth, but they were not able to complete the 
work this season. In view of this development they did not ship much 
ore, only some seven tons of high grade dry ore being sent out. 

This mine was bonded by Mr. R. Black. He has been working an 
Molly Hughes, average of four miners steadily, and has shipped 48 tons of high grade dry 
ore since August. Development, 200 feet of tunnelling ; ore in sight, three 
to four cars. 

Under the management of C. A. Bigney. The development work on 
Majestic. this property for the season has been ; tunnelling, 125 feet; raise, 200 feet . 

stoped 25 feet square; ore shipped, 28 tons of galena, netting $1,750 
Two miners have been employed. 

This is a new property, situate near Cody, and has been bought out- 
Maggie, right by a Mr. Duck, of Milwaukee. He is now employing 15 men, and 
expects to have some 25 before long. He has erected fine bunk-houses 
cook-house, etc., and has his first car of clean galena ore ready for shipment, with several 
more in sight. 

It is hardly a report without some few words about this mine 

Payne. During this summer this well-known mine went " under the hammer," for 

somewhere about $50,000, to Eastern parties, and it is expected that before 

long some new work will be commenced. I believe that some ore has been shipped, but have 

not yet been able to find out what amount. 

The Beco, a well-known old mine, was opened up again this year by Mr. Harris, about 
July, and since that time it has shipped to date about 200 tons of rich galena ore, and has 
employed 20 men a month. 

At present this mine is being worked by G. Ransome, late of the 
Slocan Sovereign. Payne. A very large body of milling ore has been opened up. There have 
been four men employed steadily, and 125 tons of galena ore have been 
shipped. Work consists of 300 feet of tunnelling and 200 feet of raise driven. 

This property, under the management of Mr. G. Aylard, of New 

Standard. Denver, is making a good mine. He is employing steadily about 20 men, 

and development for the year consists of 1,000 feet of tunnelling, 500 feet 

of stoping, and 200 feet raising. He has expended over $50,000 this year and shipped ore 

to the value of over $60,000. He is driving a long tunnel to get under the ore, and should 

he catch it there, he will undoubtedly have one of the best mines in the district. 



L 100 Report of the Minister of Mixes. 1908 



Is being worked by Mr. A. Smith, of Kaslo. About 800 feet of tunnel 

Surprise. has been run on this property, driving the Last Chance No. 3 tunnel through 

the Noble 5 with a view to cutting 750 feet vertical depth under the old 

Surprise workings. Six men were continually employed doing this work. No ore was 

shipped. 

Mr. J. A. Whittier has been in charge of operations at this mine, 

Goodenough. driving a long tunnel to tap the vein at 450 feet below the old workings. 

This tunnel will be about 1,500 feet long when completed. So far 450 

feet of it has been driven and occasional pockets of galena fouud, whilst a large body of zinc 

ore has been encountered. It will be late next year before this long tunnel is finished. This 

same company has a lease and bond on the Bluebird, and is taking out some good galena ore. 

Owing to the continued litigation, nothing much was done on the Slocan Star property ; 
some development, but no ore shipped. 

This mine is doing remarkably well at present and is turning out 10 

Vancouver. tons of silver-lead concentrates, and 10 tons of zinc concentrates every 24 

hours. Some 12,000 tons of ore have been milled, which has made 1,050 

tons of zinc concentrates, 850 tons of silver-lead concentrates and 70 tons of hand-sorted 

galena. Development consists of 1,270 feet of drifting, cross-cutting, etc. An average force 

of 50 men has been employed, but at present the company has 70 men on the pay roll. 

Nothing much is being done on the Washington mine, as the company is waiting for a 
more favourable market for zinc, having large bodies of that ore blocked out. Some 25 tons 
of galena has been shipped this year. 

Dr. Gomm is still pounding away on the Ya-Ya and has driven about 350 feet of a drift 
and expects to get his ore-body at any time. 

The Wakefield, Buffalo, Mountain Con., Ruth, Wonderful, American Boy, Sunset, Cali- 
fornia, Alamo-Idaho, Queen Bess, Corinth and Sunshine have nearly all shipped some ore and 
done some development work, but I am unable to state just the amounts. 
Office Statistics for the year 1907. 

Free Miners' Certificates issued 209 

Claims located ' ' 

Assessments recorded 188 

Agreements and transfers 35 

Traders' licences issued 37 

Revenue tax receipts issued 208 

Marriage licences ° 

Certificates of Improvements 13 

Ore output, over 3,000 tons, with 1,000 tons of zinc just being sacked for shipment. 

Average number of mines working for the year, 14 per month. 

Average number of men employed per month, 175. 



8 Ed. 7 Slogan District. L 101 



SLOCAN CITY MINING DIVISION. 
Report of H. R. Jorand, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit, my report for the Slocan Cit} 7 Mining Division for the year 
ending December 31st, 1907. 

The ore shipments for this Division again show a slight decrease from those of the previous 
year, which is due to various causes. 

Springer Creek. 

This mine has been a steady shipper during the year, shipping some 

Arlington. 920 tons. During the fall of this year the management decided to instal a 

diamond drill at the property with a view to prospecting its ore bodies at 

depth. The drill is to be run by electricity generated by water power. The water power and 

the electric plant are already installed, and the drill will be at work before the end of Januarv. 

Some 14 men are now employed at the mine and this force is to be gradually increased as new 

ore-bodies are discovered. 

The Ottawa mine was closed during part of the year, which accounts 

Ottawa. for the small shipments of ore to its credit, only 170 tons having been sent 

to the smelters. Word has just been received from the owners instructing 

the local manager, Mr. Foley, to begin work again. Only a small force will be employed at 

the beginning. 

The Myrtle and the Tamarack were both worked in a small way during part of the year, 
the former shipping 10 tons of ore and the latter 20 tons. 
The Graphic is now being worked under lease. 

Ten-Mile Creek. 
This property has been worked during the whole vear with most 
Westmont Group, encouraging results. Twenty tons of high-grade ore were shipped during 
September and another carload is now ready. The seven claims comprising 
the group have lately been acquired by the "Westmont Silver Mining Company, Limited, a 
company incorporated in Ontario for the purpose. Active work will be continued during the 
coming year and the force at the mine increased. 

In the beginning of December Messrs. Jacobson and Hendricson 

Neepawa. secured a lease of this property. After a raise of ten feet on the vein a 

body of high-grade ore, about two feet in thickness, was encountered; about 

ten tons of this is now sacked and ready to ship. Only four men are now employed, owing to 

the difficulty of getting in supplies at this time of the year. 

Twelve-Mile Creek. 

The only property worked on this creek during the last year is the Midnight, from which 
a shipment of ten tons of ore was made in the spring. 

Lemon Creek. 
No work has been done on this creek during the year other than of the usual assessments. 
Office Statistics — Slocan City Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates issued, ordinary 121 

n ii company 7 

Certificates of work recorded 205 

New locations recorded •. 72 

Conveyances recorded 26 

Certificates of improvements recorded 15 

Cash paid in lieu of work .... 6500 



L 102 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



NELSON DISTRICT. 



NELSON MINING DIVISION. 

Report of Harry Wright, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit my annual report on the Nelson Mining Division for the 
year ending the 31st of December, 1907. 

During the first part of the year there was great activity in all branches of mining 
throughout the district, but the financial stringency occuring during the latter half caused 
considerable curtailment of development. In the case of those mines the principal output of 
which consists of copper, the phenomenal fall in the price of that metal also caused a cessation 
of production. In nearly all cases, however, where these deterrent circumstances were 
inoperative, there has been good progress made, and the results of the year's development have 
been such as to inspire increased confidence in the mineral resources of the district, and to 
presage a considerable renewal of activity as soon as these unfavourable conditions, which may 
be regarded as of a purely temporary nature, have been improved. 

Sheep Creek. 

As in the previous year, the scene of the greatest activity in mining was the Sheep Creek 
district. The joint output from the Queen, Kootenay Belle, Mother Lode, Nugget and Emerald 
makes a very considerable total from the Sheep Creek bek, while in the immediate vicinity, 
the Arlington, Second Belief and Keystone mines have all been producers on a considerable 
scale. 

These properties, near Yrnir, were bonded in February last to a syndi- 

Yankee Girl and cate of American capitalists, who operated the properties for six months 

Yukon. and, during that time, drove over 1,000 feet, in development of the ore 

bodies, besides erecting an serial tramway from the Yukon to a spot on the 

Dundee waggon road near Ymir. In August, however, the condition of the money market on 

the other side forced these American capitalists to relinquish their bond on the properties. 

The owners have since shipped a few carloads of ore, running from $20 to $25 a ton. 

The Ymir Gold Mines, Ltd., the English company operating the Ymir 
Ymir. mine, was reconstructed in the early part of the year, and the sum of 

$200,000 provided for additional development of the mine. A crew, 
averaging about 40 men, has been at work during nine months of the year, efforts being 
principally directed to locating the vein which is indicated by rich float as existing above tha 
old Ymir vein. Some development was also done in the deep levels of the mine, without 
resulting, however, in the finding of any considerable body of pay ore. Small bodies were 
found and about 1,000 tons, averaging $5, was put through the mill. 

This group is still under bond to Mr. James Cronin and his associates. 
Queen Victoria. Development has been carried on throughout the year, with an average 
force of 25 men. Although some 250 feet of tunnelling and raising has 
been done in the course of development, the nature of the immense outcrop lends itself to 
economical mining by the " glory hole " system, and most of the mining has been done in this 
manner. Some 3,500 tons of ore have been shipped to the Trail smelter during the year, the 
average assay being 2.6 per cent, copper, 1 ounce silver, and a little gold to the ton. As the 



8 Ed. 7 Nelsox District. L 103 

principal values are in the copper contents, the output has been curtailed since the decline in 
the price of that metal. The development during the year has sufficed to show the existence 
of an immense body of low grade copper ore, while the natural facilities presented by the 
property for the economical mining and handling of the ore ensure a very low cost of opera- 
tion. An a?rial tramway has been constructed from the mine to connect with the railway 
spur at the bottom of the hill. 

The decline in the price of copper also caused considerable impediment 

Eureka. to development on the Eureka mine, the output of which consists almost 

entirely of that metal. Some development was done, however, and 620 

tons of ore shipped, the average assay being 5.5 per cent, copper, 2.0 ounces gold, and 2.40 

ounces silver per ton. 

The Poor man-Granite properties have been worked conjointly, under a lease, by Mr. 
Thomas Gough, who has had a very successful year. During the year 6,000 tons of ore were 
treated in the ten-stamp mill on the Granite, producing a gross amount of approximately 
$50,000. At the Referendum mine, on 49 creek, development has been pushed to the 200-foot 
level and a small mill has been operated during the latter part of the year, the total crushed 
being 250 tons, producing $2,100. 

Mr. William Waldie, the owner of the Queen, has operated this mine 
Queen. continuously throughout the year, with very satisfactory results, both as to 

production and development. The ten-stamp mill has run almost continu- 
ously during the year, and has crushed 8,845 tons, producing by amalgamation over $70,000, 
and over 830,000 in concentrates. The average number of men employed was 28, and in 
addition to the work done in mining ore, new development work was done to the extent of 
300 feet in drifting and cross-cutting, and 150 feet in sinking and raising. During the year 
Mr. W'aldie also acquired the Yellowstone group adjoining the Queen, a propert} 7 formerly 
owned by the Yellowstone Mines Co., Limited., and successfully operated by them for many 
years. Although no development was done on this newly acquired group during the past 
year, it is the intention of the present owner to re-open the mine this spring. In view of the 
large bodies of ore developed on the Queen and the anticipated production from the Yellowstone, 
Mr. TValdie has doubled the capacity of his stamp-mill and will shortly be operating 20 stamps 
instead of 10, as heretofore. 

The output from the Kootenai) Belie and Mother Lode mines, near the Queen, has been 
treated by a small customs mill erected on Sheep creek by A. H. Tuttle, of Ymir. 

From the Keystone mine, now under lease to Frank Finney, 71 tons of high grade ore 
were shipped to the Trail smelter, and netted the lessee nearly $85 per ton. 

The Nugget mine, in the same neighbourhood, shipped 21 tons, producing over $110 a 
ton, while the Emerald shipped 560 tons of lead ore, producing approximately $10,000. The 
Second Relief mine was in operation for a portion of the year only, and its ten-stamp mill 
crushed about 3,000 tons of ore, producing approximately, $25,000. 

This property continued, as in former years, to make considerable 
Arlington Mine, shipments of crude ore. The vein is a blanket vein varying in width from 
(Erie.) a few inches to four or five feet of heavily mineralised matter. In develop- 

ment it is necessary to mine a large quantity of waste matter, which is 
used in filling up the stopes, but the work is so well laid out, and the facilities for handling 
the ore so well arranged, that the cost of production is probably reduced to the lowest possible 
minimum. During the year, of the total mined, 1,250 tons were shipped, averaging about 



L 104 Report of the Minister op Mines. 1908 



637 per ton in gold and silver, besides an average assay value of 2.95 per cent, lead and 5.7 per 
cent. zinc. In new development work, 1,421 feet were driven, and the average number of 
men employed was 30. 

A considerable production has been made during the year from the 
La Plata Mining Molly Gibson mine, on Ivokanee creek, owned by the La Plata Mining Co., 
Co. Limited. The 100-ton concentrator was in operation during nearly the 

whole of the year, although its full capacity was not utilised. Altogether, 
a total of, approximately, 20,000 tons of ore, carrying silver and lead, was mined and passed 
through the concentrator, being brought to the mill from the mine by means of an aerial tram- 
way. The product hauled from the mill and shipped to the smelter amounted to 3,600 tons of 
concentrates, and realised a gross value of, approximately, $120,000. The number of men 
employed during the year averaged 61. 

In September last the Hall Mines Smelter was closed down, in conse- 

Hall Mining &. quence of the necessity for a re-adjustment of the company's finances. During 

Smelting Co. the early part of the year the smelter was in receipt of a considerable tonnage 

from the surrounding mines, but financial conditions during the last six 

months, by their effect on the mining companies, considerably reduced the operations of the 

smelter. The total receipts for the year from 49 mines are as follows : — 

784 tons from Emma Mine (in Boundary District) ; 

908 ti it Silver King Mine ; 
1,576 ii ii B. C. Standard Mine: 
7,706 it dry and lead ores. 

Total 10,974 „ 

The No. 1 furnace was in blast 14 days only, and has now been taken down. No. 2 was in 
operation a total of 200 days, and the total tonnage smelted was 14,117 tons, of which 833 
tons was fluxing ore from the Emma mine, 3,493 tons lead and dry ores and B. C. Standard 
ore, and 9,791 roasted and converted product. The result of these smelting operations was the 
production of 3,953 tons of lead bullion, containing 593,068 ounces of silver and 4,502 ounces 
of gold, with an aggregate value of $717,808.02. 

The Silver King mine was operated during the year by the company, the Davys lease 
having expired in the previous year. The total product was 2,279 tons, containing 28,330 
ounces of silver and 159,613 lbs. of copper. The average assay per ton of ore shipped was 12.44 
ounces of silver and 3.5 per cent, copper. 

The Hunter V. mine, at Ymir, was operated during the greater part of the year by the 
Hall Mining and Smelting Co., on lease from the B. C. Standard Mining Co. The total 
shipments were 3,961 tons, which were distributed among the Northport, Trail and Nelson 
smelters. The high per centage of lime in the Hunter V. ores makes it a desirable flux, the 
average per cent, of lime in the year's output being 43, with 19 per cent, of silica. The con- 
tents of the ore shipped during the year total 23,350 ounces of silver and 68.36 ounces of gold. 
On the cessation of work by the Hall Mining and Smelting Co. in September, the lease held 
by that company was relinquished and the property has been shut down since that date. 

Office Statistics — Nelson Mixing Division. 

Mineral claims located 244 

Certificate of work recorded 408 

Money in lieu of work 4 

Transfers recorded 100 

Certificates of improvement 20 



8 Ed. 7 Nelson District. L 105 



Free miners' certificates, individual 650 

ii ii company 15 

ii special 2 

ii H company special 1 

Revenue. 

Mining receipts $3,152 30 

Free miners' certificates 4,517 25 



ARROW LAKE MIXING DIVISION. 
Report of Walter Scott, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit my annual report on the Arrow Lake Mining Division for 
the year ending December 31st, 1907. 

On the Millie Mack, situated on Caribou creek, 16 miles east of Burton, Mr. H. E. 
Foster has kept a force of men working all year, and there are 200 tons of ore sacked up ready 
for shipment, as soon as the snow will permit, for rawhiding. 

On the Big Ledge, situated at Pingston creek, comprising 25 claims, no development has 
been done this season, just the ordinary assessment work. This claim shows a large deposit 
of zinc ore, averaging 30 % zinc. 

Office Statistics — Arrow Lake Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates 26 

Special free miners' certificates 1 

Certificates of work . , 22 

Conveyances, etc 10 



L 106 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



ROSSLAND DISTRICT. 



TRAIL CREEK MINING DIVISION. 
Report of J. Kirkup, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit my report of mining operations in the Trail Creek Mining 
Division during the year 1907 : — 

Mining in this division during the past year was confined principally to the three large 
companies which are successfully operating on Red Mountain, viz.: — the Consolidated Mining 
and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited ; the Le Roi Mining Company, Limited, and the 
Le Roi No. 2, Limited ; the Consolidated White Bear Mining Company, Limited, having 
closed down in the latter part of the month of October, and the Giant-California Mining 
Company not having commenced operations until the early part of the month of July. 

In addition to the foregoing, some three or four small properties were worked under lease 
during the latter part of the year. 

The shipments of ore are somewhat in excess of those of the previous year, the output 
being, approximately, 289,056 dry tons, of an approximate gross value of $3,040,937, the 
reduction in value being attributed, largely, to the fall in the price of copper. 

The average number of men employed during the year was 780, which number will 
undoubtedly be largely increased during the coming year, the prospects for a much larger 
output being very favourable. 

These properties, which are adjoining, are owned and are being 
Centre Star, War operated continuously by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company, 
Eagle, Idaho and of Canada, Limited, the shipments during the year consisting of 135,662 
Iron Mask. tons of ore, which was treated at the company's smelter at Trail. The main 

shaft, which is on the Centre Star mine, has attained a depth of 1,975 feet from the collar, and 
it is the intention of the management to shortly commence the sinking of this shaft to a 
further depth of 350 feet. Mining was carried on during the year in the 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 
8th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th and 14th levels in the Centre Star, the 4th, 5th, 6th, 11th and 
12th levels in the War Eagle, the 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th, 11th and 12th levels in the Idaho, which 
correspond with the same levels in the Centre Star ; the 400-foot and 600-foot levels in the 
Iron Mask, the 400-foot level in this property connecting with the 6th level in the War Eagle, 
all of which levels are run from the main shaft. Development work during the year consisted 
of sinking a shaft on the Idaho to a depth of 300 feet, thereby connecting with the 4th level ; 
sinking main shaft on the Centre Star 187 feet, making such shaft a total depth of 1,975 
feet; tunnelling, 11,111 feet; raising, 693 feet; winzing, 141.5 feet, and diamond drilling, 
8,616.7 feet; the total underground workings of these properties being approximately 17 
miles. The average number of men employed during the year was 370, and the addition to 
the plant during the year is valued at $134,000. 

These properties are owned and operated by the Le Roi Mining Com- 
Le Roi, Black pany, Limited, the shipments of ore during the year being 110,410 tons, 

Bear. taken from the different levels down to the 1,350 feet, about 20,000 tons 

of which was treated at the Trail smelter and the balance at the company's 

smelter at Northport, in the State of Washington. Development work during the year con- 



8 Ed. 7 Rossland District. L 107 



sisted of sinking the main shaft a distance of 216.5 feet (such shaft now having attained a 
depth of 1,650 feet) ; driving, 2,567 feet; raising, 375.5 feet; cross-cutting, 1,636.5 feet, and 
diamond drilling, 3,7-10.5 feet. 

In addition to the foregoing, the following work was done on properties under option by 
this Company: — Spitzee mineral claim, drifting, 610 feet; cross-cutting, 78.5 feet: diamond 
drilling, 1,864 feet; Townsite mineral claim, drifting 408.5 feet; cross-cutting, 28.5 feet; 
winzing, 19 feet, and diamond drilling, 113.5 feet; the average number of men employed 
during the year being 245. 

These properties are adjoining, and are owned and operated by the 
Josie, Annie, Annie LeRoi No. 2, Limited, and from them, during the year, 22,198 tons of 
Fr., Poorman, No. 1. ore were shipped, in addition to which 12,963 tons of ore were treated at 
the company's mill on the ground. 

The main shaft, which is 900 feet deep, is situate on the Josie mine, and from it levels 
are run at the following depths : 100, 300, 500, 700, and 900 feet, the 400 and 600-foot levels 
being connected with the others through winzes ; there are also three surface tunnels, two of 
which are on the Josie and one on the Poorman. Development work during the year con- 
sisted of driving, 3,010 feet; raising, 276 feet; diamond drilling, 5,608 feet; the average 
number of men employed during the year being 110. 

This property is owned by the Consolidated "White Bear Mining Corn- 
White Bear. pany, Ltd., and was operated during the year until about the 20th October, 
when, on account of the low price of copper, it was considered advisable 
to close down. Shipments during that time consisted of 2,641 tons of ore and 310.67 tons 
of concentrates, representing, approximately, 5,000 tons of low grade ore ; the average number 
of men employed being 25. 

These properties have recently been acquired by the Giant-California 
Giant-California. Mining Company, and operations were started on the properties early in 
July, 1907, since which date about 25 men have been steadily employed 
on development work. The tunnel in the California has been extended 1,000 feet, and a shaft 
in such tunnel has been sunk over 200 feet. On the Giant some 500 feet of work has been 
done, consisting of tunnelling and upraising. It is the intention of this company to sink the 
shaft in the California to a depth of about 550 feet and then drive in an easterly direction 
and connect with the 6th level of the Le Roi, No. 2, whose workings are now up to the east 
line of the California, where a good class of ore is being taken out, and which lead undoubt- 
edly extends into the ground of this company. 

This property, situate in what is known as the south belt, was worked 
Nest Egg. for a short time in the latter part of the year, under lease, by some working 
miners, during which time 47 tons of ore were shipped, the value of which 
did not justify the carrying on of such work by hand; consequently, work was stopped. 

This property, also situated in the south belt, was worked under lease 

Olla Podrida. by some working miners during a short time in the fall of the year, 37 tons 

of ore being shipped, the value of which was exceptionally good, but, on 

account of the smallness of the vein and the necessary amount of development work required, 

it was found impossible to make wages, and they were therefore compelled to surrender their 

lease. 

This property, lying immediately north of the City of Rossland, is 

Evening Star. being worked under lease by some working miners, the shipment of ore to 

the end of the vear consisting of 96 tons, the value of which was fairly good 



L 108 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



These properties, owned by the Inland Empire Mining and Milling 

Inland Empire. Company, Limited, are situated on Grenville mountain, in the extreme 

Saginaw Fr. western portion of this district, about 4.5 miles from the Columbia and 

Berlin. "Western Railway and connected therewith by a good waggon road running 

within a short distance from the workings on the property. Development 

work during the year consisted of 40 feet of cross-cutting and straightening the shaft, which 

is now 170 feet in depth, situate on the Inland Empire claim; sinking a shaft 40 feet deep 

on the Berlin claim, with very satisfactory results, the ledge having widened from 5.5 feet on 

the surface to 9 feet at the bottom of the shaft, carrying good values, together with several 

open cuts on the surface. 

In addition to the foregoing, the following improvements were made on the surface : 
Constructing a saw-mill, 24 feet by 50 feet, with a capacity of 10,000 feet per day, for the 
purpose of cutting lumber and timber for the development of the mine ; three dwelling-houses 
and barn ; shaft and engine-house, 35 by S5 feet, together with the installation of a 70 h.p. 
boiler and 30 h.p. hoisting engine, at a total cost of §15,000, thereby enabling the company to 
carry on development work on a fairly large scale. 

In addition to the foregoing, very little work was done, other than the necessary assess- 
ment work, which is very small compared with that of a few years ago, although very much 
the same as last year, as shown by the accompanying office statistics. 

Office Statistics. — Trail Creek Mixing Division. 



Mineral claims recorded 32 

Certificates of work 61 

Certificates of improvement 2 

Bills of sale, etc., recorded 10 

Free miners' certificates, companies' 5 

n ii personal 157 

ii n special 2 



8 Ed. 7 



Boundary District. 



L 109 



BOUNDARY DISTRICT. 



GREENWOOD MINING DIVISION. 
Report of W. G. McMtnn, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit my annual report on mining operations in the Greenwood 
Mining Division during the year 1907. 

The result of the year's output of ore for the district is not up to expectations, as 
operations were handicapped by the strikes of the coal miners, which curtailed the supply of 
coal and coke, the severity of the weather during last winter, which to some extent disorganised 
the railwav service, and the labour conditions. 

For purposes of comparison, the following table gives the production of ore, in tons, in 
the Boundary District for the last eight years : — 

1900 (6 months only) 96,000 tons. 

1901 = 390,800 ., 

1902 508,876 .. 

1903 690,419 „ 

1901 829,808 ,. 

1905 933,518 „ 

1906 1,161,537 .. 

1907 1,148,237 „ 



Total 



5,759,225 



Ore shipment returns from the several producing mines of the Boundary District for 
1907, as'far as they can be ascertained and the figures secured, were as follows, in dry tons : — 

Granby Con. M. S. & P. Co.'s mines, near Phoenix 613,537 tons. 

Consolidated M. & S. Co. of Canada, .. 135,001 

B. C. Copper Co.'s mines, near Deadwood (Mother Lode) 208,321 

.i it Summit Camp (Emma) 18,274 

,, ii M (Oro Denoro) 14,481 

(B. C. mine) 1,712 

Dominion Copper Co.'s mines, near Phoenix (Brooklyn-Idaho) . . 55,548 

n ti ii (Rawhide) 64,173 

ii n Deadwood (Sunset) 31,258 



n n Summit (Mountain Rose 

Morrison, Deadwood Camp 

Riverside, Rock Creek 

Sally, Beaverdell, West Fork Kettle River. 
Duncan, n n 

Providence, near Greenwood 

Elkhorn, m 

Strathmore, n 

Skylark, m , 

Bay, ii . . .» 

Golden Eagle, North Fork Kettle River . . . 



3,999 

649 

90 

65 

40 

700 

20 

55 

224 

30 

60 



Total. 1,148,237 .. 

At the Granby mines, owned by the Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting and Power 
Company, Limited, Phoenix, the most important camp in the Greenwood Mining Division, the 



L 110 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



company usually employs about 500 men in the vicinity. The ore is broken down in the 
immense stopes, run into chutes, thence in mine cars to the crushers and ore-bins, and thence 
by rail to the smelter at Grand Forks, about 30 miles distant — never being handled by hand 
or shovel from the time it is blasted until it comes out in the shape of marketable blister copper 
at the smelter, gravity being used as far as possible, in all operations for handling. 

Nothing but stoping is going on at the No. 1 level of the Granby mines, where formerly 
two steam shovels were at work, it being more economical to break and drop the ore in chutes 
to the lower levels. The No. 2 tunnel or level is still used for a big output of ore, the 10-ton 
steel dumps being operated by a steam locomotive for feeding one of the giant rock breakers, 
which, in turn, drops the ore to the No. 3 level. 

On the No. 3 level, electricity is the motive power, two 75 h.p. motors handling the long 
string of ore dumps. The terminal for this level is on the Great Northern railway tracks and 
is spendidly equipped for handling a large tonnage — 3,000 tons per day, if necessary — includ- 
ing ore crusher, elevating machinery and ample ore bin capacity, with the usual economical 
rail — railway dump — car-loading facilities common to low grade mines. 

During the past year what is known as the Victoria shaft outlet has been put in commis- 
sion, costing upwards of $100,000, with its 250 h.p. electric hoist, three-compartment shaft, 
ore crusher, conveyor, ore bins, etc. A feature of this outlet is that the railway cars of both 
the C. P. It. and the Great Northern can be loaded from the ore bins, thus making it useful 
for both railways. This outlet can also handle 3,000 tons of ore daily, if desired, both rail- 
ways having ample trackage facilities. The Great Northern spur to the Victoria shaft 
headworks is estimated to have cost the railway company about $100,000. The Victoria shaft 
is finished and equipped to a depth of 400 feet ; the skips, when loaded, weigh about seven 
tons each, running in counter balance. At the 400-foot level, electricity is being substituted 
for horse-power, a lot of specially constructed 7-ton steel ore dumps for use at that level having 
recently arrived at Phoenix from Pittsburg. The electric equipment is being installed and in 
a short time will be in running order. A 60-drill electrically driven air compressor furnishes 
the power needed for drilling, pumping, hoisting and many other uses at the properties, 
including diamond drilling and machine shop purposes. 

Granby's ore shipments for the past year have been as follows (in dry tons) : — 

January 34,192 tons July 80,216 tons 

February 32,465 n August 54,077 n 

March 63,826 m September 74,667 n 

April 70,518 n October 86,711 n 

May 5,072 „ November 39,003 ,. 

June 72,820 n December (shut down) 



Total, 613,567 tons. 

At the Dominion Copper Company's mines, owned by the company of 
r p that name, near Phoenix, and adjoining the Granby Company's properties, 

above mentioned, extensive development work has been carried on during 
the year, especially at the Idaho and Rawhide, while the Brooklyn mine of the company has 
been shipping steadily. The Brooklyn-Idaho group is in the heart of the City of Phoenix, 
while the Rawhide is about half a mile distant, adjoining the Snoivshoe and Gold Drop mines, 
in the Grand Forks Mining Division. Altogether, the Brooklyn mine has sent out close on to 
300,000 tons of ore since shipments started first. The ore is all hoisted through a 350-foot 
shaft from this mine and sent out over the C. P. R. The Stemwinder, adjoining the Brooklyn, 
is also well equipped with machinery, but has not been operated much this year, the energies 
having been concentrated on the company's other properties. 



8 Ed. 7 Boundary District. L 111 



The Idaho mine has been extensively opened up by tunnels and " glory hole " work, 
making the blasting down of ore an easy and economical matter. This mine is served 
by a spur from the Great Northern Ry., which connects with the C. P. R. about eight miles 
distant, at Summit Camp. 

A 30-drill compressor supplies all the power required for the several mines. The Idaho 
mine has also a shaft and a good electric equipment for use at the lower levels, when needed, 
this mine being connected with the Brooklyn mine by a drift at the 250-foot level, under the 
City of Phcenix. When operating at normal capacity, the Dominion Copper Company employs 
in Phcenix camp alone from 200 to 300 men, and ships from 750 to 1,000 tons daily by 
rail to its own smelter at Boundary Falls, about 20 miles distant. 

Deadwood Camp. 

The second most important camp in the Greenwood Mining Division 
B. C. Copper Co. is Deadwood, located about three miles west of Greenwood, and the leading 
property is the Mother Lode mine, owned and extensively operated by the 
British Columbia Copper Company, Ltd. This mine is the chief producer of the company, 
supplying the bulk of the tonnage for their smelting works at Greenwood, which are excellently 
equipped with the most modern machinery. Recently, electricity was substituted for steam, 
and the 35-drill air compressor is being augmented by another of the same size, which is now 
en route to the mine. Another ore crusher, with jaws opening -12" x 36", of 64 tons capacity, 
being the same size as the large crushers used at the Granby Co.'s mines, is also being installed 
at the Mother Lode, and a 35-drill Rand compressor and 600-h.p. motor and rope drive for the 
same. A new compressor house addition, seven cottages for married employees and a superin- 
tendent's house, were also erected. A 500-h.p. motor and rope drive, a 100-h.p. motor for the 
crusher, a 100-h.p. hoist, and a 15-h.p. motor for the machine shop installed earlier in the 
year. During 1907 the Mother Lode shipped 208,321 tons of ore, double the amount that was 
sent out in the year 1906. The mine is served by the C. P. R., and the haul being short, the 
transportation is cheap and expeditious. Normally about 200 men are employed at the Mother 
Lode, the company having an excellent boarding-house, bunk-house and a number of com- 
modious cottages. 

For a number of years the Mother Lode was worked to a large extent on the "glory-hole'' 
system, but in the last year or two the development and shipping has been nearly all from the 
underground levels. In this connection 746 feet of sinking and upraising and 2,058 feet of 
cross-cutting and drifting has been done, besides 1,925 feet of diamond-drill boring. The four- 
compartment shaft was deepened and the 400-foot level extensively opened up, shewing a large 
additional tonnage of copper ore in sight. 

In this camp is also located the Sunset group of mines, owned by the 

Sunset. Dominion Copper Co. The ore of the Sunset has a large percentage of iron, 

which is useful in fluxing at the smelter of the company. Lately the copper 

values contained in the ore have increased, thereby adding greatly to the value of the property. 

Last year the mine shipped 31,258 tons of ore to the company's own smelter at Boundary 

Falls. 

The Sudbury property, acquired last year by Spokane capitalists, is another promising 
claim in this camp. A machinery plant has been installed and a 200-foot shaft sunk, in which 
good copper ore has been exposed. 

Several hundred feet of work were done on the Golconda group in the southern quarter of 
this camp, a group owned largely by Quebec men, and which promises to be a mine of import- 
ance when sufficient development work has been accomplished. 



L 112 Report of the Minister "of Mines. 1908 



The Moreen is another Deadwood Camp mine, with electric equipment, and owned by 
Minneapolis capital, that has had considerable work done thereon last year, and that has the 
earmarks of turning out well when more fully developed. 

On the Greyhound, in the same camp, a good deal of work was done under bond, with 
encouraging results, so far as known. 

Summit Camp. 

In Summit Camp the most important mines are now owned and operated by the British 
Columbia Copper Company. Chief among these is the Emma and the Oro Denoro. The 
Emma has been worked steadily, the Hall Mining and Smelting Company owning a quarter 
interest. The ore has always been chiefly valuable for its iron contents, and is gladly 
received by the smelters on this account. When the smelters owning the property do not 
need the ore, a ready market is found for it at the other reduction works. 

In the last two or three years better copper values have been found in the ores of the 
Emma, greatly increasing the mine's value. Extensive development through an inclined shaft 
has proven the ore-bodies to be much larger and more valuable than at first thought. One 
hundred and fifty feet of sinking and upraising, 125 feet of cross-cutting, and 631 feet of 
diamond drill work was done. A 200 h.p. motor, driving a 12 drill Rand compressor and five 
Sullivan drills, were installed ; a bunk-house for the accommodation of 35 men, with bath- 
room, office and store-room, powder-house and boiler-house erected. Eighteen thousand two 
hundred and seventy-four tons of ore were shipped, the bulk of this going to the Granby Co.'s 
smelter at Grand Forks. 

Adjoining the Emma is the Oro Denoro, which is essentially a quarrying proposition, the 
ore being easily handled and shipped by either the Great Northern or the C.P.R. The Emma 
vein is supposed to extend into the Oro Denoro. The 700-foot tunnel was enlarged, 130 feet 
of sinking was done, 800 feet of surface trenching excavated, and 1,432 feet of diamond drill 
prospecting accomplished. A Hodfields steel crusher, two big steel dump cars, a 100 h. p- 
motor, a belt conveyor and rope drive were installed, and a building over the crusher plant, 
an ore bin of 1,200 tons capacity, a building for tranformers and one-third of a mile of railway 
spurs built. Fourteen thousand four hundred and eighty-one tons of ore were shipped to the 
British Columbia Copper Company's smelter. 

From the B.C. mine, belonging to the same company, but situated in the Grand Forks 
Division, 1,712 tons of ore were shipped to their smelter. 

The following is a summary of the tonnage treated at the three district plants in the 
Boundary District for 1907, the figures being official : — ■ 

Granby Smelter, Grand Forks 637,626 tons. 

British Columbia Copper Co.'s smelter, Greenwood 311,952 .i 

Dominion Copper Company's smelter, Boundary Falls .... 153,139 n 

Total 1,133,017 ,. 

Graxby Smelter. 
At the Granby smelter little was done during May, November and December, the results 
being confined to about nine months of operations. Therefore, the smelter had but a short 
time in which to get its recently enlarged battery of eight furnaces in fullest operation. 
During the year many improvements were made about this plant, including new steel furnace 
buildings, steel flue dust chamber, greatly enlarged ore and coke bunkers, etc. The plant is 
now in condition to maintain a steady tonnage of 3,000 tons of ore per diem, or more, even 
when allowing for minor delays for repairs. Following was the tonnage treated in 1907, by 
months : — 





snyrn 



■*r» 



B. C. Bureau of Mines. 

CAMP AND No. 1 TIPPLE— NICOLA VALLEY COAL AND COKE CO, 




B.C. Bureau of Mines. 

No. 2 TIPPLE, MIDDLESBORO COLLIERY MICOLA VALLEY C. 



8 Ed. 7 



Boundary District. 



L 113 



January 31,1 18 tons. 

February 34,864 

March. 67,525 

April 72,170 

May 5,343 

June 75,934 



July 80,261 tons. 

August 55,295 n 

September 79,167 m 

October 91,690 .. 

November 41,320 n 



Total 634,687 m 

Of the above amount, only 21,118 tons consisted of custom ores, the balance, or 613,569 
tons, being ore received from the Company's Phcenix mines during the year. 

Greenwood Smelter. 
At the smelter of the British Columbia Copper Co. the year showed a gain of more than 
100 per cent, over 1906, in point of tonnage treated. A new crushing plant, with additional 
ore bins and conveyor, has been installed during the year, with electric drive, and the water 
system has been duplicated. Additional slag hauling equipment has also been installed, and 
additions made to the machine shop. The following is the tonnage treatment by months for 
the past year : — 



January 21,133 tons. 

February 15,427 m 

March.. 23,678 ., 

April 34,127 n 

May 29,969 .. 

June 44,316 n 



July 47,768 tons. 

August 38,161 ii 

September 35,567 n 

October 31,334 „ 

November 21,442 ,, 

December , 



Total 342,922 „ 

The above tonnage consisted approximately of the following : — 

Ore from Mother Lode mine 213,304 tons. 



n Emma 

H Oro Denoro 

" Snowshoe 

ii Lone Star & Washington . . . 

B. C. Mine 

Other material from British Columbia. 
H ii United States . . . 



•3,113 

16,499 

84,337 

1,584 

1,712 

5.370 

15,536 



At the Boundary Falls Smelter of the Dominion Copper Company, no custom ore was 
treated, the monthly totals being as follows : — 



January 11,933 tons. 

February 7,216 

March/. 20,315 

April 13,961 

May 1,207 

June 17,309 



July 23,052 tons. 

August 28,577 n 

September 22,197 m 

October 7,669 n 

November .... 

December .... 



Total tons 153,436 

Average prices of electrolytic copper at New York, 1906 and 1907. 



Month. 1906. 1907. 

January 18.31 24.40 

February 17 86 24.87 

March/.... 18.36 25.07 

April 18.37 24.22 

Mav 18.47 24.05 

June 18.44 22.66 



Month. 190(3. 1907. 

July 18.19 21.13 

August 18.38 18.35 

September 19.03 15.56 

October 21.20 13.17 

November 21.83 13.39 

December 22.88 13.16 



Yearly average 19.28 



20.00 



L 114 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



Office Statistics, Greenwood Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates issued 468 

Locations recorded (mineral) 19-1 

n (placer) 3 

Certificates of work recorded 413 

Conveyances recorded 139 



GRAND FORKS MINING DIVISION. 

Report of S. R. Almond, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit the following report of the conditions of mining in the Grand 
Forks Mining Division for the year 1907 : — 

Owing to the trouble in the coal mines, from whence the smelters in the Boundary country 

draw their coal and coke supplies, in the early part of the year, and to the closing down of 

both mines and smelters in the latter part of the season, the output for the year has been 

greatly curtailed. 

The Granby Smelter. 

Operations in this smelter did not cover much more than about two-thirds of the year, and 
yet the tonnage treated for that period was some 634,687 tons of ore, as against a tonnage of 
840,000 for the twelve months preceding the time above mentioned. The month of October 
seems to have been the month in which the work proceeded to best advantage, as, in that 
month, the smelter ran through 91,690 tons of ore. Many improvements were made to the 
plant during the year, such as a new steel furnace building, a steel dust chamber, and the 
capacity of the ore and coke bunkers greatly increased, and, under fair conditions, the plant 
should be capable of putting through at least 3,000 tons of ore per day. Mr. J. P. Graves is 
reported as having said " that by the middle of next summer the company would be justified 
in increasing its capacity by at least 1,000 tons a day." If this is done, the capacity of the 
smelter would be increased so that the treatment of ore would be carred over the million tons 

a year mark. 

The Granby Mines. 

The mines are partly in the Greenwood and partly in the Grand Forks Mining Divisions, 
with headquarters near the Old Ironsides mine at Phoenix. The company employed about 500 
men in and around its mines. The machinery is all of the best and up-to-date, and the motive 
power is electricity, furnished by the South Kootenay Power and Light Company. 

The Gold Drop-Curhiv group, of the Granby Mines, lies within the Grand Forks Mining 
Division. Development work has been pushed during the last year, ore.bodies of great size 
and importance have been opened up, and machinery, in the shape of crushers and conveyors, is 
being put in, and ore-bins built. 

The C. P. Ry. has built a spur to these mines, at a heavy outlay, but as this will be an 
important point of outlet for ore — for in the future it is proposed to connect these workings 
with those in the older mines, as the ore-bodies, at depth, are supposed to be one and the 
same — the spur should prove a good investment. 

The Dominion Copper Company's Mines. 

These mines, like those of the Granby Company's, are partly in both Mining Divisions, 
but the Raivliide mine, in the Grand Forks Mining Division, is the largest producer of this 
company's Boundary mines. It has been opened up by the driving of six tunnels, and is 



8 Ed. 7 Boundary District. L 11; 



capable of an output of over 1,000 tons of ore per day. The company's mines are supplied 
with electricity, for power, by the same company as supplies the Granby Company, and as 
producers they come only second to that company. The company's smelter is situated at 
Boundary Falls, on Boundary creek, some 20 odd miles from the field of mining 

This company also works the Mountain Hose, in Summit camp, as the ore, on account of 
the quantity of iron contained in it, is valuable to them as a flux. 

The Consolidated Mixing & Smelting Company op Canada. 

This Company's chief source of supply, from the Boundary country, is the Snowshoe mine, 
in Wellington Camp, Grand Forks Mining Division, and on which mine the company has, 
during the year, spent thousands of dollars in development. Although the mine only shipped 
ore for about nine months of the year, it managed to pile up the figures to 135,000 tons. 

During the year this company purchased the TFar Eagle group of claims. This property 
is also located in the Grand Forks Mining Division, and was always considered property of 
merit, but as to this last, the company ought to be in a position to satisfy themselves, as they 
have had the diamond drill at work on it most of the time during the season. 

The smelter owned by this company is situated at Trail, over 100 miles from these mines. 
The British Columbia Copper Company. 

This company's properties in Summit Camp in the Grand Forks Mining Division of Yale 
District, are the Emma, Oro Denoro, and B. C. mines. The first of these, the Emma, was at 
the start chiefly worked for the amount of iron contained in its ores, but for some time past 
the ore has been found to be improving in value in copper. Through an incline shaft this 
pi'operty has been well developed. 

Next to and adjoining the above claim lies the Oro Denoro, which is worked on the 
quarrying system, and is supposed to be on the same vein as the Emma. As the Great 
Northern and C. P. R. tracks both run alongside this mine, it has the advantage of being able 
to ship by either railway. 

The B. C. mine, the oldest shipping mine in the Boundary, lies about one mile from the 
Emma. This mine had shipped over 100,000 tons of ore before coming into possession of this 
company. It is served by a spur from the C. P. Railway. 

During the summer some Vancouver parties did a little work' on the Golden Eagle, in 
Brown's Camp, and shipped three car-loads of ore to the Granby smelter, but closed down 
again in the beginning of November. 

The various camps in this Mining Division have been very quiet during the last summer; 
only in one or two cases was anything more than assessment work done, and that little extra 
work was principally done in Franklin Camp, on the north fork of Kettle river. 

The following tables may possibly be of some interest : — 

Ore produced in the Boundary for the last eight years. 

1900 '. ... 103,426 tons. 1901 801,925 tons. 

1901 396,210 ,. 1905 965,628 „ 

1902 ; 521,402 „ 1906 1,182,517 ., 

1903 697,284 ,. 1907 

Ore shipped from mines in the Grand Forks Mining Division during 1907. 

Snowshoe 135,000 tons. . Rawhide 64,173 tons. 

Emma 18,274 it Mountain Rose 3,999 n 

Oro Denoro 14,481 n Golden Eagle 60 n 

B. C 1,712 „ 



L 116 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



Shipment of ore from Granby Mines to Granby Smelter during year 1907. 

January 31,192 tons. July 80,216 tons. 

February 32,465 n August 54,077 m 

March 63,826 n September 71,667 it 

April 70,518 „ October 86,711 .. 

May 5,072 .. November 39,005 >. 

June 72,820 m December (shutdown) 



Total 613,569 tons. 

Tonnage treated at Granby Smelter during year 1907. 

January 31,118 tons. July 80,261 tons. 

February 31,861 .. August 55,295 m 

March 67,525 n September 79,167 n 

April 72,170 n October 91,690 ,, 

May 5,313 n November 11,320 n 

June 75,931 n December 



Of this, 21,118 tons was custom ore. Total 631,687 tons. 

The cost of production, per pound of copper, was 10.11 cents, as against 8.35 cents for 
the preceding year. 

Office Statistics— Grand Forks Mixing Division. 

Locations 161 

Certificates of work. 112 

Transfers 70 

Agreements . . o 

Certificates of improvement '. 26 

Water records 2 

Filing notices to do work 63 

Free miners' certificates 267 

Special free miners' certificates 1 



OSOYOOS MIXING DIVISION. 
Report of Jas. R. Brown, Gold Commissioner, Fairview, JB. C. 

I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report of the mining operations in the 
Osoyoos Mining Division for the year 1907. 

Operations during the year in Fairview were principally confined to the Stemwinder mine, 
the workings on the lower and upper Keremeos valley, Camp Hedley, and the adjoining 
country ; and on Kruger mountain. I give below a short account of the different work done, 
kindly sent in by Mr. H. Lee, of Fairview ; Mr. R. W. Northey, of Olalla, and Mr. D. A. 
Carmichael, of Fairview. 

This mine is the property of The Stemwinder Gold and Coal Company. 
Stemwinder. During this year the work progressed steadily, and the result of develop- 
ment has justified the anticipations of the management. It may be 
remembered that the company operating this mine ran out of funds after re-locating the ore- 
body on the 200-foot level under a fault that completely cut off all ore on the 200-foot and 
300-foot levels, then the lowest in the mine. The management considered that the appearance 
of the ore below the fault warranted further expenditure, and a reorganisation scheme was 
very successful in providing ample funds for additional exploration, which has consisted of 



8 Ed. 7 Boundary District. L 11' 



sinking a perpendicular shaft, -ii feet by 9 feet in the clear, from the surface close to the 
46-stamp mill to the 500-foot level. The new shaft connects with the old workings on the 
200-foot level by a cross-cut and on the 300-foot level intersects with the former inclined shaft. 
There are three ledges on the property, known as the North, Main and South ledges, two of 
which only (the North and Main ledges) have been worked heretofore. On the 200-foot level 
a cross-cut from the Main ledge was run 70 feet north and opened up the North ledge there, 
which is about 4 feet 6 inches wide. On the 300-foot level the Main ledge was cut, showing 
12 feet of clean, high-grade ore. In the new shaft, at 350 feet the Main ledge was cut, showing 
12 feet of clean, high-grade ore. On the 100-foot level a cross-cut was run 25 feet and opened 
up the Main ledge there, 12 feet wide and of good average value ; this cross-cut is now being 
extended to open up the Xorth ledge. On the 500-foot level, at the station, the new shaft 
ran into the south ledge, a fine body of ore on which sufficient work has not yet been done to 
afford very definite information. It is over 6 feet wide and carries good values on the part 
opened. A cross-cut has been commenced on this level to the Main ledge, 80 feet from the 
station, and the North ledge about 66 feet farther. All the ore opened up is below the fault, 
is in solid ground and carries good values. 

A 150 h.p. Jenckes hoist and two new boilers, which will increase the boiler capacity at 
present available to about 300 h.p., are ordered. The mill and cyanide plant are being put 
in shape for steady work in the spring and the capacity of the latter increased, the new head- 
works and ore-bins are also in course of preparation. 

The company operating this mine has recently concluded an agreement with the Strathyre 
Company, of Montreal, formerly working claims in the camp, for the purchase of its property 
and effects. This arrangement is of great importance locally, as it enlarges the sphere of 
Stemwinder operations (two of the five claims purchased adjoining the Stemicinder group) and 
will mean work on property otherwise idle. 

Upper and Lower Keremeos Yalley. 

Throughout this section very little work outside of assessments has been done this year, 
although two properties at Camp Beaconsfield have pushed development, and the Dolphin at 
Olalla. As the new railway is now completed to Keremeos, it is the general belief that 1908 
will see a great improvement in mining conditions in the Similkameen and Keremeos valleys. 
The following are the operations in the various camps during the past year : — 

Riordan Mountain. 

The famous Billy Goat claim is now Crown-granted and no work was 
Billy Goat. done on it this 3'ear, but all the other claims on the mountain received 
attention. On the west of the Billy Goat, James Riordan did considerable 
work on the ledge of chalcopyrite he discovered the year before on the Resort claim. On the 
west it is in contact with a granular limestone and on the east the formation is schist. The 
strike is N. E. and S. W., with nearly vertical dip. It seems to parallel the ledge on the 
Billy Goat. The capping is close to the surface, being covered by only three feet of soil, and 
all the assays made so far have given pay values in gold, silver and copper. 

The Homestake, adjoins the Billy Goat on the south, and is owned by 

Homestake. Northey and Hayes, of Olalla. A lead of good grade ore about 8 feet 

wide, chietlv garnetite carrying yellow copper with magnetic iron and iron 

pyrites, was drifted on and the breast of the tunnel still shows the continuance of the ore- 

bodv, but of a higher grade than was taken out in the first 10 feet, the last assay giving high 

values in gold, in addition to a fairly large percentage of copper and 16 ounces of silver. 



L 118 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



Camp Beaconsfield. 

The tunnel on the Standard was continued 40 feet farther and the ledge, which outcrops 
on the ridge, was intersected at a depth of 75 feet. The ore was of the same value as at the 
surface, showing no improvement. On the Gibraltar a new blacksmith shop was erected about 
100 feet from the shaft. For the first 21 feet the shaft is perpendicular and then dips to the 
east at an angle of 60 degrees. This was the first time the shaft had been unwatered since 
1901, and the fumes of the dynamite clung to the wet walls so persistently that the men were 
sick nearly all the time. It was intended to sink another 25 feet and then cross-cut, but 
rather than waste time waiting for a gas-dispersing appliance, work was started in the 
Guinevieve No. 1 tunnel, where the breast is in good-looking ore, but not of very high grade 
as yet. The work done on this group during the year was 110 feet of tunnelling, 10 feet of 
shaft and several open cuts. 

In the Gem group an immense outcrop of pyrrhotite and arsenical iron, 200 feet wide, is 
traced right on to the Gibraltar claim on the top of the mountain. In the long tunnel on the 
Gem some good grade ore was met with, garnetite carrying yellow copper, and the work this 
year was all done in this tunnel, which is now in nearly 300 feet. The owners are James 
McNulty and Thomas Roderick, of Phoenix. 

Green Mountain. 

Very little work was done in this camp, many of the claims being Crown-granted. On 
the Green Mountain claim, owned by James Black et al., a large hole has been sunk on the ledge 
and good copper values met with at a depth of 12 feet. The actual size of the ore-body has 
not been ascertained, but it is evidently large at that particular point. 

Independence Mountain. 

The Horseshoe group of three claims, owned by Matthison and McDonald, situated on one 
of the eastern spurs of Independence mountain, was located in the summer of 1906 and the 
first assessment done in 1907. The ledge has been uncovered for some distance, showing it to 
be at least 20 feet in width. The ore is pyrrhotite and arsenical iron, carrying values in gold 
and a little copper. The work done during the year includes a series of open cuts, the main 
one being 22 feet long, 12 feet wide and 10 feet face. 

The owners of the Anasis, Messrs. Matthison, McNulty and Roderick, did considerable 
work during the year and opened the big ledge for nearly the whole length of the claim. Some 
white arsenical iron that was taken out assayed high in gold. 

The Dominion and Pine Apple are two claims situated on the south-western slope of 
Independence mountain, owned by Alex. Ford. A big ledge of pyrrhotite (magnetic iron 
pyrites), including considerable garnetite carrying yellow copper on the footwall side, the out- 
crop being 35 feet wide. The ore is of good grade for a large part of this width. The chief 
work done this year was sinking the shaft to 16 feet and timbering same from surface. 

Assessments were done on the Cornell group, the Lone Star, King Arthur, Gordon group 
and some other claims in this camp. 

Dividend Mountain. 

Most of the claims in this camp are Crown-granted and no work was done on them. The 
Scotia group consists of five claims on the northern slope, owned by McDonald and Wheadon, 
of Olalla. Two parallel ledges, about 500 feet apart, traverse this group from N. E. to S. W., 
the ore in both being magnetic iron pvrites with garnetite carrying yellow copper of pay grade. 



8 Ed. 7 Boundary District. L 119 



Both ledges have been cut into in several places, showing the average width to be between 10 and 
12 feet. The work done in 1907 consisted of open cuts along the leads to prove their con- 
tinuance. 

The Mountain Rose is owned by L. A. Clark et ah The ore is pyrrhotite and arsenical 
iron, carrying values in gold, copper and silver, and occurs between granite and quartzite. The 
work done in 1907 was a 10-foot shaft sunk in the lead, which at that point is four feet wide. 

The Nellie, owned by James Black, shows a very large outcrop of the usual pyrrhotite and 
arsenical iron, opened on in several places by surface cuts. Assays show fairly good values in 
gold and copper. Work done this year was open cuts. 

Olalla Camp. 

On the Mount Zion there are two parallel ledges about 1,000 feet apart, both running 
N. E. and S. W. and about the same width, 8 feet. The ore at surface may be termed high- 
grade, carrying good values in gold, silver and copper, but there is also some p3 r rrhotite that is 
of lower grade. The work done this year was stripping the lower ledge and open-cutting the 
upper one. 

The Dolphin is situated one mile south of Olalla and three miles north 
Dolphin. of Keremeos railwa} T station, and is most favourably placed for economical 

working. Ever since the start in November, 1906, work has been steadily 
prosecuted during the past twelve months, with the exception of a few weeks' shut-down this 
fall. The working force has varied from six to twelve men, and something like 100 tons of ore 
has been stored for shipment. The workings consist of 1,200 feet of tunnelling and 50 feet of 
upraise, with numerous open cuts all over the slope of the hill. There are eight tunnels in all, the 
longest being in 275 feet. An aerial tramway was completed in November and is now working 
satisfactorily. The cable, which is 1,050 feet in length, carrying two buckets of appioxi- 
mately 100 lbs. capacit}^, stretches from the portal of No. 1 tunnel to the 100- ton ore bin at 
the foot of the hill, dumping automatically. A platform has been erected at Keremeos station 
calculated to hold between 30 and 10 tons, and already about 20 tons have been hauled from 
the mine to the station. This shipment, which is to be sent to the Northport smelter, is for 
the purpose of testing the actual value of the ore by authentic smelter returns. The ore assays 
high in copper, and profitable results are anticipated. 

A large number of the claims in this camp are Crown-granted and only assessments were 
done on those that are not Crown-granted. It is not necessary to enumerate them here. 

Camp Hedley. 

While there were many drawbacks to lessen both production and development in mining 
in Camp Hedley in 1907, the year was nevertheless marked by much good work and important 
results. 

On the Nickel Plate group, owned by the Yale Mining Co., the total 
Nickel Plate. neglect of development work which marked the year 1906 and the confining 
of all work to extraction, has, during the past year, given place to a saner 
and more progressive policy. The present manager, Mr. F. A. Ross, who entered upon his 
duties about the last month of 1906, had a difficult task to perform in re-organising the entire 
concern, for it was not alone in the complete cessation of development work that the enter- 
prise had suffered under his predecessor, but in the feverish anxiety to extract from the richer 
portions of the mine and make a record production, the plant had been driven beyond its 
capacity and was on the verge of going to pieces for lack of care and repairs. Unfortunately 
for Mr. Ross, but in a sense providential, the unprecedented rigour of the winter of 1907 froze 



L 120 Report of the Minister or Mines. 1908 



up the flume, cutting off the water supply in the second week in January, compelling a shut- 
down of mining and milling operations for three months. This period of stoppage was taken 
advantage of for a complete overhauling of the mill and flume, and the middle of April saw 
everything again in full swing. A systematic course of development and exploration was laid 
out for the season and rigidly executed, new ore-bodies being found on the Nickel Plate and 
Sunnysides and on the Woodland fraction convenient to the electric tram-line and worked by 
"glory hole." Two new "glory holes" and three new inclines were opened and new ore- 
bodies were located and opened in stopes which the previous management had abandoned. In 
the exploratory work, diamond drilling was most effectively employed, complete sampling and 
record of the cores being made, and 7,800 feet bored during the season. The tonnage of ore 
mined and milled during the year, notwithstanding the loss of three months' time, was 31,756 
tons, principally from the Nickel Plate and Sunnysides claims. The ore carries values in gold 
of about $14 to the ton. 

There was no further extension of the plant, although many changes and additions were 
made that were necessary to meet the wants of a more complete system of operating. By 
them the duty per stamp has been increased from 2.9 tons to 3.35 tons every twenty -four 
hours. Among the changes was the addition of another 30-foot conical-bottomed slime tank 
to the cyanide plant, and extension of the assay laboratory by addition of a room for preparing 
the samples so as to secure greater accuracy. New head-gear was also put in at the central 
station on the gravity tramway, which has materially increased the capacity of the tramway. 
The completion of the Great Northern Railway to Keremeos shortened haulage of the concen- 
trates from 52 miles to 20 miles, and, as construction of the grade to Hedley is in progress at 
Hedley itself, it is fully expected that before half of 1908 has gone the Daly Reduction Co. 
will be able to load concentrates directly from the mill into the Great Northern cars on either 
a side track or a short spur. 

On the Kingston group, owned by the Kingston Gold and Copper 
Kingston. Mining Co., development work has been prosecuted steadily during the year. 

About $6,000 was expended, with great improvement to the property. 
Most of the work was done on the War Horse mineral claim and resulted in showing up a 
considerable extent of ore in which copper showed up in greater quantities than before. 
Much of this work was in surface cuts and in tunnels, which makes it difficult to convey any 
relative idea of the extent of work done. The completion of the railway to Hedley this year 
will enable shipments to be made. As the development has reached a stage where power is 
necessary, the company will have to deal with this matter before much more is done. 

The Oregon group of four claims on Sixteen-Mile creek was given considerable work 
during the year, there being about 150 feet of tunnel driven. The Oregon carries copper with 
encouraging gold values. The principal owners are I. L. Deardorff and F. H. French. 

The Golden Zone group of four claims is owned by J. J. Marks, Paul Broadhagen and 
James Murphy, and during the year T. H. Marks obtained an interest. Steps were taken to 
place this property on the producing list, A five-stamp mill has been procured and a road has 
been made to draw it in to the mine, together with building material and supplies, and 
buildings have been put up to accommodate the men. 

The Florence group of three claims witnesses considerable development each year and 1907 
has been no exception. Mr. George M. Gilbert has obtained an interest with Thomas Brad- 
shaw in the property. 

A number of other mineral claims have had the usual assessment done by individual 
holders, and on various Crown-granted claims the owners have done some work. 



8 Ed. 7 Boundary District. L 121 



An important feature of the year was the work done by Charles Camsell, of the Canadian 
Geological Survey. The work occupied the entire summer and is not yet completed. It 
consisted of obtaining data for a topographic map of the camp, covering three miles east and 
west and four miles north and south. The scale of the map is to be 1,000 feet to the inch, 
with contour intervals of 100 feet. Geological studies were carried on in conjunction with the 
topographic work, special attention being paid to the occurrence of ore deposits, their origin 
and history. Mr. Camsell was assisted by J. J. Allen and A. O. Hayes, and in the topographic 
work had also the assistance of W. H. Boyd. In this connection it may also be mentioned 
that special attention was paid by the manager of the Daly Reduction Co., to working out 
structural geology on the Xickle Plate group, in connection with the diamond drilling done 
during the season. By this means much accurate data has been obtained. 

Kruger Mountain. 

Under the auspices of the Dominion Fairview Copper Company, Ltd., of London, Eng., 
the following work was done. The company's properties consist of the Waneta, Favourite, 
and Waterdoivn Fraction. These properties were operated by the company during the summer 
and fall of 1907, and although the showing was not very encouraging, still quite a bit of work 
was done. A shaft was extended on the Waneta from former working, to a depth of 50 feet, 
with fair results ; a shaft on the Waterdoivn Fraction was sunk to about 55 feet and a tunnel 
was run 18 feet. "Work has been closed down for the winter and a member of the company's 
Board of Directors is expected to arrive early in spring to examine and report as to the con- 
tinuance of the work. On the Favourite a shaft was sunk 18 feet, late in the fall, also another 
shaft about 15 feet. The total force employed was an average of six men. There will no 
doubt be a resumption of the work, as the results show a copper ore fit for smelting. 

Office Statistics — Osoyoos Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates 247 

Records of locations 167 

Certificates of work 296 

Transfers and agreements 46 

Certificates of improvements 30 



CAMP HEDLEY, OSOYOOS MINING DIVISION, B. C. 

By Charles Camsell. 

{From Summary Report of Geological Survey of Canada, 1907.) 

The important mining camp of Hedley is situated on the north side of the Similkameen 
river, at the mouth of Twenty-mile creek, in the Osoyoos Mining Division of British Columbia. 
It comprises about 100 surveyed and Crown-granted mineral claims, and many others on which 
the annual assessment work is still being done, all covering a sheet of about 12 square miles. 
It was discovered in the year 1896, when nine claims were staked on the ground overlooking 
Twenty-mile creek. Each succeeding year found more and more prospectors impressed with 
the possibilities of the camp, and more claims were taken up, until in 1900 virtually all the 
ground now included in Camp Hedley was staked out. The largest property owners in the 
camp, the Yale Mining Company, were early on the ground and commenced the work of 
prospecting their most important claims early in 1899. The preliminary work undoubtedly 
proved satisfactory, for they shortly after showed their faith in their prospects by beginning 
the building of a tram-line, flume and stamp and cyanide mill, a work entailing the outlay of 
hundreds of thousands of dollars. Though it is a little more than three years from the time 



L 122 Report of the Minister of Mixes. 1908 



the first ton was milled, and the ore is extracted from only two claims, the camp has since 
justified their faith in it by becoming the largest producer of gold alone of any camp in British 
Columbia. It is very probable, as development goes on and transportation difficulties are 
overcome, new ore-bodies will be discovered and other known ore-bodies of lower grade will 
be worked, for the history of mining is only now beginning in this portion of the Similkameen 
district. 

As the only previous work done in this neighbourhood was the reconnaissance of Dr. 
Dawson in 1877, when there was not the slightest suspicion of such valuable ore occurring, it 
will be readily seen how urgent was the need of the work of a Geological Survey party. 

The field work of the season was in part devoted to the acquiring of data for a topographic 
map of the camp, which will cover, when completed, three miles from the east to west, and four 
miles from north to south. The scale on which this is being prepared is 1,000 feet to the inch, 
with a contour interval of 100 feet. Geological studies were carried on at the same time in 
conjunction with the topographic work, and special attention was paid to the occurrence of 
the ore deposits, their origin and history ; but the attempt to do both simultaneously and with 
the same party was responsible for neither being finished at the close of the season. Much 
credit is due for their zeal and co-operation to my two assistants, Messrs. J. A. Allan and A. 
O. Hayes, who, besides assisting in the geological work, are to be credited with a great deal 
of the topography. 

The method employed in mapping the district was that suggested by Mr. W. H. Boyd 
as likely to give the greatest accuracy for the time and means at hand. Triangulation 
on signals from an accurately measured base gave a number of fixed points on the sheet. 
Traverses were run with transit and stadia of all the waggon roads in the district, 
as well as most of the trails, the tram-lines and flume ; and the detail was filled in 
with the plane table and stadia-readings. Elevations were obtained from a Canadian Pacific 
Railway bench-mark corrected to sea level. This gave the town of Hedley as 1,620 feet, and 
the highest point in the sheet as 6,660 feet above sea level. The unfinished portion, which 
covers the north-west quarter of the sheet, is much too rough and steep to be done in this way, 
and will have to be done by photographic surveying. 

The work was also considerably facilitated by the interest taken in it by many of the 
people of the district. The Daly Reduction Company, through their manager, Mr. Ross, placed 
every convenience in our way, and the use of the gravity tram saved much time and hard 
labour. And of those to whom I am particularly indebted for information I may mention 
Messrs. F. M. Wells, C. E. Oliver, J. Gladden, A. Megraw ; as well as the officials of the Yale 
Mining Company and the Daly Reduction Company. 

Topographic Features, 
Camp Hedley lies on the western side of the Okanagan range of mountains, whose highest 
points here reach an elevation of a little more than 7,000 feet above sea level. The neigh- 
bouring country is characterised by comparatively rounded outline and moderate relief to the 
east and south, but the north-western portion lies in the deep and narrow canyon of Twenty- 
mile creek, where extremely rugged and precipitous conditions prevail. The part of the valley 
of this creek whieh lies in our map is V-shaped, and about 4,000 feet in depth. The slopes on 
either side are very steep, and frequently impossible to climb. Broken rock talus slopes 
topped by precipitous bluffs are everywhere very common, while the narrow box-canyons cut 
by the torrential streams in the mountain side are nothing more than mere gashes almost 
imperceptible from the opposite side of the valley. These canyons are frequently the only 
possible means of ascending or descending the mountain side, while the ridges between them 
are quite impossible to explore. 



8 Ed. 7 Boundary District. L 123 



The action of erosion in this canyon is very strong, and is equal, if not in advance of, the 
decomposition of the rocks by oxidation, and the finding of secondary surface deposits of 
oxidised ores is not to be expected where such conditions prevail. Every shower of rain 
throughout the summer washes down the canyon sides masses of rock that only a little under- 
mining was sufficient to dislodge, so that the Daly Reduction Company, whose flume runs for 
three miles through the canyon, has to keep men on the watch night and day to guard against 
or repair accidents from falling rocks. Drift does not cover the rocks in this section, so that 
in its accessible parts the geological relations are easily studied. 

On the slope of Eighteen-mile «creek and overlooking the Similkameen river the physical 
features are not so bold, and the conditions are not unlike those which hold over the rest of 
the Interior Plateau. This part is not heavily wooded and the southern faces are usually 
devoid of all timber. The slopes are not so steep that drift will not rest, and unless exposed 
by the pick and shovel of the prospector outcrops of rock are rare. The prospector who owns 
claims on this side of the hill is likely to incur a great deal more expense in prospecting, and 
he is also more likely when he does locate an ore body to find it very much more oxidized and 
enriched on the surface than in the Twenty-mile canyon. 

For the diversity of physical conditions on the two sides of the hill, one must look to 
glacial causes. Looking at the valley of the Similkameen river from the top of the gravity 
tram-line, and particularly to the southward, one is at once struck by its glacial outlines. The 
steep sides and broad drift-filled bottom make a well-defined U-shape that is characteristic of 
all valleys modified by the scouring action of a glacier. Typical also are the many hanging 
valleys that may be noted on the south side. Henry creek, Susanne creek and John creek 
all steepen suddenly in grade on approaching the main valley, and have not yet had time since 
the disappearance of the glacier to carve out a valley of uniform grade. The deep canyon of 
Twenty-mile creek may also be attributable to the same cause. The retreating glacier which 
filled the Similkameen valley eventually left the Twenty-mile creek occupying a hanging valley 
and emptying into the main valley by a short steep fall at its mouth. While the smaller 
streams were unable in the time since the disappearance of the glacier to cut down their valleys, 
Twenty-mile creek, with its larger volume and greater erosive power, was able to deepen its 
own bed in the rock and to form its present V-shaped valley. In this work it may have 
been materially assisted by taking advantage of the numerous faults and fractures that are 
found in these rocks, and which are the results of many and long-continued periods of vul- 
canism. The only other way to account for this Twenty-mile canyon is by a recent uplift of 
this portion of the earth's crust, of which there is not any corroborative evidence to be found 
in the surrounding country. 

The whole Camp Hedley area was co/ered by ice during the glacial period. Though 
glacial striae were never noted, boulders transported by glacial action are found scattered over 
the summits of its highest hills. 

General Geology. 

The geological history of the area is somewhat complicated, and while the general 
sequence of events has been roughly worked out, there are yet many details which will require 
more study both in the field and in the office. 

From the time its first sediments were laid down in the sea, the region has been the scene 
of much volcanic activity. Igneous rocks of different kinds have been instrumental in altering 
the older rocks, so that now it is often impossible to state definitely whether some of these 
older rocks were originally igneous or sedimentary. 

The oldest rocks are the sedimentaries that cover the greater proportion of the surface. 
They all belong to one series, and have been referred to the Cache Creek group of Dawson's 



L 121 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



classification. Xo determinable fossils have yet been found in them, but the lithological 
characters of the strata are very similar to the original Cache Creek rocks first described 
farther to the north. 

These sediments are of great thickness, and as their prevailing dip is towards the west, 
a section from east to west across the sheet would give the succession in ascending order. 
This east and west section shows the following : — (1) red, grey and some black argillaceous 
and silicious beds interstratified in thin bands ; (2) blue and white limestone, much altered 
and crystalline, with some silicious beds and breccia ; (3) argillaceous and silicious beds on 
the west side of Twenty -mile creek and extending some distance beyond the limits of the sheet. 
Interbedded with these are a great number of sheets of andesite highly mineralised with 
arsenopyrite and weathering to a reddish colour that gives to the sides of the mountain the 
beautifully banded appearance which evoked the name of Striped mountain from Dr. Dawson. 

All of these beds have been more or less altered by igneous intrusions, but those which have 
suffered most are the calcareous ones of the middle division. This division has also proved the 
most congenial for the formation of ore deposits, for in it lie the two producing claims on the 
'hill, the Nickel Plate and the Sunnyside. The beds in which the ore bodies of these two claims 
occur have probably been originally limestone beds which become more or less impure towards 
the top, and near the contact of the igneous rocks have been altered by the addition of more 
silica to a rock made up largely of epidote and garnet with quartz and calcite. In other parts 
the alteration has been to pyroxene, or again to actinolite, but always with more or less 
garnet, epidote and calcite, depending upon the purity of the original beds. Irregular bodies 
of cherty rock are also frequently found in the contact metamorphic zone. About the centre 
of the sheet, in the P. S. draw, the alteration of the sediments has been to a rock made up 
almost entirely of garnets, and which is called garnetite. In portions of the Nickel Plate mine 
the metamorphosed rock has a distinctly banded appearance, due to the alternations of epidote 
and garnet in thin layers. Arsenopyrite is always a constituent of the contact metamorphic 
zone except where the igneous rock is granite. The monzonite and all its offshoots contain this 
mineral, and from them is migrated to the sediments. 

The sediments on the eastern edge of the sheet are nearly horizontal. At the Nickel Plate 
mine they dip about 20 degrees to the west, but gradually steepen on the west side of the hill 
to 35 and 40 degrees. Across Twenty-mile creek and westward the angle of dip increases until 
it reaches 90 degrees, and the strata becomes closely folded and compressed. 

Some volcanic activity probably took place while the rocks were yet beneath the sea, which 
would account for the interstratified beds of breccia and of possible tuffs. Numbers of andesite 
sheets were injected before the sediments were folded as they now are, while other dikes of the 
same material could only have been injected after the folding took place. 

The rock next in age to the sediments is a mass of monzonite forming a core nearly in the 
centre of the camp, and extending to the west side of Twenty-mile creek. The normal phase 
of this rock is rather basic in composition, and is made up of orthoclase and plagioclase in about 
equal proportions, much hornblende and some augite, biotite and quartz. A more acid rock, 
containing none or few of the dark coloured constituents, lies to the east of this and forms the 
very prominent Climax bluff. Each of these rocks sends off innumerable dikes and sheets of 
so-called andesite into the surrounding sedimentary rocks. The relation of these two rocks to 
each other is puzzling. Well marked contacts between the two are sometimes found, and these 
invariably show the acid rock to be the more recent. Apophyses of the more acid rock are also 
found in the basic. On the other hand, gradual transitions from the one to the other are 
frequently seen, and wide areas occur which appear to be intermediate in composition between 
the two extremes. Altogether it is probable that the two varieties were derived from the same 
magma, though their formation of crystallization may not have been contemporaneous. If not 



8 Ed. 7 Boundary District. L 12 j 



contemporaneous then the acid variety is later in age than the basic. The coarseness and 
evenness of the texture show their plutonic origin and that their crystallization took place far 
below the surface. 

The dikes and sheets derived from this monzonitic core are also of two varieties, and show 
much the same composition as the mass, but with the development of a porphyritic structure. 
The acid variety appears to be more often connected with ore deposits than the basic. 

Later than the monzonite is a large batholithic mass of granite, which forms the base of 
the hill overlooking the Similkameen river, and extends eastward across Eighteen-mile creek. 
This granite is similar to the large area of granite through which the river cuts for fifteen miles 
between Hedley and Princeton, and is probably part of the same intrusion, though separate 
for a short distance from it. It holds both orthoclase and plagioclase, with quartz, hornblende 
and biotite. A dike-like mass as an offshoot from this, 100 to 400 feet wide, is connected with 
the main mass on Eighteen-mile creek and runs diagonally across the hill to a point on Twenty- 
mile creek one mile above the town. The composition of this dike is slightly different, in that 
the hornblende is almost entirely replaced by biotite. Overlooking the Similkameen river the 
granite is in contact with the older sedimentary rocks, and this contact shows the granite 
truncating at an angle of about 30 degrees the edges of the sedimentary strata as well as the 
andesite sheets that are interbedded with them. The granite-monzonite contact on the 
Kingston draw shows many inclusions of monzonite in the granite, as well as apophyses of the 
granite in the monzonite. 

Quartz porphyry and aplite dikes that cut both the granite and the sediments in several 
places are probably to be referred to the final stages of the granite intrusion. 

A number of dikes of different composition follow the granite intrusion. Of these the 
most important are black and fine-grained, and are found in the northern and eastern parts of 
the sheet. They appear to radiate from a common centre near the foot of Bradshaw canyon. 
The texture of these dikes is felsitic, and in colour dark and reddish. For convenience it is 
called a felsite. It is rather silicious and like the monzonite contains much arsenopyrite. 
Segregated masses of this rock are met with in the monzonite apparently as a product of 
differentiation of the magma, showing that the two rocks are genetically connected, and under 
certain conditions the one might pass into the other. 

The latest rocks in the camp are dike rocks, lamprophyres, rhyolites and soft green dikes. 
These, like the granite, appear to be barren of any arsenopyrite, and are not associated with 
the ore bodies except perhaps accidentally. 

Economic Geology. 

Camp Hedley up to date is entirely a gold producer, though it gives promise of some 
copper production later on. 

The ore deposits belong to the class known as contact metamorphic deposits, that is to say, 
deposits that occur as the result of metamorphism of sedimentary rocks by igneous intrusions. 
The principal ore mineral is arsenopyrite, and the deposits are unique in the respect that 
arsenopyrite has never hitherto been found in such proportion to the other sulphides in contact 
deposits of this kind. 

The ore bodies lie in the sedimentary rocks and particularly in the second division of the 
section already mentioned. The large eruptive mass of monzonite lying nearly in the centre 
of the camp has itself been the cause of intense contact metamorphism in the sediments that it 
cuts. Moreover the large number of dikes and sheets of andesite which had their source in the 
monzonite are also responsible for a great deal of local metamorphism. It is along the contact 
of these igneous rocks and in the zone of contact metamorphism that ore bodies have been 
found. Primarily these igneous rocks may have been responsible for the introduction of the 



L 120 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



values, but other causes have been instrumental in concentrating these values to render them 
economically important. 

The granite is not important in this connection, while all the dikes have not been 
sufficiently studied to justify an opinion as to what influence the}' have exerted in the formation 
of ore bodies. 

The more acid variety of monzonite, and the sheets which it gives off, have caused, as a 
rule, the most intense contact metamorphism in the intruded rocks, and apparently the payable 
deposits are more generally associated with this variety. 

The sphere of influence of the monzonite core with its dikes and sheets covers the whole 
camp, but the action becomes feebler at a distance. Where the sediments have felt the direct 
influence of the mass the alteration has been extreme, and whole areas of what were originally 
calcareous rocks have been altered to garnetite. 

The zone of metamorphism in the sediments varies largely with their composition and the 
angle at which they are cut. The calcareous rocks lend themselves more readily to metamor- 
phism than the silicious or argillaceous rocks. They are also more congenial for the formation 
of ores. Both in the Nickel Plate and Sunnyside mines the ore bodies lie in what were 
originally limestones, the Nickel Plate stratum having been more impure than the Sunnyside. 

The contact metamorphic minerals developed in the sediments are garnet, epidote, calcite, 
pyroxene and actinolite, and with these are associated as ore minerals arsenopyrite, pyrrhotite, 
chalcopyrite, pyrite and specularite. The association of the oxides with the sulphides shows 
that they must have crystallised out under considerable pressure. Irregular bodies of hard 
cherty rock also occur near the contact, and probably owe their origin to an introduction of 
silica from the igneous rock. 

Though the gold is always associated with the arsenopyrite, a great deal of arsenopyrite 
occurs scattered through the metamorphosed rock in which very little gold is found. It is 
almost impossible to tell, except by assay, what the value of the ore will be, for it all looks 
very much alike. 

As a rule pyrrhotite is not associated with high gold values. Specularite, however, is a 
good indication. Chalcopyrite is common, though rarely in such quantities as to become 
important as an ore of copper. On the Warhorse mineral claim chalcopyrite occurs associated 
with pyrrhotite in sufficiently large bodies to make this claim a promising one, particularly as 
the ore also carries some values in gold and silver. Pyrrhotite is found massive on the 
Toronto and Galena workings and probably as a product of magmatic differentiation. On the 
Red Mountain it occurs in such quantities as to make the compass absolutely useless for 
surveying. 

The Yale Mining Company own some 25 claims in the camp, of which only two, the 
Nickel Plate and the Sunnyside, are being worked at present. The ores from these claims are 
treated by the Daly Reduction Company in a 40-stamp mill and cyanide plant in the valley 
below. The capacity of this mill is about 3,500 tons per month. The mine and mill are run 
by water-power obtained from a flume three miles long. The company owns an electric tram 
line about a mile and a half long to carry the ore from the mine to the tipple, and a gravity 
tram line of 9,500 feet in length and 3,500 feet vertical height, which carries the ore in 
five-ton skips to the mill. 

The Nickel Plate and the Sunnyside are the most important claims in the camp, and up 
to the close of 1906, or in less than three years, have turned out, over 77,000 tons of ore. 
The Nickel Plate ore body lies in altered sedimentary rocks, which dip about 16 degrees to 
the west. Interbedded with these or cutting them at an angle are intrusive sheets of ancle- 



8 Ed. 7 Boundary District. L 127 



site. A vertical quartz porphyry and a black dike cut all these strata. The ore body now 
being worked lies on the upper side of a large andesite intrusion, which dips 40 degrees to the 
west and cuts the sediments at a sharp angle. The andesite acts as the footwall, and the ore 
body lies in the sedimentary rock in the zone of contact metamorphism due to the andesite 
intrusion. The metamorphosed rock consists of garnet, epidote and calcite carrying much 
arsenopyrite. The richest ore lies on the footwall and gradually fades out on the upper side 
into low grade rock. The greatest width of the pay ore is about SO feet. The ore body is 
bounded on two sides by dikes and on the third side by a zone of fracturing running across the 
hill. Both arsenopyrite and pyrrhotite occur, but the gold is always associated with the 
former mineral and the greater the mineralisation by arsenopyrite the higher the values 
in gold. 

The Sunnyside claim adjoins the Nickel Plate on the south and the ore body lies in a 
lower stratum. In all four workings the ore body always lies in altered limestone at or near 
the contact of an andesite sheet or dike. Epidote and garnet are not so abundant as in the 
Nickel Plate, but there is more calcite, quartz and pyroxene, all of which are more highly 
developed. The rock is very porous and has been much fissured, the fissures being now filled 
with calcite. Specularite is found in most of the Sunnyside workings, particularly on the 
footwalls. 

In each of these claims the andesite sheets play an important part, and with other cross- 
cutting dikes have been the cause of confining the high values to certain restricted areas. 
Whether these igneous rocks are responsible for the introduction of the gold in the first place 
is uncertain, but the later concentration required the peculiar physical conditions that are 
now found in each of these claims. And in the search for other ore bodies in this camp, the 
apparently accidental conjunction of dikes and of dipping strata such as are here found should 
be borne in mind. 

The Kingston group of mineral claims consists of the Warhorse, Kingston, Metropolitan 
and the Kingston Fraction, all lying on the Twenty-mile slope of the hill. The Warhorse 
ore body lies on a contact of massive blue limestone with an andesite sheet, and not far from 
the central core of monzonite. The limestone dips 30 degrees to the west, and carries irregular 
masses of cherty rock. It is cut by irregular dikes of andesite, which alter the limestone to 
an epidote-garnet-calcite rock. This constitutes the gangue of the ores, and the ore minerals 
are pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite and galena. These are scattered through the gangue 
in varying proportions, pyrrhotite forming with chalcopyrite the largest percentage. The chief 
values are in copper, but this is supplemented by some gold and silver. 

On the Kingston claim farther down the hill the workings are in the sediments within a 
few feet of the edge of the monzonite core. Injections from the monzonite have penetrated 
the bedding planes of the sediments, altering and mineralising them as in the case of the 
Nickel Plate mine. The chief values are in gold, which is associated with arsenopyrite. Some 
later dikes cut both the sediments and igneous rocks, forming favourable localities for the 
concentration of the gold by circulating waters. The Kingston group of claims is very 
favourably situated for the 6ccurrence of ore bodies, and more extensive development may 
prove their existence. 

It was possible to examine only a few of the many claims in the camp, and only those on 
which some development work had been done. A group in the northern part of the sheet, 
owned by T. Bradshaw and others, gives promise of containing some valuable bodies of ore. 
Besides this there are many other claims, which with cheaper transportation and better 
facilities will be worked to advantage. 



L 12S Report of the Minister of- Mines. 1908 



VERNON DISTRICT. 



VERNON MINING DIVISION. 
Report of L. Norris, Gold Commissioner. 

I beg to submit the following report on the mining industry in this Division during the 
year 1907 : — 

Considerable work has been done on what is known locally as Zion mountain, situated 
between the north and south forks of Short creek, which empties into Okanagan lake on the 
west, about 12 miles south of Okanagan landing. There are four mineral claims owned by 
Mr. E. H. Love, an old prospector, the No. 1, J\ T o. 2, No. 3 and No. 4- The No. 1 was staked 
as the Homestake by Mr. Love in 1903. These claims lie about seven miles up the creek. At 
this point the distance between the two forks is about three miles, and the hill (Mount Zion) 
rises to a height of between 1,200 and 1,500 feet above the bed of the north fork. The 
tunnel starts on the To. 1, about 10 feet above the creek-bed, and runs south for 90 feet; it 
then turns and runs due east for 75 feet, exposing on the face a 15-inch ledge at 80 feet below 
the surface. The ledge is free milling quartz but does not run very high, from $2 to $5 per 
ton. Although nothing worth while has yet been struck, the indications of the rock through 
which Mr. Love has driven his 165-foot tunnel has inspired him with unbounded faith in the 
ground he is prospecting. A good pack-trail in from the lake shore is the only means of 
transportation. 

At the mouth of the tunnel Mr. Love has also staked a placer claim in the gravels of the 
creek bed. Here a 1,300 foot tunnel is needed to drain bedrock. The sinking of a 40-foot 
shaft, when he was driven out by water, and the construction of 150 feet of the above- 
mentioned tunnel, constitutes the development work accomplished by Mr. Love to date. 

Three claims, viz., the Rossland, Mascot and Evening Star (which with the Morgan 
constituted the McPhail group), on Monashee mountain, were sold by the owners, Messrs. A> 
A. McPhail and S. J. McCorkell, last fall, to the Fire Valley Gold Mining Co., a company 
incorporated expressly for the purpose of developing these claims. The transfer was not 
made until November, and owing to the lateness of the season work was deferred, but the 
company intend to commence operations in the early spring. 

A group of three claims, the Fifty Cents, Prince Albert and Dipper, has been attracting 
some attention among mining men during the past six months. These claims lie on the west 
bank of the north fork of Mission creek, about five miles up from its junction with the main 
stream and about 20 miles east from Kelowna. The north fork at this point runs about S. 
W. and the claims lie on the face of a steep, rocky terraced hillside, covered with loose rocks 
and bunch-grass and but little timber. The ore-body is large, but irregular and with ill- 
defined walls. The Fifty Cents claim was recorded by Mr. H. B. Mills in May, 1902, and he 
and Mr. A. E. Bishop, of Vernon, now own the group. There is a good waggon road for eight 
miles out of Kelowna and the balance of the way a very good pack-trail. 

The aggregate amount spent in development work every year, even in this district, where 
mining operations are not carried on very extensively, is very great, and, while it might be 
difficult of accomplishment, much good would result if some means were devised whereby the 
average prospector might be advised or instructed as to the best method of developing his 
property. Too often the work done as assessment work is practically thrown away. A shaft 
is sunk sometimes when the same expenditure, if made in clearing off the underbrush and 




ENTRANCE No. 1 MINE, NICOLA COAL & COKE CO. 




7TBu*eau ot Mines. _" 

ENTRANCE No. 2 MINE, NICOLA COAL & COKE CO. 



8 Ed. 7 Vernon District. L 129 



stripping the surface, would show up the claim to much better advantage. The farmer, thanks 
to the Farmers' Institutes and the Department of Agriculture, has expert advice ready to 
hand on every conceivable subject connected with his business, while the prospector, confronted 
with infinitely more difficult problems, has no such assistance. It is true that a very close 
comparison cannot be drawn between the two industries. But were a mining engineer, a 
practical man and a man of some standing in the Province (and there are a number of them), 
to visit the different camps as a totally disinterested person, acting under the direction of the 
Department of Mines, and to advise the prospectors in a friendly way as to the best way to 
set to work to develop their claims, he would be very welcome to the prospectors, listened to 
with respect and attention and, I believe, his advice in the majority of cases would be 
followed. The result would be that less money would be spent under conditions which 
preclude any reasonable chance of success, and the annual assessment work on the different 
claims would enhance their value to a much greater degree than is now the case. 

Mr. W. E. Winkler, of Penticton, and associates hold four coal prospecting licences on 
Powers creek, which empties into Okanagan lake on the west side, at Gellatley. These 
licences cover a tract two miles square, the eastern boundary of which comes within half a 
mile of the lake shore. On the 20th December last they commenced boring with a steam, 
driven diamond-drill and reached a depth of 451 feet on the 16th January last, under the 
superintendence of Mr. A. E. Thomas. The hole was started near the creek bed, at an 
elevation of about 500 feet above the lake and about two miles from the shore. The core 
taken out shows the drill to have gone through successively (as nearly as could be ascertained) 
from the surface in descending series — 
25 feet fine sandstone ; 



5 i 


i clay, with streaks of coal ; 


19 - 


conglomerate, with streaks of coal ; 


6 , 


i gray sandstone ; 


i i 


i lava ; 


7 i 


i sandstone ; 


31 , 


i gray sandstone ; 


100 , 


i sandstone and conglomerate, with traces of coal ; 


5 i 


' day .; 


25 , 


i conglomerate ; 


5 i 


i clay, with small seam coal ; 


o , 


i coal : 


205 , 


i sandstone aud conglomerate ; 


8 


t shale ; 


1 ■ 


i conglomerate still in bottom. 



451 „ 

At 253 feet artesian water was struck which smells strongly of petroleum. In the bank 
near the scene of the drilling operations two seams of coal, of about one foot thickness each, 
are exposed. These two seams are divided by a parallel seam of two feet of clay. Samples 
taken from these seams (on the surface) gave, on analyses, fixed carbon 55.39 and ash 9.10, 
yielding a fairly good though somewhat friable coke. The company has funds on hand and 
intends to have its property examined by a competent man, and, if the report is favourable, 
resume operations in the spring. 

Ofeice Statistics, Vernon Mixing Division. 

Free miners' certificates issued 109 

Claims recorded 24 

Certificates of work recorded 16 

Transfers recorded 5 

Crown-granted claims on tax roll , 28 



L 130 Keport of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



YALE DISTRICT. 



Report of G. C. Tunstall, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to enclose the mining reports for the Kamloops, Ashcroft, Yale, Nicola 
and Similkameen Mining Divisions, embracing operations during the past year in those 
Divisions. In the Kamloops Division there have been few changes worth mentioning since the 
date of my last report. Not much prospecting has been done in consequence of the slump in 
copper. A few of the claims on Coal Hill are being worked by the owners, whilst in the 
majority of instances the labour has not exceeded the limit of assessment work. There is 
every reason to believe that a smelter, of considerable capacity, will be erected in the near 
future, in the vicinity of the line of railway. With that object in view, mine owners have 
been consulted in regard to the quantity of ore that would be available for treatment from 
their respective claims, and the information obtained has been deemed satisfactory. 

The coal-boring operations, six miles west of the town, attained a depth of over 300 feet 
when a stratum of soft shale was struck, which made progress so slow that work was 
temporarily suspended, to allow of prospecting being performed with the drill at the shaft 
near the old Guerin property. I have since heard the operations in that vicinity have not 
proved successful in finding a seam of sufficient thickness as to prove of commercial value, 
and it is probable the drill will be removed to its former position. 

Placer mining in the Yale Division is an event of the past. I regret to state that the 
operations of the Yale Dredging Syndicate, below Yale, have been a failure, and the 
proprietors are making arrangements for the disposal of their dredge, which was of the New 
Zealand type, and operated by men of experience in that country. It is, however, generally 
conceded that the completion of the V, V. & E. railway will bring into mining activity valu- 
able mineral properties on the southern slope of the Hope mountain. 

The Highland Valley mines in the Ashcroft Division are fulfilling the most favourable 
expectations of the parties interested in them. A large outlay has been expended in develop- 
ment work that has been amply justified by the results. 

The coal companies in the Nicola Division are energetically prosecuting the development 
of their respective properties for a larger output, for which there will be an unlimited demand 
for the various purposes for which it is used. The recent discovery of a seam seven to eight 
feet thick on the Hamilton Hill, adjacent to Nicola, has produced much excitement, and a 
company has been formed, provided with the necessary capital to develop the property, and 
work will be shortly begun with a suitable force of men. 

In the Similkameen mining is still handicapped by the lack of railway transportation, which 
is indispensable for the development of its resources. It is expected that the V. V. & E. railway 
will reach Princeton this fall, and stimulate activity in the mining locations of the district. 

A seam of coal, from eight to nine feet thick, was discovered last year in the left bank 
of Granite creek, abont four miles from the old town. The coke obtained from this seam is 
pronounced to be of good quality. On the right bank of the Tulameen river, a short distance 
from the Tulameen townsite, there has been lately uncovered a deposit of coal, over seven feet 
thick. The foreman in charge of the work has received orders to employ sixteen men and 
proceed to run a tunnel. 



8 Ed. 7 Yale District. L 131 



KAMLOOPS MINING DIVISION. 

Development work has been prosecuted on the undermentioned claims during the past 

year : — 

The Orphan Boy group embraces four full-sized claims, viz : the Orphan 
Orphan Boy. Boy, Last Chance, Black Hawk and Copper Cliff. Most of the work has been 
performed on the Orphan Boy, consisting of a shaft 40 feet deep and a 
cross-cut at the bottom exposing a body of ore situated between well-defined walls, assaying 
well in copper, gold and silver. This ledge has been traced on the surface by open cuts for 
a distance of 2,000 feet. The trend of the vein is north-east and south-west. There is a 
considerable quantity of 5 per cent, ore on the dump. 

The Lome group is in the Jocko lake section of Coal hill, about six miles 
Lome. south of Kamloops. A large extent of surface work has been accomplished 

on the vein. A shaft has been sunk to the 50-foot level, showing up a 
quantity of copper ore. The ledge is heavily iron-capped, and the work has demonstrated that 
the iron has been substituted by the copper ore. There are about 100 tons of high-grade ore 
on the dump, including solid sulphides of copper. The ore body, 100 feet in width, is clearly 
exposed on the surface a distance of 1,500 feet. 

The Wheal Tamar group, also in the Jocko lake district, has been 
Wheal Tamar. worked the past season by a small force of men under the charge of O. S. 
Batchelor, who is one of the owners. A well-timbered shaft has been sunk 
in the old glory-hole. At the bottom a cross-cut exposed 50 feet of ore that would prove 
profitable with suitable reduction works. A drainage tunnel was lately started that will 
intersect the vein at a depth of 160 feet from the surface. A drift run 40 feet each way from 
the bottom of an old shaft, 120 feet north of present works, also exhibited a large extent of 
good ore. These works will be connected with the new tunnel, when a large quantity of ore 
will be mined. 

Cotton Belt Mines. 

The Cotton Belt mines are located on Grace mountain at an altitude of 6,350 feet above 
sea level, about 10 miles north-east of Seymour Landing and 40 miles by water from Sicamous. 
Three distinct veins, running parallel to each other, are found in the mineral belt which is 
being prospected. The first one discovered is a galena ledge from 4 to 20 feet wide, yielding 
assays as high as $70 per ton, principal^ in silver. The second vein was discovered by a Mr. 
Sinclair. The vein matter contains gold-copper ore, which has returned assays of 5 per cent, 
copper and 812 in gold to the ton. A shaft 20 feet deep has been sunk and the ledge ascer- 
tained to be 50 feet wide. The third vein lies about 2,000 feet to the east of the one 
previously mentioned, and is 10 feet wide, 3 feet of which carries galena, grey copper and 
chalcopyrite. Being a late discovery, it has not been tested as to value. The mineral 
deposits exist in a schist formation, and can generally be classed of a shipping character. A 
suitable road is very much needed for the transportation of supplies, and a bridge across the 
Seymour river is considered indispensable, as it cannot be forded except at a favourable stage 
of water. It is reported extensive water-power is available for utilization. 

One hundred feet of stripping has been done on the Victoria and 
Cotton Belt Group. Harrison claims, showing up a ledge 7 feet 6 inches in width. On the 
Cotton Belt two men have been engaged surveying a tunnel, of which 55 
feet have been completed, with 6 feet of ore in the face, which improved in extent and value 
as the work progressed. A number of excavations have been made on these properties, 
which, whilst affording evidence of the extent of ore bodies, has not proved conducive to 
development. It is the intention to concentrate the work hereafter in one locality and 
determine more fully the favourable character of existing conditions. 



L 132 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1908 



Office Statistics — Kamloops Mixing Division. 

Claims recorded 120 

Certificates of work 150 

Bills of sale 27 

Free miners' certificates 204 



Xote by Provincial Mineralogist. 

A certain amount of prospecting has been done to the north of Seymour arm of Shuswap 
lake, with indications of success. The following description of a couple of groups of claims on 
headwaters of Seymour River and adjacent to old Big Bend trail, together with a sketch 
map, have been kindly contributed by Mr. William Thomlinson, of Xew Denver, B. C, who 
visited the district last fall : — 

"From Sicamous, on C. P. B. main line, to head of Seymour arm of Shuswap lake, 
36 miles by water. Small steamboats running from Kamloops and Sicamous to mouth of 
Celesta creek, five miles from Seymour. Bow-boats can be hired at Sicamous. 

"McConnell and Bass, trappers, live in cabin at Seymour landing. Address Albert 
Bass, P. O., Sicamous, B. C, if a good guide required ; or address, Hugh Sinclair, Ducks, B. C. 

" Note sketch regarding positions of cabins, lean-to shed, etc., available along route. 

" From McConnell's cabin, at Seymour, to the old crossing of the Big Bend trail, about 
13 miles up the Seymour river, the trail is in fair condition for pack animals, but from this 
point onward the trails are bad and obstructed by fallen timber and rocks. The trail from 
Tepee up Cotton creek is not completed to the open plateau ; therefore, if horses are taken, use 
the old trail, reaching the plateau in a north-easterly direction [see sketch.) Horses will have 
to swim or wade the Seymour river somewhere near the old crossing of the Big Bend trail. 

" Parties from Vernon interested in the Cotton Belt group of claims have erected a cable 
and cage crossing about a mile higher up the river. Some distance above the cable crossing 
there is a log jam, where persons can cross the river near mouth of Cotton creek. There is a 
small lean-to shed near the log jam, north side, but the ' tepee ' shown on the sketch is about 
one-half mile up Cotton creek. 




8 Ed. 7 Yale District. L 133 



"If horses can be got across the river and the plateau reached by the old trail, saddle 
animals can be used to the west end of the Cotton Belt group, but not beyond, as there is 
practically no trail to the Copper King or Camp AfcLeod groups, which are situate along a 
very steep and broken slope. 

"The Cotton Belt group consists of about 16 claims, located along an almost continuous 
vein outcrop, about 80 feet from and parallel to a large 'dyke' of crystalline limestone or 
coarse marble. The vein is on the north-east side, footwall side, of the lime dyke, in a schistose 
eruptive rock, and dips, same as the dyke, to the south-west. Minerals noted on or near 
outcrop of vein, surface workings and dumps : galena, zincblende, iron pyrites, oxides of iron, 
garnet rock vein quartz, etc. Values said to be low ; ore much mixed. 

" Some distance from and on the upper side of the lime dyke above referred to there is a 
belt of what appears to be a hard lime agglomerate of a brown colour ; this and the parallel 
lime dyke were the only rocks, not distinctly of eruptive origin, seen for miles ; therefore, it is 
an interesting geological problem to solve their true nature and occurrence where found 
enclosed for miles in igneous or eruptive rocks. 

"The Copper King group of claims is located along the outcrop of vein of the shear zone 
fissure type, both walls being alike gneissic and schistose igneous rock, probably an altered 
hornblende granite. The vein filling, where exposed on the Copper King claim, is quartz 
showing copper-bearing minerals, mainly chalcopyrite. Samples taken by myself gave from 
2.2 to 21.8 % of copper, and the paystreak, 2 to 6 feet wide where now exposed, will average, 
I think, 5 % Cu. and 50c. Au. per ton (2,000 fi»s.) of ore. 

" The claims of the Camp McLeod group are located on a vein parallel to the vein showing 
on the Copper King group, but do not show any copper-bearing minerals to speak of. This 
vein on the Camp McLeod claim has an outcrop over 8 feet wide, and the minerals noted were 
galena, zinc blende, magnetite, sulphide of iron, quartz, calcite, etc., intimately mixed together, 
No mineral of value found yet, but values may improve with depth, or the ore may become 
more dehned and less mixed below the outcrop. 

" The natural route to the Copper King and Camp McLeod groups of claims is via the 
north fork of Seymour river, as shown on the attached sketch map, and I think that the 
Cotton Belt group is also more accessible by the same route, as the grade cannot be more than 
about 4 % from Seymour landing and does not cross any high divides or plateaus. 

" I cannot at present say that any of the mineral properties referred to will make mines, 
but I do deem some of them worthy of substantial development, especially the Copper King 
group ; therefore think that a good trail ought to be built up the north fork of Seymour river, 
as such a trail would enable the owners of the said mineral claims to develop or bond their 
properties, and besides open up a section of country rich in timber and agricultural lands." 



ASHCROFT MINING DIVISION. 

Report of H. P. Christie, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit my annual mining report for the Ashcroft Mining Division 
for the year 1907. 

The situation generally remains unchanged since last year, the office statistics, as you 
will see, being practically the same as 1906. The owners of claims continue to have complete 
confidence and do the necessary amount of assessment work to keep them existing, but there 
has been no actual mining to speak of. 



L 134 Report of the Minister op Mines. 1908 



Office Statistics — Ashcroft Mixing Division*. 

Free miners' certificates issued 114 

Certificates of work recorded 46 

Locations recorded 48 

Conveyances n 11 



ASHCROFT MIXING DIVISION. 

Notes by the Provincial Mineralogist. 

The Maggie mineral claim is situated on the west side of the main 
Maggie. Cariboo waggon road, about 14 miles from Ashcroft, and is owned by 

Messrs. Hocking, Smith and Bryson. During the summer of 1907 the 
property was held under bond by Messrs. Rombauer and Adams, who did considerable 
development work under-ground, employing 10 men for the greater part of the season. The 
formation is a light coloured magnesium rock in which the lead being developed is a crushed 
zone following a fault plane, having a general east and west strike and a dip of about 70° 
to the south. The mineralisation consists of copper pyrites in lenses of quartz occurring at 
irregular intervals in the crushed zone. 

During the course of development the lessees shipped some 45 to 50 tons of higher 
grade selected ore to the Ladysmith smelter, which yielded about eight per cent, copper and 
two ounces of silver to the ton, with no return for gold. The freight from the mine to 
Ashcroft was three dollars a ton, while a freight (from Ashcroft) and treatment rate of 
five dollars a ton was charged by the smelter. These charges rendered it necessary to ship 
only the higher grade ores, so that from the shipping ore there had been sorted out from 100 
to 125 tons of second class ore, which was estimated to run about half the value of the first 
class ; this second class ore will not stand the treatment charges necessary at present. 

The underground workings consist of a shaft, started on the top of a small knoll about 
100 feet higher than the waggon road and than the Bonaparte river, and sunk about 265 feet. 
At the level of the waggon road an adit tunnel has been driven in for about 600 feet, from 
which, at 150 feet in, a cross-cut 35 feet long has been driven to the north to meet the shaft, 
while farther in, another cross-cut has been made to the north for 60 feet, meeting the lead 
at that distance. At a depth of 185 feet in the shaft, or 85 feet below the adit level, is the 
No. 2 level, connected with the shaft by a cross-cut, and with the No. 1, or adit level, by a 
winze. On this level a drift has been run to the east for 75 feet, with cross-cuts at the end 
amounting to 55 feet ; and to the west a drift has been extended for about 120 feet, and a stope, 
70 feet long, had been raised some 30 feet above the level, from which ore was being taken. 

No. 3 level is at a depth of 165 feet below the No. 1 or adit level, and is also connected 
with the shaft by a cross-cut tunnel. On this level some 175 feet of drifting and cross-cutting 
i- said to have been done by previous lessees, but as it was insufficiently timbered, the workings 
had caved and were, in July, 1907, being cleared out and re-timbered, about 100 feet of the 
level having been so recovered. 

On the hills forming the north bank of the Thompson river, some few 

Gypsum at miles west of Ashcroft and opposite the railway station of Spatsum, four 

Spatsum. mineral claims have been staked by Messrs. Sinclair and Spencer, covering a 

deposit of gypsum. These claims, located as the Hart, Flora, Marie and Belle, 

were surveyed during the spring of 1907 and are in the " Railway Belt." The claims are located 

about one-third of a mile from the Thompson river, and are about 600 feet higher than the river 



8 Ed. 7 Yale District. L 13-: 



bed. Very little work has as yet been done on the properties, and as much disintegration of 
the soft rock formation has taken place, it was impossible to determine, with any degree of 
accuracy, the extent of the deposit; but, so far as could be determined, there is a bed of fairly 
pure gypsum about 40 feet thick, having an apparent strike of N. 30° E. and a dip of 30° to 
the N. W. The under and overlaying beds are shale, so disintegrated on the surface that their 
juncture with the gypsum beds is very indistinct. It appears that some ten years ago the 
property had been staked by a prospector named Munroe, who drove a tunnel into the deposit 
about 25 feet, at the end of which a small winze was sunk. These workings, although small, 
are in very solid and pure gypsum, and from here samples were taken for analysis, upon which 
the Provincial Assayer reports as follows : — Gypsum (CaS0 4 + 2 Aq) = 99.8 % ; silica = trace ; 
alumina = trace ; iron = nil; magnesia = trace. 

The deposit may be said to have a length of at least 2,000 feet, with, as already stated, a 
thickness of over 40 feet. The layers comprising the bed are of varying hardness and purity, 
but, there appears to be no doubt that, the deposit is capable of providing a large tonnage of 
very pure mineral. The property is so situated that the mineral could be delivered by aerial 
tramway directly to the C. P. Ry. tracks at Spatsum, on the opposite side of the river. 

Highland Valley. 

Highland valley is the name, locall} 1 - given, to a section of country which lies about 27 miles 
to the south-east of Ashcroft, on the waggon road from that place to the Nicola valley. The 
so-called valley is in reality the height of land between Pukaist creek flowing west into the 
Thompson river, Three-Mile creek flowing north into Kamloops lake, and Guichon creek, which 
flows south into the Nicola river. The camp here formed is, consequently, partly in the 
Ashcroft and partly in the Kamloops Mining Divisions, but as the camp is more easily reached 
from Ashcroft, and most of the parties interested reside there, it has become associated with 
the former Division. 

The best known group in Highland valley camp is the Transvaal 
Transvaal. group, since that property, while under bond to the Trail smelter, was 

quite extensively developed. The group consists of six claims, the Trans- 
vaal, Imperial, Chamberlain, Ladysmith, Pretoria and Mafeking mineral claims., and is owned 
by William Knight, J. Hoskings and George Novak. The shaft, in July, 1907, was found to 
be filled with water to within 25 feet of the collar, so that none of the underground workings 
could be inspected, but they are evidently extensive, to judge from the size of the dump. The 
shaft has two compartments, and is reported to have been sunk 200 feet, with, at the 100-foot 
level, a drift to the west of 160 feet in length, and another to the east, of 180 feet, and from 
the latter a 40-foot cross-cut was driven. At the 200-foot level a drift was made to the east 
for about 75 feet. The shaft is surmounted by a shaft-house, in which a hoisting engine had 
been installed, which has since been removed. A few feet to the north-east from the shaft are 
some large open pits, in which were to be seen a certain amount of blue carbonate of copper, 
occurring as irregular patches in a black amygdaloidal trap dyke. The mineral, as shown in 
these, cuts is not present in sufficient quantity to constitute an ore, although appearing greater 
than it really is, owing to the contrast of the blue carbonate against the black enclosing rock. 
The underground workings mentioned had been undertaken to prove this surface-showing at 
a depth, and, judging from the character of the dump and the fact that no ore had been shipped, 
no ore-body of importance was encountered in the workings. 

Some 1,500 feet from the shaft to the nor-th-east there is a tunnel about 200 feet long, 
evidently driven to prove up a surface-showing of copper in a similar trap-rock, but, as far as 
could be seen, no sufficient amount of ore was met with in the tunnel. 



L 136 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1808 



The Ajax mineral claim adjoins the Transvaal on the east and is owned by Knight and 
Hosking. There is a showing of similar black trap-rock showing sulphides of copper. Two 
tunnels, 20 and 25 feet respectively, have been started to develop the property at a depth, but 
had not, as yet, been driven into the solid formation. 

The Highland group, consisting of seven claims, viz.: the Highlander, 
Highland. Standard, Glenora, Glenora Fraction, Nickel Plate and Virginia mineral 

claims, is owned by George Novak and J. S. C. Fraser, of Rossland. This 
group adjoins the Transvaal group on the south and at a slightly lower elevation. Near the 
centre of the group there is a tunnel which has been driven in 115 feet, from which two cross- 
cuts have been driven to the left for a distance of 15 feet. At this point the showing consists 
of a black trap-rock, similar to that noted in the Transvaal, with small quantities of copper 
pyrites scattered through it. Some distance away a timbered shaft was found which had been 
sunk about 25 feet deep, but, as it was filled with water, it could not be examined. There 
was no particular showing visible on the surface, but, to judge from the dump, mineral had 
been encountered in the shaft, as a considerable quantity of black trap-rock had been taken 
out, appreciably impregnated with copper pyrites. A sample, taken from the dump, of what 
might be considered the ore, gave, upon assay, 4 % copper. 

The Keystone group lies to the east of the Transvaal, on Forge moun- 
Keystone. tain, at the headwaters of Guichon creek, the workings thereon being about 

a mile from those of the Transvaal. The group consists of six claims — the 
Keystone Fraction, Douglas Pine, Snowden, St. Boniface, Waverley and Mafeking Fraction — 
and is owned by George Novak, Al. Johnson. J. S. C. Fraser and John Cowans. Very little 
work has been done on these claims, only a small tunnel some 15 feet long having been driven, 
chiefly through slide rock, but reaching the solid formation. No amount of ore was visible in 
the rock-in-place in the tunnel, but in the slide rock, removed in making the tunnel, a con- 
siderable amount of fine copper carbonate — azurite — had been found. 

The country rock is here overlain by heavy beds of basalt, lava and tuff, which seem to 
cap the higher hills, and, along the line of juncture of these and the underlying rocks, the 
copper carbonates are found. As yet, no particular amount of ore has been uncovered, but 
the amount of copper visible in the slide rock gives encouragement for further prospecting. 

The Albatross group of three claims lies some distance to the south- 
Albatross, east of the Transvaal, at an elevation of 5,500 feet, and is owned by Messrs. 
Hosking, Knight, et -al. No one was present on the property when visited 
and the various showings had to be found by following foot-trails from the camping ground, a 
method anything but satisfactory. The No. 1 stake of the Albatross was found, the country 
rock in the vicinity being a dark basalt, but no showing of mineral was seen. The Albatross 
tunnel was found to be barricaded and locked, and judging from the size of the dump, would 
be about 30 feet long, in a volcanic breccia, with fragments of granite, carrying some copper 
pyrites and specular iron. 

The Tamarack group, consisting of the Tamarack, Shamrock, King, 
Tamarack. Duke, Billy, Muir Fraction, May L. and Star mineral claims, is situated 

at an altitude of 5,200 feet, about one and a half miles to the north-west 
of the waggon road at Fish lakes, and is owned by Dr. Sanson and others, of Ashcroft, who 
have built a branch road up to the property and erected a very good cabin. The development 
consists of three or four shafts, each sunk about 25 feet deep, and a number of open cuts. 
These workings show that there are on the property a considerable number of parallel quartz 
veins, having a general north-east strike, most of which carry more or less copper pyrites or 



8 Ed. 7 Yale District. L 137 



bornite. These quartz veins vary considerably in width, but the work done does not prove 
their continuity. The vein at the No. 2 shaft is 4 to 4| feet wide at the shaft, but no drifts 
or other workings have been made along its strike. The mineral occurs in bunches of vary- 
ing size in the quartz vein matter, and the selected ore assayed high in copper. 

The Storm, group, consisting of the Rainstorm, Snotvstorm, Hailstorm, 
Storm. &<;., mineral claims, is situated at an elevation of 5,100 feet on the top 

of the ridge, and about a mile to the south of the Ashcroft-Nicola waggon 
road, opposite the 29-mile post from Ashcrof t. The properties are owned by Stuart Henderson 
and Gilbert Couverette, of Ashcroft. In July, 1907, development had not progressed very 
far ; such work as had been clone was for the purpose of prospecting the properties generally. 
The country formation is a dark, porphyritic, volcanic rock, through which are darker horn- 
blendic seams, usually ironstained on the surface ; along the line of these seams a movement 
seems to have taken place and a considerable amount of gouge matter formed, a soft kaolin 
material, in which is found a considerable percentage of copper sulphides and carbonates- 

The No. 1 cut is about 50 feet long and 8 feet deep at the face, and has been run along- 
side one of these seams. A gouge material some nine inches thick, exposed for a portion of 
the length of the cut, was sampled and gave, copper, 21 % ; silver, 5.4 oz. to the ton, and a 
trace of gold. 

About 200 feet from the No. 1 cut is another cut, 45 feet long and 6 feet deep at the face, 
which cross-cuts a similar seam 6 inches wide, which was also sampled and gave practically a 
similar assay. 

There are a number of other small openings and exposures showing copper ore, existing 
under similar conditions, which give encouragement for further prospecting and development. 

The Ball group adjoins the Storm group and is held by the same owners. 
Ball. The group consists of the Handball, Football, Baseball, Cricketball, Small- 

ball, etc., mineral claims, and is as yet in the "prospect stage" of develop- 
ment. On the Handball a shaft had been sunk for 6 feet, showing a seam of about 15 inches, 
which assayed in copper. An open cut 20 feet long was seen, but it had not cut solid forma- 
tion. No. 1 shaft, which was sunk in 1905, was down 12 feet and exposed two seams, each 
12 inches thick, separated by a portion of barren and very much broken and decomposed 
ledge matter. These seams assayed 5 % copper, with traces of gold and silver only. About 
250 feet to the south from the No. 1 shaft is the remains of an old shaft, said to have been 
sunk in 1897, Jto a depth of 80 feet; nothing could be seen of the shaft, but the dump 
contained numerous samples of copper pyrites. This old shaft is on the Football, which claim 
was formerly staked and worked under the name of the Last Chance mineral claim, and no new 
work has been done since the last 'staking. 

On the Baseball, three open cuts were seen near the trail, which showed seams running 
north and south carrying specular iron. The Cricketball adjoins the Baseball on the south 
and on it a number of small open cuts have been made, which did not develop any mineral of 
importance. 

On the Smallball an open cut, 7 feet long and 5 feet deep at the face, showed copper- 
stained crouge matter along a seam. 



L 138 Report of the Minister of Mixes. 1908 

NICOLA MINING DIVISION. 
Note by the Provincial Mineralogist. 

From Highland valley the waggon road was followed down to the Nicola valley at 
Coutlee, about five miles west of the town of Nicola. 

The Peacock group, consisting of three Crown-granted claims, the 

Peacock. Boulder Cap, Peacock and Banner, and owned by Thomas Hunter, of 

Nicola, is situated on Clapperton creek, about six miles up from Nicola. The 
showings upon which the properties were staked occur in the creek bed, having been exposed 
by the washing of the waters of the creek. The country rock, a volcanic rock, granitic in 
character, has been faulted, and a crushed zone follows this fault-plane, along which the creek 
has worked its way. There is a rather indistinct quartz vein following the course of the 
creek — connecting several large "blows-out" of quartz which occur in the granite and have 
been laid bare by the creek. The vein along its edges carries more or less copper sulphides 
and carbonates, but the mineralisation did not appear to enter the larger quartz bodies ; one 
of these quartz bodies exposed is 100 feet long by 36 feet wide. The hills rise abruptly on 
either side of the creek, and such development as has been done is confined to the narrow 
gorge of the creek. On the Peacock a shaft had been sunk about 50 feet and a drift set-oft for 
20 feet to the north, with the intention of cutting, at a depth, a large body of quartz 
exposed in the bed of the creek. These workings appear to have cut several small stringers 
of quartz, but not to have reached the main body, although it is reported that the face of the 
drift was showing an increasing amount of mineralisation. 

On the opposite side of the creek from this main shaft, and 100 feet farther up stream^ 
there is a smaller shaft sunk about 10 feet on a fissure in the country rock, in which were to 
be seen a number of narrow quartz veins, mineralised with copper pyrites. 

Still a little farther up the creek bed is the pump shaft, 4 feet by 6 feet, sunk some 20 
feet on a showing of quartz carrying copper sulphides. A sample taken of selected ore gave, 
upon assay, 4.1 % copper, with small quantities of gold and silver. 

Nicola Coal Field. 
During the year 1907 a new producing coal field was opened up in the Nicola valley, 
where the Nicola Valley Coal ct Coke Co. began shipments of coal from the " Middlesboro 
Colliery," situated a few miles south of the town of Coutlee and on the bank of the Coldwater 
river, while another company, the Diamond Vale Coal & Iron Mines, had, by the end of the 
year, so far progressed towards the producing stage as to be deserving of notice. The whole 
field has been the subject of a report by Dr. R. W. Ells, of the Geological Survey of Canada, 
from which report very extended extracts were copied into the Report of this Bureau for 1905. 
The collieries above mentioned are both in the area designated by Dr. Ells as the " Coal 
Gully " area. 

The Coal Gully coal seam, now included in the area held by the Nicola 
Nicola Valley Valley Coal &, Coke Company, has for many years been mined in a small 
Coal & Coke way to provide local wants. The opening from which this coal was taken 
Company. had been run-in on an outcrop of coal so far up the gully as to be inaccess- 

ible by a railway, consequenth 7 . the company drove in a new tunnel at a 
convenient height above the general level of the valley, and succeeded in striking the coal at 
that level, after driving 20 feet through surface wash. This adit level is now known as the 
No. 1 mine, and had been, in July, only driven into the coal about 50 feet, but, since that 
time, the tunnel has been driven to intersect the old slope from Coal gully at a depth of about 
800 feet on the slope, and various rooms have been set off. The tunnel was driven 8 feet by 
8 feet in the clear, inside of timbers, which were 10 by 12 inches in caps and sills and 10 by 



8 Ed. 7 Yale District. L 139 



10 inches in the posts. This coal seam varies somewhat in thickness and character, but, where 
measured, was as follows : — Conglomerate roof, coal, Sh feet thick ; 2^ feet rock and shale 
parting ; coal, 5 feet thick, with a shale pavement. 

The No. 2 mine is also opened out by an adit tunnel started a sufficient height above the 
valley to give working height for tipples and bins. This tunnel was started on the knoll 
forming the bank of the Coldwater river, about half a mile to the south from the Xo. 1 mine, 
and is supposed to be driven on the second to lowest of the known seams, which seam is here 
about 5 feet 6 inches thick with a 4-inch stone parting. About 200 feet higher up the hill a 
slope has been started-away from the outcrop, and was to follow the dip until it intersected 
the adit level at a point about 500 feet from its mouth. It was the intention to use this slope 
as the return airway when the mine was opened up. The roof and pavement of the seam are 
good and sound, consisting of a fine-grained conglomerate or sandstone, the wash of a disin- 
tegrated granite. 

When the properties were visited in July they were only being developed, and neither of 
the tipples nor the railway had been constructed ; since then, however, the Xos. 1 and 2 mines 
have been fully equipped, as can be seen in the photographs, taken later in the year, which 
accompany this report. Actual underground development had only been attempted on the 
two seams mentioned, but, from prospecting the outcrops, the company believes that it has, at 
least, four workable seams on its properties, viz.: — The Jewel seam, which is the lowest strati- 
graphically, reported to be I8h feet thick ; next to this, in ascending order, is 136 feet of rock ; 
then the Ells seam, 8 feet 9 inches thick, followed by 136 feet of rock ; then the Major seam, 
\~} T feet thick, above which is 89 feet of rock, and then the Gem seam, which is 3 feet thick. 

The company shipped during the short portion of 1907 in which it was in operation, some 
10,868 tons of coal. A spur leaving the C. P. Ry. branch line from Spences Bridge to Nicola, 
at Merritt, between Coutlee and Xicola, has been built to connect with both tipples. 

As indicating the quality of the coal, the following analyses are given, taken from Dr. 
R. W. Ells' report :— 

(a.) From tunnel on lower seam of Coal gully : 

Water * 3.04 % 

Volatile combustible matter 37.18 <\ 

Fixed carbon 52.05 m 

Ash (reddish-white) 7.73 n 

100.00 n 
Coke per cent., 59.78. Yields a compact, firm, coherent coke. 

(b.) From Lot 1,267. One creek running into Quilchena creek : 

Water 6.95 % 

Volatile combustible matter 37.21 n 

Fixed carbon 47.95 n 

Ash (pale reddish-brown) . : 7.89 n 

100.00 n 
Coke per cent., 55.84. Yields a firm, coherent coke. 

(c.) From southerly outcrop of seam on Coldwater river: 

Water 3.17 % 

Volatile combustible matter 35.73 n 

Fixed carbon 55.25 ii 

Ash (light reddish-brown) 5.85 n 

100.00 .. 
Coke per cent., 61.10. Yields a firm, coherent coke. 



L 140 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



(d.) From the Coldwater river, near its junction with the Nicola near Coutlee Lower 
tunnel. C. H. Keefer, Esq. : 

Water , 1.37 % 

Volatile combustible matter 38.24 n 

Fixed carbon 54.25 .1 

Ash (light reddish-brown) 6.14 11 

100 00 ., 
Coke per cent., 60.39. Yields a compact, firm, coherent coke. 
Analyses by fast coking understood. 

The Diamond Vale Coal and Iron Mines, Limited, holds the areas 

Diamond Vale, immediately adjoining, and across the river from, the Middlesboro Colliery. 

The Diamond Vale Company's areas cover a large portion of the level valley between the 

Coldwater and the Nicola rivers, under which there is reason to believe that at least some of 

the coal seams being developed by the Middlesboro Collieries extend. This point has been 

proved to the satisfaction of the holding company by a series of bore-holes, sunk from the flat 

land which borders the river. The solid, or coal-bearing, formation underlying the valley is 

overlain by a heavy covering of gravel wash, carrying a large amount of water, through which 

the company has experienced some difficulty in sinking a shaft, owing to trouble from water. 

No. 1 shaft was started about 475 feet from the bank of the Coldwater, and at this point 

the solid formation was expected to be struck, at a depth of 96 feet. This shaft was started 

8 feet 4 inches by 12 feet 10 inches in the clear, and well timbered, and was sunk about 45 

feet, when it had to be temporarily abandoned, owing to the influx of water, which the 

machinery at command could not handle. The shaft has been equipped with a suitable hoisting 

plant and head gear, pumps, etc., and a sawmill had been erected and equipped. 

After the stoppage of work at the No. 1 shaft, there was an attempt being made in July 
to sink No. 2 shaft, at a point about 10 feet from the edge of the Clearwater river, which 
point was " to the rise of the coal " from the No. 1 shaft. Here the solid formation, which 
outcrops boldly immediately across the river, was expected to be covered by only 19 feet of 
gravel wash. 

In July this shaft had been sunk for 16 feet and, although the inflow of water -was 
considerable, it was expected that no difficulty would be experienced in reaching the solid 
formation and eventually making the shaft water-tight. 

From exploratory work it was indicated that, at the No. 2 shaft, a 40-inch seam of coal 
would be found at a depth of 70 feet from the surface ; this is about 50 feet deep in the solid 
formation, while 150 feet below this it is expected that the " Rat Hole" seam developed by 
the Middlesboro Colliery will be struck. These seams dip at an angle of about 25° towards 
the No. 1 shaft and would, consequently, at that shaft be correspondingly deeper. 

While considerable delay has been experienced in reaching the coal seams, owing to the 
overlying water-bearing strata, it is not felt that the conditions offer any insurmountable 
difficulties, and that, with proper mining equipment, the task can be accomplished. The 
developments in the vicinity would give every indication that important coal seams underlie 
the property and will soon be made productive. 

The only other company doing any development in the Valley was 

B. C. Amalga- the British Columbia Amalgamated Coal Company. This company was 

mated Coal Co. organised in Portland, Oregon, with head office at 506, McKay Building, 

Portland, Oregon, A. B. Crossman, Secy.-Treasurer, and is registered in 

British Columbia as an "Extra-Provincial Company," under date of March 7th, 1907. The 



8 Ed. 7 Yale District. L 141 



company is limited, and its capital stock is $10,000,000, divided into $1 shares. The company 
is reported to hold a large acreage of land up the Coldwater river and some options on Ten-Mile 
creek, but, so far as could be learned, no successful prospecting had taken place on these areas, 
and no work was going on there on August 1st, 1907, when the district was visited. The 
company had, however, secured options on some land adjoining the Indian reservations at 
Lower Nicola. This land, it is understood, consisted of 300 acres owned by Mrs. Woodward 
and 200 acres owned by Mr. Smith, while application had been made for " licence to prospect " 
on 640 acres lying adjoining, to the north. 

On August 1st the company was employing one shift of five men in sinking a diamond 
drill hole, using a Sullivan "H" drill, giving a 1^-inch core; the casing pipe at the surface 
being three inches in diameter. The bore-hole was being sunk on the edge of the Indian 
reserve, and on August 1st was down some 145 feet and was then still in gravel wash, the solid 
formation not having been reached. The log of the drill-hole shows it to have passed through 
clay and boulders, clay, sand, coarse gravel, clay, clay and boulders, clay, clay and boulders, 
and at 143 feet down to have struck what the driller classed as hard-pan. This is the first 
hole the company has sunk, and as yet coal has not been developed on the property. 



NICOLA MINING DIVISION. 

Report of George Murray, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit the annual report on mining operations in the Nicola Mining 
Division for the year 1907 : — 

Progress during the past year has not equalled expectations, yet there has been some 
advance. Prospects were growing brighter until the severe and rapid decline in copper took 
place. Mining engineers who had been exploiting the field were favourably impressed and 
intended to begin development on working bonds ; but the drop in copper values has resulted 
in at least a temporary check. Ore values in this district are chiefly copper. Notwithstanding 
disappointment, the confidence of claim owners is still unshaken. With most of them it has 
been a continual expenditure for eight years or more, without one dollar's return ; yet assessment 
work has been carefully performed and Crown grants have been obtained for a number of 
claims. 

The group of claims owned by Max Ekars and associates gives promise of a large body of 
high-grade ore. Those parties have done a large amount of development work, and were 
preparing to ship several car-loads of ore for smelter treatment when the price of copper fell. 
Tests already made would have justified the venture with a more favourable price ruling for 
the metal. 

Prospecting work on a gold-copper group of claims, situated on Clapperton or Mill creek, 

owned by T. Hunter, has been prosecuted steadily, with favourable results. A cross-cut 

which was run from a shaft 60 feet deep exposed 20 feet of mineralised matter carrying 

copper, with commercial values in gold and silver, and the stronger portion of the lead has not 

been reached. 

Coal Mining. 

In coal mining operations development has been steady, rapid and satisfactory. Exten- 
sive coal seams of excellent quality have been opened up and a valuable industry inaugurated. 

The Nicola Valley Coal and Coke Co. has been singularly successful. Commencing on a 
well-known coal exposure, most of their underground work has been in coal and has demon- 



L 142 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



st rated the presence of several large and valuable seams. The work already done demonstrates 
a large body of Goal to be now available, and this at a depth vhich can be regarded as little 
more than surface. The mine is being thoroughly equipped with every modern appliance for 
effective work. The daily output at the present stage can easily be 300 tons, a capacity 
which can be speedily enlarged when the demand warrants. 

In the same vicinity the Diamond Yale Coal and Iron Company is operating and has 
persisted in prosecuting work, amid unexpected difficulties and expenditure. After 
considerable drill prospecting, a site for a shaft was chosen and extensive preparation 
made to push the work and have a shaft in first class order. Unfortunately, after a heavy 
outlay in sinking, the work had to be abandoned, owing to seepage from the Coldwater river, 
close bv. Another shaft site was selected and success crowned the effort, conditions being 
favourable. Bed-rock was reached at a depth of 50 feet, and at a depth of 65 feet a 5-foot 
seam of coal of excellent quality was disclosed, from which there is now an output. Work is 
being rapidly pushed, so that the production may be increased. Beneath the seam now 
reached the drill has proved two other veins within a depth of 300 feet. The three seams 
give a combined thickness of 15 feet, with greater possibilities, as the large Coal gully seam 
may be discovered. The percentage of carbon in the coal mined is 51.25, and the coking value 
is 59 per cent. 

The surface work, buildings erected and plant installed, are planned on a scale which has 
in view extensive mining operations. 

The B. C. Amalgamated Coal Co. has been operating with the drill on Ten-mile Creek, 
Lower Nicola, since the middle of May. The site chosen proved difficult, owing to great 
depth of wash and numerous boulders. This company has recently secured coal limits 
adjoining the Diamond Vale, on the west and north of the Nicola Valley Coal & Coke Co. 
and on the line of the C. P. R. The drill will operate on the newly acquired land and can 
hardly fail to find coal. 

About 2i miles east of the Diamond Vale shaft the Nicola Coal Company, Ltd., composed 
chiefly of Vancouver men, has a large coal exposure of good quality, on which work on an 
extended scale will be undertaken. 

Slow progress in metalliferous mining is more than compensated by activity in the 
production and search after coal. There is now in evidence sufficient to justify the belief 
that the coal resources of Nicola will draw and sustain a large and prosperous community. 
For years the presence of coal was known, but it was difficult to induce capital to take hold. 

Office Statistics — Nicola Mining Division. 

Certificates of work , 139 

Claims recorded , 76 

Bills of sale 7 

Free miners' certificates issued 91 



8 Ed. 7 Yale District. L 143 



YALE MINING DIVISION. 
Report of "William Dodd, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report and office statistics for the year 
ending 31st December, 1907 : — 

The Yale Dredging Company operated in the bed of the Fraser river at Hill's bar and 
Sawmill riffle in April, September and October, the returns for the half-year ending 31st 
October being $2,000. 

The Mt. Baker and Yale Mining Company has been operating a ten-stamp mill on 
Siwash Creek for the past month. 

Other claims on the same creek — the owners continue to perform their annual assessment 
work. 

In the vicinity of Cocmihalla, Hope, Skagit, and Ladner creeks numerous locations have 
been made during the past season, on which owners have done sufficient work to hold their 
claims. 

The placer mining in this Division for the period is scarcely worthy of mention. 

Office Statistics — Yale Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates issued 57 

ii ii companies 4 

Mineral and placer claims recorded . , 25 

Placer leases issued , 1 

Certificates of work ". 45 

Affidavits and notices filed 34 

Conveyances and assignments 9 

Agreements 2 

Powers of attorney 2 

Rentals, mining leases 5 

Kevemie. 

Free miners' certificates $440 50 

Mining receipts 555 25 

Miscellaneous receipts 5G2 50 

$1,558 25 



L 144 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



SIMILKAMEEN MINING DIVISION. 

Report op Hugh Hunter, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to forward the annual mining report on the Siniilkameen Mining 
Division for the year 1907. — 

On Granite creek three placer mining leases are being developed by Messrs. Lambert and 
Stewart, who did considerable work blasting boulders on the surface of their claims, to enable 
them to ground-sluice in the spring. They also have all the material on the ground to start 
operations as soon as high water is over. 

On the Tulameen river, between Slate and Eagle creeks, seven placer mining leases have 
been taken up, but too late in the season to do any prospecting. 

There has not been much development done on mineral claims, the owners merely satisfying 
themselves with doing sufficient work to hold them. 

On the divide between Slate and Champion creeks a number of claims have been bonded 
to the Colorado Assaying and Refining Company, which is prospecting the ground for platinum. 
As the start was made too late in the season, and owing to the usually heavy snowfall in this 
section, operations were postponed till late in the spring. The results of the work have so far 
not been made public. 

On Bear creek the Similkameen Mining and Smelting Company is developing its property 
and is driving a tunnel to cross-cut the lead. 

On the Independence group, consisting of seven claims and bonded to the Granby Co. in 
1906, continuous work has been carried on, prospecting the ground. 

On Copper mountain the Reco group, consisting of four claims, has been bonded to Spokane 
capitalists. On the Reco a tunnel is being driven to tap the ledge, which shows on the surface 
high-grade gold and copper values. First payment has been made on this bond. 

Office Statistics — Similkameen Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates 200 

ii ii special 3 

Location records 233 

Certificates of work 366 

Conveyances 42 

Certificates of improvement 5 

Placer leases 8 

Revenue. 

Free miners' certificates 81,277 50 

Mining receipts, general 3,338 67 

Acreage tax, mineral claims 1,350 25 



85,966 4 




I 





8 Ed. 7 Lillooet District. L 145 



LILLOOET DISTRICT. 

:o: 

LILLOOET MINING DIVISION. 
Report of C. Phair, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit my annual report on the progress of mining in Lillooet 
Mining Division during the year 1907 : — 

The accompanying statistics show a decrease in several items from former years. 

The only development work done on mineral claims, outside the annual assessment work, 
was upon the following two groups : — 

The Wayside group comprises three claims— Wayside, Helium and 

Wayside. Radium — situate at Bridge river and owned by Mr. Osmond Fergusson. 

No. 2 tunnel, on the Wayside, was extended 14 feet and a shaft sunk 22 

feet, striking a rich body of ore which the owner believes to be permanent. A saw-mill and 

houses were also erected. 

The Summit group is comprised of three claims and owned by Messrs. 

Summit. Babb, Jones and Kinney. It is situate also at Bridge river. The vein can 

be traced about 1,000 feet on the surface, and the ore is galena carrying 

gold and silver values. Assays from the croppings run from $30 to $60 a ton. A tunnel has 

been driven 70 feet, but the main ledge has not yet been struck. It may be of interest to 

know this class of ore has been found in the "free gold belt." 

The Lome Company crushed with an arrastra 309 tons of ore, yielding §3,726. 

Placer Mining. 

Messrs. H. M. Babb and Company worked an average of 12 men The greater part of 
the season was spent in completing the plant and flume. In the autumn they commenced 
piping and the gravel yielded 25 cents per cubic yard. 

No other leases, except Mr. Jesperson's on Cayoosh creek to a small extent, have been 
worked during the year. 

Capitalists from Boston have purchased the dredge at Lillooet, which belonged to the 
Iowa-Lillooet Gold Mining Company, and I am informed it is their intention to operate it the 
coming season and also to build another dredge. Their mining engineer, Mr. Percy Williams, 
of Los Angeles, examined the gravels of the Fraser river, where they intend to operate, before 
the sale was made. 

Office Statistics — Lillooet Mining Division. 

Mineral claims recorded 34 

Placer claims recorded 3 

Certificates of work recorded 76 

Conveyances recorded 13 

Mining leases in force 21 

Dredging leases in force 2 

Free miners' certificates issued • 81 



L 146 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



CLINTON MINING DIVISION. 
Report of F. Soues, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit my annual report on mining in the Clinton Division of 
Lillooet District for the year ending December 31st, 1907. 

There has been no improvement in mining during the year. Placer mining is solely done 
now by a very few Chinese and also a few Indians on the exposed portions of the bed of the 
Fraser river at extreme low water. Their earnings are so diverted that I cannot arrive at any 
certain amount, but the total does not amount to over $1,000. 

Mineral claims have been recorded on the Lower Bonaparte, and on one or two develop- 
ment work has been done. 

Claims recorded on Mahood lake last year have had no development work done on them. 

A Keystone drill has been placed on one of the dredging claims at Big Bar and one or 
two bores put down to a depth of 40 or 50 feet. Intense cold setting in early in December, 
the work had to be shut down, as the motive power is steam ; boiler and all pipes emptied at 
night and re-filled next day. Work on this enterprise will be taken up in the spring as soon 
as weather conditions will permit. 

Office Statistics — Clinton Mining Division. 

Mineral claims recorded 9 

Placer claims re-recorded 1 

Certificates of work 9 

Mining leases in force 10 

Dredging leases in force 1 ^ 

Conveyances recorded o 

Revenue Collected. 

Free miners' certificates 8 84 -50 

Mining receipts, general 5,270 50 

85,355 00 



8 Ed. 7 Alberni District. L 147 



VANCOUVER ISLAND AND COAST. 



ALBERNI DISTRICT. 



ALBERNI MINING DIVISION. 

H. C. Rayson, Acting Gold Commissioner. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my annual report of mining in the Alberni Mining 
Division during the year ending December 31st, 1907. There has been practically no work 
done beyond that absolutely necessary for assessment purposes. 

Office Statistics — Alberni Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates 56 

Mineral claims recorded 3-1 

Certificates of work recorded ' 50 

Transfers recorded 8 

Certificates of improvements issued 7 

Placer leases issued 8 

Powers of attorney recorded 10 

Consents to cancel 3 

Options on mines , 1 

Crown-granted mineral claims on roll . 143 

Revenue. 

Mining receipts 8678 15 

Free miners' certificates 353 25 

Acreage tax on Crown-granted claims 1,125 10 

$2,156 50 
Note by Provincial Mineralogist. 

This is all the report that has been sent in by the Gold Commissioner of the Alberni 
Mining Division, a fact much to be regretted, but it must be explained that he is a recentlv 
appointed official and has probably not as yet become conversant with the mining develop- 
ment going on in his Division and the necessity of gathering data relative to the same. 

The Provincial Assayer was engaged in the immediate vicinity of Alberni during the 
past summer, on work to be used in the preparation of a bulletin for the Bureau of Information, 
and he transmits the following notes on the Star group of mineral claims : — 

Notes by Provincial Assayer. 

This group of claims is situated two and a half miles up Taylor river, 
Silver Star. which flows into Sproat lake, in Alberni Mining Division. At the point 
where the claims are located the creek is only a few feet above the lake 
level. At 200 feet above the creek a tunnel has been driven into the hillside a distance of 
103 feet. At about half this distance a stringer of quartz was struck and the tunnel turns 
slightly to the left and is in 6 feet ; this has cut through a clearly defined quartz vein 6 ft. 
wide, which is separated from the 18-inch stringer referred to by a gouge parting. There is 
also at this point a cross slip showing a movement of 6 inches. The strike of the main vein 
is N. 40° E., running directly into the hillside and dipping nearly perpendicular ; it shows a 



L 148 Report of the Minister of' Mines. 1908 



slightly banded structure of white and blue quartz mineralised with speckled and banded 
pyrite, chalcopyrite, blende, bornite and a little mispickel, fairly well mineralised and evenly 
distributed. 

About 96 feet above the lower tunnel an open cut has been run in 12 feet. This shows 
a quartz vein 5 feet wide with a strong gouge parting on the foot-wall, the dip being nearly 
perpendicular but slightly to the east. The vein is mineralized similarly to that seen in the 
lower tunnel, and as it has the same strike there is no reason to suppose that it is not the 
same vein. 

A series of shots have been put in higher up the hill, tracing the vein for 700 feet and 
showing it to be about the same character as noted below. 

About 200 feet to the east of this open cut a few shots have been put in, showing a 14- 
inch quartz vein mineralized with marcasite and mispickel, and between the vein and the open 
cut another 10-inch stringer was noted. It is quite possible that these different veins and 
stringers may unite in one good strong vein. The country rock is diabase. 

The vein on the Silver Star group is supposed to be the same seen on the Jingo Bird 
claim, at the top of the hill, and reported on in 1899. 

The assays being low, this property will probably be worked as a concentrating propo- 
sition, and there should be no difficulty in shipping the concentrates. 

An average sample gave the following assay : — Gold, .08 oz. ; silver, .60 oz. ; copper, .OS %. 



CLAYOQUOT MINING DIVISION. 
Report of W, T. Dawley, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit my annual report of the mining operations in the Clayoquot 
Mining Division for the year ending December 31st, 1907 : — 

Very little activity has taken place during the j^ear on the various mineral claims, outside 
of the Indian Chief group at Sidney inlet. On this particular group a large force has been 
employed throughout the year, building an aerial tramway, wharves and bunkers, as well as 
doing considerable mining. In the latter part of the year two shipments of ore were made 
The claims are held under bond by the Vancouver Island Copper Co., Cross & Co., of Victoria, 
agents. In December the Hetty Green group at Deer creek, owned by J. Thomson, of 
Alberni, and the Kallapa group at Disappointment inlet, were bonded to New York capitalists, 
and work is being carried on on both groups with a small force of men. With the exception 
of the annual assessment work, which has been done on most of the claims in the district, the 
claims mentioned are the only ones on which any extended work has been performed. 
In November application was made for leases on eight claims (placer) at Wreck bay, the same 
ground having been worked some years ago. 

Office Statistics — Clayoquot Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates issued 30 

Mineral claims recorded 27 

Certificates of work recorded 45 

Bills of sale, bonds, etc., recorded 16 

Certificates of improvements recorded .... 13 

Revenue. 

Free miners' certificates $136 25 

Mining receipts 679 25 

Total $815 50 



8 Ed. 7 Alberni District. L 149 



QUATSINO MINING DIVISION. 

Notes by the Provincial Mineralogist. 

Leaving Victoria on August 7th, the Provincial Mineralogist proceeded by C. P. R. Co.'s 
steamer " Tees " to Quatsino sound, from which place shipments of bog iron had been made 
by the Moore Investment Company, of Seattle, to the Irondale iron furnace. 

On arriving at the claims it was found that this company had 
Quatsino Iron acquired certain claims on the north side of the West Arm, in Section 20 
Ore. of the Quatsino land district, as nearly as could be determined. The 

claims extend to the edge of the Arm, and, at a point about a quarter of a 
mile from the water, a deposit of bog iron ore of excellent quality had been discovered, covering 
the surface over a considerable area. To extract this ore, the Moore Investment Company 
had, earlier in the year, sent up a large force of men on an ore barge, and had built a temporary 
wharf, from which a tramway was built to the iron ore deposit. In August, the property 
was found to have been abandoned, the track torn up and the rails shipped away. From the 
workings visible it would appear that the iron deposit, over an area 300 feet long by 200 wide, 
had been removed from the surface down to solid bedrock, and this area had yielded 1,500 tons 
of ore, which had been shipped. The work done showed the deposit of bog ore to be on a side- 
hill, which sloped at an angle of about 20° towards the sea, hving on a smooth, water-worn 
bedrock to a depth of, in some places, four feet, and in others, of as many inches ; the average 
thickness of the deposit was not over 24 inches. Large trees and brush had been growing on 
top of the deposit, the roots being all through the ore, greatly increasing the cost of extraction, 
which, under the circumstances, must have been excessive. The superficial area over which 
the deposit shows is considerable, but no prospecting that has been done proves it to be of a 
greater average depth than at the point where its extraction was attempted. 

A few miles to the west, along the shore of the Arm, a trail leads 
Prince's Iron inland to the north for a couple of miles, to what is known as Prince's 
Claims. Upper Claims, a group of claims the number or names of which could not 

be ascertained. About two miles in on the trail two large cabins were found, 
and evidences that considerable work had been done, but no one was on the propertv when 
visited. The work had consisted of pits and open cuts along the course of the valley of a small 
stream flowing into the Arm. For the most part the pits were full of water and the materials 
taken out from them so mixed upon the dump as to be meaningless. The open cuts were seen, 
however, and of these the one in which the most promising showing occurred started from the 
creek-bed and ran up the face of its gently sloping bank, showing in nearly horizontal layers, 
first, four feet of bog iron ore ; next, one foot of gravel with a layer of fine kaolin clay on top ; 
next, nine inches of iron ore, then two feet of ochre and clay, above which was the black surface 
mould. A similar showing was seen in another cut about 150 feet farther up the creek, and 
these may be taken as typical of the more successful strippings made. There is, undoubtedly, 
a very considerable area covered with iron ore, but, so far as could be seen, its depth had not 
been demonstrated further than described. Samples were taken from the lower four-foot 
deposit of ore, and upon assay gave 48.12 % — 48.31 % and 50.19 % of iron — with much organic 
matter. The ochre and clay stratum assayed 36.6 % of iron. 

About three miles to the north-west from Prince's Camp, claims, to the number of about 
100, had been staked during the summer by other parties. This wholesale staking had been 
done to blanket the district until the claims could be roughly prospected, when those not 



L 150 Keport of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



wanted could be dropped — the land being held for one year at an outlay in fees of five cents 
an acre. This procedure, although contrary to the spirit of the Mineral Act, was brought 
about by a tendency of certain local prospectors to stake "extensions" to any claims that 
might be found by outside prospectors. Xo work, other than staking, had been done on any 
of these claims, and as they were from six to seven miles back from the lake, through wet 
brush, they were not visited. 

The fact that coal measures, and probably workable coal seams, exist 

Coal Areas. on the west arm of Quatsino sound has been known for many years, as the 

coal seams at Coal harbour were at least partially prospected some years 

ago by a California company, which acquired the land and did a little work, but not enough to 

prove or disprove whether the seams were sufficiently extensive to permit of their being 

worked. 

About midway in the length of the West Arm, on the north side, the coal-bearing forma- 
tion shows up on the beach, these measures extending to the west for pretty nearly the length 
of the Arm. For some years the Quatsino Coal Syndicate, under the management of Thos. P. 
Pearson, has been prospecting for coal in this area, and, in 1905, put down three bore-holes at 
what is known as Pearson's "Lower Camp." The first hole was put down near the beach to a 
depth of 156 feet; the second hole was sunk about one-third of a mile inland and was drilled 
to a depth of 218 feet, while the third hole was about three-quarters of a mile inland and was 
put down to a depth of 40 feet. In none of these holes was any coal encountered of workable 
thickness, some three or four-inch seams were encountered in the second hole and also some 
gas, but the workings were eventually abandoned. 

Mr. Pearson then moved westward along the Arm to within three or four miles of its 
western extremity, where he established his " Upper Camp," and in the vicinity took up ten 
prespecting areas. On one of these areas he was able to locate a very fair seam of coal, some- 
what impure at the outcrop but containing great possibilities. The point at which the coal 
outcrops is about one mile from the Arm on the steep bank of Pearson creek, 100 feet above 
the bed of that creek and 175 feet above sea level. The seam dips S. 30° W., at a moderate 
angle, into the bank and towards the Arm. 

The work so far done is not claimed to be more than prospecting work, but consists of an 
upper tunnel, a rock cross-cut adit tunnel, which at 80 feet in cuts a coal seam, the outcrop of 
which is visible higher up the hillside. At a somewhat lower level, the second tunnel, also a 
rock cross-cut adit tunnel, has been driven, reaching the coal at 110 feet in. A slope in 
the coal connects the two levels and has been sunk about 30 feet below the lower level, while 
from the tunnel, a drive about 150 feet long has been made in the coal and along its strike. 

To prove the coal further to the dip, a bore-hole was being put down, which was then 
down 110 feet, and if the dip held true, should strike the seam at a depth of 120 feet. 

The seam, as exposed, lay under a clay shale and over a sandstone, giving the following 
section in descending order : — 

1' 8" — coal, 
9"— clay, 
2' 7"— coal, 
1' 0" — clay, 
4' 3" — coal, 
3' 0" — black shale and coal, 

13' 3" — total thickness of seam. 



8 Ed. 7 Alberni District. L 151 



The various layers of coal seemed to be about the same quality and a sample was taken repre- 
senting an average of the upper portion of the seam, which gave, at the Government laboratory, 
the following analysis : — 

Moisture -= 1.80% 

Vol. comb, matter. ... =30.67 % 

Fixed carbon =19.63% 

Ash = 47 . 90 % 

100.0 
It is premature, as yet, to predict what the future of the discovery may prove to be ; it is a 
strong, well-defined coal seam, somewhat dirty where struck, but that trouble may disappear 
in a short distance. The area of the seam remains to be determined, which will require time, 
but, as a prospect, it is decidedly promising. The location of the prospect is such that a rail- 
way to the Arm and good shipping facilities could be easily and cheaply obtained. The 
management is going ahead slowly but surely, and within a year should have some interesting 
data to present. 



QUATSINO MINING DIVISION. 
Report of O. A. Sherberg, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit my annual report of the mining operations in the Quatsino 
Mining Division for the year ending December 31st, 1907 : — - 

Very little mining work has been done during the year, beyond what was necessary for 
assessment work. 

On the June group, under the management of Mr. Michael Craig, development work has 
been carried on with a small number of men during the summer. About 50 tons of ore was 
taken out from the old workings on the June claim, an average sample of which assayed 5.95 % 
copper; $2.50 gold, and $1.60 silver, to the ton. 

In July work was started on building a narrow gauge railway from the south-east arm of 
Quatsino sound up to this property, a distance of 6 miles. Two miles of the road has been 
cleared and the timber cut out just wide enough for the road bed, and one mile has been 
partially graded. Work was closed down in November, and, when leaving, Mr. Craig told me 
that he expected to start up again in about two months. 

* The iron property situated on the north side of the West Arm, owned by the Moore Invest- 
ment Co., Seattle, Wash., was worked part of the summer and 1,500 tons of bog iron ore was 
taken out and shipped to Irondale, Wash. This property has also been surveyed this year. 

Some very rich free-milling gold ore was discovered and located between Lawn point and 
Klaskino inlet this summer ; but being late in the season no w r ork has been done to ascertain 
the value of the property. 

Office Statistics. — Quatsino Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates 50 

Mineral claims recorded 212 

Certificates of work recorded , 80 

Bills of sale, etc., recorded 27 

Revenue. 

Free miners' certificates , $ 217 00 

Mining receipts, general 1,011 25 

Total 81,228 25 



L 152 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



NANAIMO DISTRICT. 



NANAIMO MINING DIVISION. 

Report of Marshal Bray, Gold Commissioner. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit herewith ray annual report on the mining operations 
in the Nanaimo Mining Division for the year ending the 31st of December, 1907. 

Not as much development work has been done during the past year as in former years, 
but what has been done has shown very satisfactory results and many important discoveries 
have been made during the past year. There were 645 mineral claims in good standing on 
the 31st day of December, 1907, and more mineral claims were recorded than in the year 
1906. 

The Tyee Smelter at Ladysmith smelted about 55,000 tons of ore, and the Britannia 
Company's smelter at Crofton treated about 73,000 tons of ore, and the approximate value of 
metal produced by both smelters amounted to about $1,750,000, and this was all, or nearly 
all, from the British Columbia coast mines. 

Texada Island. 

The Marble Bay group of claims belonging to the Tacoma Steel Co., under the manage- 
ment of A. Grant, mined and shipped 6,237 tons, dry weight, of ore during the year 1907. 
The development work done on the property consists in sinking the shaft 100 feet deeper, 100 
feet of winze and 325 feet of drifting. The shaft is now 860 feet below the surface and 828 
feet below the sea level ; no new plant was installed during the year. The average number 
of men employed in and about the mine was 48 white men, with also 12 Chinese ore- 
sorters. This mine was closed down from the 24th of March to the 8th of June, 1907, owing 
to a strike ordered by the Western Federation of Miners, whose headquarters are at Denver, 
U.S.A. Shipments have been small since the drop in copper. On the No. 10 level (860 feet 
below the surface) a body of good bornite ore, of unknown extent and value, was struck, 
and the copper and gold values are more than maintained with depth. This company is also 
quarrying and burning limestone, and has now four new limekilns, able to turn out 300 
barrels of lime per day. 

On the Cornell mine but very little work was done during the past year. 

The Commodore group of mines, under the management of W. Thos. Newman, for the 
first half of the year employed 12 men and performed 600 feet of development work on the 
200-foot level, but the work was practically suspended during the latter half of the year. 
Some fine ore, assaying well in copper, with fair gold and silver values, was struck, but owing 
to the low price of copper, it is not intended to ship anything, other than trial lots, for some 
time to come, as the work is as yet on purely development lines. 

The Puget Sound Iron Co. leased its mines to Messrs. Cox & Moore, of Seattle, who have 
not been doing much work on the properties during the year, but are preparing to ship both 
copper and iron ore during the year 1908, as a tramway 1| miles long has been built, and also 
a wharf 400 feet long, with two large bunkers, at a cove about one mile south of the old 
Government wharf. This has all been done since June, 1907, at a cost of about $15,000, and 
150 tons of copper ore was shipped to the Tacoma smelter and the bunkers are full of iron ore. 



8 Ed. 7 Nanaimo District. L 153 



The shaft on the Loyal Lease mine has been deepened 100 feet and 500 feet of drifting 
has been done during the year. Two duplex pumps were installed, but, owing to the large 
volume of water, the property had to be closed down on the 1st of September last and did 
not ship any ore. 

The Texada Consolidated Co. leased the Cornell mine and is preparing to work the 
mine at an early date next year. 

Little development work has been clone on the claims on Texada Island during the past 
year, and what has been done was only to keep them in good standing. 

Yaldes Island. 

The Copper Cliff Mining Co., under the management of Win, Simison, has done consider- 
able work during the year in developing its properties, but owing to the low price of copper for 
last half of year has not been shipping. 

The Island Copper Co., owning the True Blue group of mines, has not been shipping any 
ore, but has had a small force of men doing development work on the claims for the past 
year. 

Considerable work has been done during the past year on properties on Phillips and 
Frederick arms, Thurlow, Cracroft and other islands, and the showings have been very 
favourable. 

Dunsmuir District. 

The Jubilee Mining Co. has not done much work on its two groups of claims during the 
past year. These are very promising properties, and if a waggon road of about 20 miles, which 
was "cruised out" last fa.ll, was built to the claims, these claims and this section of the 
district would progress, as there is a quantity of low grade ore in this portion of the district. 

Office Statistics for 1907. — Nanaimo Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates issued (individual) 219 

it it (companies) 7 

Mineral claims recorded 261 

Certificates of work recorded , 173 

Paid in lieu of work recorded 9 

Certificates of improvement recorded 8 

Crown grants applied for and issued , 8 

Bills of sale recorded 46 

Permission to re-locate 1 

Rental mining lease 1 

The revenue collected from the above free miners' certificates and mining receipts 
generally, for the } 7 ear ending 31st December, 1907, was $4,370.70, being about $900.00 more 
than the previous year. 



L 154 Report of the Minister of. Mixes. 1908 



VICTORIA DISTRICT. 



VICTORIA MINING DIVISION. 

Notes by the Provincial Mineralogist. 

Sooke. 

There has been some slight activity on the copper properties in the vicinity of Sooke ; 
the Bluebird and Willow Grouse group has been surveyed and had sufficient work recorded 
for Crown-granting, which will be done this coming summer. 

The Young property has been under bond to a Seattle syndicate, represented by Mr. 
Thomas, who has had a number of men at work developing the property and made a trial 
shipment of ore to the Ladysmith smelter. 

Port Renfrew. 

A little prospecting work has been carried on at the magnetic iron properties in the 
vicinity of Port Renfrew, but no serious attempt at development has been made. 

Mt. Sicker Camp. 

The Coppe?' Canyon group, on the river at the foot of Mt. Sicker, has been developed 
somewhat this past year and the shaft re-started, but has not, as yet, begun to mine ore. 

The Lenora mine was under bond to an English company, the Vancouver Copper Com- 
pany, under the local management of Mr. Edward Stables, who employed, on an average, about 
10 men prospecting the old mine and getting out some ore, shipments to the amount of 1,700 
tons being made during the year. During the latter part of the year, however, the mine was 
idle. 

The Tyee mine, which for some years has been the largest shipper of 
Tyee. copper ore on the Coast, has now been permanently closed down, as hope 

of finding other ore-bodies has been abandoned, no ore body of any size 
having been encountered below the 300-foot level, although development work was syste- 
matically carried on to a depth of over 1,200 feet. During the year, some 1,200 tons of ore 
was cleaned up about the mine and shipped to the company's smelter at Ladysmith, while 
2,000 feet of drifts and cross-cuts were run and two diamond drills employed in prospecting 
work. 

The X. L. mine was also operated by the Tyee Copper Co. up to the end of August last. 
Nearly 1,000 feet of sinking and drifting was done during the year, also a considerable amount 
of diamond drilling. The diamond drill was also used in prospecting other claims owned by the 
company. 

The company's smelter at Ladysmith, under the management of Mr. W. J. Watson, has 
been run almost continuously during the year on custom ores from various parts of the Coast 
District, supplemented by ores from Mexico. The company formerly received all its ores, etc., 
at the Wellington Colliery Company's dock at Ladysmith, from which point they were taken 
by railway cars to the smelter ore-bins ; recently, however, the smelter has built a dock of its 
own on the sand-spit opposite its property, the dock being connected with the smelter bins by 
an elevated inclined trestle, an arrangement which will very much facilitate the handling of 



8 Ed. 7 Victoria District. L li 



supplies. A photograph of this new dock and unloading arrangements accompanies this report. 
The smelter has arranged to double the furnace capacity of the plant this coming summer, 
which also necessitates a doubling of the engine, boiler and blower plant. 

The Richard III. mine was worked, until the drop in the price of 

Richard III. copper, with a force of 30 men employed in development and extracting ore 

from an ore-body which had been discovered in a lower level adjoining the 

Tyee ground. The company shipped to the Tyee smelter during the year about 4,000 tons of 

ore, which was taken from the mine to the E. k, N. Railway over the Tyee aerial tramway. 

The mine is at present shut down, presumably owing to the low market price of copper. 

KOKSILAH. 

The Bluebell group is a group of claims held by the Vancouver Island Mining & Develop- 
ment Co., Ltd., of Victoria — head office, London, England. At the beginning of 1907 a 
Sullivan diamond drill was installed and a series of holes put down on the formation to a 
depth of about 150 feet each. The results wei'e fairly encouraging, and from the data gathered 
from this work it was decided to put down a shaft. Towards the end of the year this work 
was commenced, the incline shaft being now down about 110 feet. This is following the ore 
body, and although the point touched by the diamond drill has not yet been reached, the 
prospects are decidedly encouraging, at several points the ore showing fair values. 

The King Solomon mine, adjoining the Bluebell and owned locally, has had very little 
work done during the past year. The present exposures certainly seem to warrant a further 
expenditure of capital. The whole formation in this district appears to be shattered, and it is 
the opinion of experts who have prospected the ground that there is every reason to expect 
settled and payable ore deposits in depth. 

Miscellaneous. 

An industry new to the Province, viz.: the manufacture of so-called 

Silica Brick. "Silica brick," has been started at Parson's Bridge, about six miles from 

Victoria, on the line of the E. & X. Railway, by the Silica Brick it Lime 

Company, Limited, a company composed of Victoria business men. As a new plant it would 

be deserving of mention, but as a new industry, which has a wide application, and might well 

be established at other points in the Province, a more extended notice of the process seems 

desirable. 

Silica brick, so called, are made from sand and lime (a description of the process is given 
later), and the product is a brick of absolutely standard dimensions, with sharp angles and 
corners and plane surfaces, filling the requirements of what is known in the east as a pressed 
" face brick," serving for the construction of ornamental fronts or faces of buildings, the 
uniform size and shape of the brick permitting of their being laid with almost imperceptible 
joints, and giving a smooth and uniform coloured front or face. The colour of the brick can 
be varied somewhat by the colour of the sand used in its manufacture, but those so far pro- 
duced in Victoria are of a light gray colour. The brick, therefore, finds a market as a "face 
brick," competing successfully with imported brick of this class, and is, in British Columbia, 
sold at a much lower price, as the freight rate on imported bi'ick is almost prohibitive. For 
all work where appearance is a factor in deciding the brick to be used, silica brick competes 
successfully with repressed clay brick, but for rough walls, where ordinay clay brick serves 
the purpose, it is not expected that, in the matter of cost per thousand, silica brick will com- 
pete with the common clay red brick, although it is claimed that the silica brick, being more 
regularly shaped, can be laid more quickly and cheaply than the irregularly-shaped red brick. 
Whether silica brick will become a substitute for red brick is a question of cost rather than of 
the quality, or durability, of the finished work. 



L 156 Report of the Minister of Mines. 190S 



The manufacture of silica-lime brick, while new in British Columbia, has been carried on 
extensively in Germany, the United States and Eastern Canada for 20 years, and the 
experience there obtained is that properly made silica-lime brick is quite as lasting as well 
burned clay brick, with which we are familiar. 

The Silica Brick & Lime Company's plant, near Victoria, consists of : — One Berg patent 
brick press; pressure, 1,700 tons; capacity, 18,000 to 20,000 bricks a day; 1 rotary sand 
dryer, 1 75-H. P. engine, 1 150-H. P. boiler, 2 60-ft. cylindrical retorts, 2 14-ft. mixers, 3 
belt elevators, 1 pulverizer, 2 worm conveyors, 40 flat cars, 12 hydrating cars, 200 lime boxes, 
with necessary tram tracks, turn-tables, etc. This plant is housed in suitable buildings, 
between which and the spur from the E. & N. Railway is a large " dock " or platform for the 
storage of brick awaiting shipment. 

The size of the manufactured brick is 8| by 4 by 2| inches thick. The raw materials for 
the brick-making are found immediately adjoining the plant and can be obtained at a minimum 
expense. The output of the plant up to December 31st, 1907, was about 1,100,000 brick. 

The process in detail is as follows : — The sand is wheeled from the sand-bed to a shaft 
leading to the basement, where a current of hot air is turned upon it until it is thoroughly 
dry ; the sand is then raised by an elevator, passed through a screen, where all particles of 
gravel are separated out and " conveyed " to a storage bin. In the meanwhile a somewhat 
similar process is going on with the lime. The limestone is carried from the quarries upon 
the company's ground to kilns, where it is burned ; it is then " hydrated," or slaked, by 
steam in an immense retort, in separate tins capable of holding about 50 pounds each ; 
thence it is "conveyed" to a storage bin on the same level with the storage bin for 
sand. The sand and lime from the storage bins are automatically dropped into a " dry 
mixing machine " — a covered trough in which revolves a shaft furnished with many arms — in 
the proportion of from 6 to 8 per cent, of lime to 92 or 94 per cent, of sand. After being 
thoroughly shaken together, the mixture is conveyed to the upper story, where the " wet 
mixing machine " is located. This machine is similar to the " dry mixer," save that, as the 
shaft with the arms attached revolves through the mixture, water is dropped upon it from 
taps above. When the mixture reaches the proper consistency, which is determined by the 
foreman in charge of the work, it is ready for forming ; it is then fed automatically down a 
shaft into the 4-mould " press," a huge iron machine, furnished with a number of moulds into 
which the mixture of lime, sand and water is automatically forced by great pressure. The 
mixture going in at one end of the machine and appearing to be but a mass of sand, comes out 
at the other in the shape of a dark grey brick. The bricks, as they are turned out by the 
machine at the rate of about 2,500 per hour, are placed by hand on iron cars; the latter are 
pushed by hand along a track to the " retorts,/ huge cylinders of steel, capable of holding 20 
cars bearing 20,000 bricks ; the retorts are then closed and 130 pounds pressure of steam is 
turned on from valves in the shell of the retort, the bricks being left under this pressure for 
from eight to ten hours, when they are ready for use and are conveyed to the shipping 
platform. . 

The strength and lasting qualities of silica brick — properly made — has been amply 
demonstrated in the East, where this brick has been in use for years, and it is found 
that the bricks increase in strength and hardness with time, which is essential to the 
proper " setting " of the lime. That the Victoria company's brick are " properly made " 
and up to the Eastern standard, it is of course impossible to prove by the test of 
years, but the company evidently intends to apply every other test to its product, and 
has caused these tests to be made by competent and independent persons. The Govern- 



8 Ed. 7 Victoria District. L 157 



ment Laboratory tested the absorption, of water by the brick, and found it to absorb less than 
10 % moisture. Sample bricks were completely, or partially, submerged in water, and, while 
wet, were subjected to 20° frost for three days, after which they were thawed quickly and 
raised to temperatures of from 200 to 250° F., and at the end did not appear any the worse for 
the test, not having scaled or cracked, being apparently unaltered. It would appear, therefore, 
that the brick is unaffected by climatic changes. 

The crushing strength of silica brick has been demonstrated by Mr. James K. Rebbeck, 
consulting engineer, of Victoria, who reports as follows, after making twenty-three distinct 
tests : — 

Mean breaking strain of ordinary red building brick, as given by accepted standai'd 
authorities — lbs. per square inch = 1,815. 

Mean breaking strain of tests of the " original product " of Silica Brick & Lime Company 
— lbs. per square inch = 2,192. 

Mean of tests of " standard product " of Silica Brick & Lime Company — lbs. per square 
inch = 3,326. 

By "original product" Mr. Rebbeck means the first product of the plant when unscreened 
sand was used, and by " standard product " the present output, made with screened sand and 
other improvements in the manufacture. 

The following are among the important structures already built with silica brick : — ■ 

Victoria Transfer Co., Victoria, 3 stories ; St. Joseph Hospital, new extension, 5 stories ; 
Brackman & Ker's warehouse, Victoria ; Bakeries, Limited, Victoria West ; David Spencer's 
new building, Vancouver, 8 stories. 

The Vancouver Portland Cement Co.'s plant at Tod Inlet has been in 

Cement. active operation all the year, and has made and sold nearly 150,000 barrels 

of Portland cement (350 Bis. to the barrel), of a total value of nearly 

$225,000 ; of this quantity, 125,000 barrels were used in the Province. * A description of the 

plant as it then existed was given in the Report for 1901, since when the plant has been very 

much enlarged and improved, until now it has a capacity of 300,000 barrels a year. 

On Esquimalt harbour Raymond & Sons are operating two large and 
Lime. improved lime-kilns, producing a lime of exceedingly good quality, which 

finds ready sale in Victoria and Vancouver. Messrs. Elford & Co. also are 
operating a lime-kiln on the west side of the Saanich arm, and are shipping lime in barrels. 

The following office statistics have been contributed by the Mining Recorder of the 

Division : — 

Office Statistics — Victoria Mining Division. 

1906. 1907. 

Free miners' certificates 190 708 

ii ii (special) 7 7 

Mining claims recorded 81 136 

Certificates of work recorded 163 122 

Certificates of improvement recorded 10 15 

Conveyances recorded 30 28 

Permits n 2 2 

Lay-overs n ... 1 2 

Abandonments m 1 

Revenue. 

1906, 1907. 

Free miners' certificates , 85,115 45 86,032 17 

Mining receipts, general 1,681 90 1,932 70 

86,800 35 $7,961 87 



L 158 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 

NEW WESTMINSTER MINING DIVISION. 

Report by J. Mahony, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit the following report of mining operations in the New- 
Westminster Mining Division for the year 1907 : — 

The claims recorded during the year were distributed as follows : — 

Britannia, Howe sound and vicinity 62 

Bowen island 22 

Gambier island 13 

Burrard inlet and vicinity 11 

Capilano, Lynn and Seymour creeks 46 

Sechelt inlet 3 

Welcome pass 3 

Nelson island 5 

Jervis inlet 12 

Pitt lake 1 

Stave lake and vicinity 50 

Harrison lake and vicinity , 15 

25-Mile creek 7 

Chilliwhack and vicinity 10 

There has been an increase in the number of free miners' certificates issued, and there has 
been a slight falling-off in the number of claims recorded for the year. There has been a great 
deal of prospecting at Stave lake and vicinity, Bowen island, and also in the vicinity of Harri- 
son lake, and I expect that considerable development work will be done during the year 1908. 
There has been a considerable increase in the number of certificates of work issued during the 
year 1907, showing that the holders of mineral claims are doing the development work required 
by the Mineral Act, and also showing that the mineral resources of this Division are being 
steadily developed. 

Through the courtesy of Mason T. Adams, managing director of the Britannia Copper 
Syndicate, Limited, I am enabled to supply some particulars of the work done on the claims 
held by the above company. There has been considerable development and diamond drill work 
done at the Britannia mine, with very encouraging results. The mine camp has been practi- 
cally remodelled, in the way of boarding-houses and dwellings ; a new saw-mill erected, and, at 
the beach, a new 25-drill compressor plant, driven by Pelton water-wheel, has been installed, 
the air being conducted to the mine through 18,000 feet of 8-inch pipe. The old mill has been 
completely remodelled, the milling plant changed from fine crushing to coarse crushing, with a 
gradual reduction of intermediate jigging operations on sized products. This construction 
work is not yet finished, but will practically be completed by the beginning of the year 1908. 

The office receipts show an increase over the year 1906. 

Office Statistics — New Westminster Mining Division. 

1906. 1907. 

Free miners' certificates issued . , 1158 1403 

Quartz claims recorded 283 261 

Certificates of work recorded 157 246 

Certificates of improvement recorded 15 23 

Conveyances recorded 94 47 

Revenue. 

1906. 1907. 

Free miners' certificates $6,484 85 37,295 30 

Mining receipts, general 2,507 70 2,131 50 

$8,992 55 $9,426 80 



8 Ed. 7 Victoria District. L 159 



REPORT OX THAT PORTION OF THE COAST OP BRITISH COLUMBIA, 

EXTENDING PROM POWELL RIVER TO KINGCOMBE INLET, 

INCLUDING THE ADJACENT ISLANDS. 

By J. Austen Bancroft. 

(From Summary Report of Geological Survey of Canada, 1907.) 

The work outlined in the following report is a continuation of that which was carried on 
by Mr. O. E. LeRoy during the summer of 1906. A week less than three months was spent 
this summer in actual field operations on the coast by the writer, who had with him a most 
efficient assistant in Mr. R. P. D. Graham, Demonstrator in Mineralogy at McGill University. 
That portion of the coast extending from the mouth of Powell river to the entrance of King- 
come inlet was covered, an examination being also made of the islands within this stretch, 
between Vancuver island and mainland. 

The general trend of the coast is here N. 52 J W, corresponding to a line drawn between 
these points, and along such a line the distance traversed was 112 miles. An idea can, how- 
ever, be gained of the irregular nature of this coast by the statement that 1,5-40 miles of coast 
were examined, 680 of this being mainland and the remainder representing the extent of 
shore line presented by the numerous islands. This is as fine an example as exists in the 
world of a deeply dissected land area which has been submerged. Vancouver island once was 
connected with the continent, and in the intermediate lowland there then existed at least one 
or two river systems, receiving tributaries chiefly from the east. Submergence drowned the 
river valleys, thus accounting for the salt water straits and inlets of to-day, while the many 
rugged islands represent former inter-stream areas. 

During Triassic, and probably late Palaeozoic, times this region fotmed a portion of the 
ocean floor, and sedimentation was taking place. The latter part of the Triassic was marked 
by intense volcanic action, probably subaqueous in origin. This history is expressed in the 
isolated area of argil lites, quartzites, and limestones, and the many varieties of volcanic rocks, 
such as amygdaloidal diabase, porphyrites, agglomerates, and tufas. 

During Upper Jurassic times these stratified rocks, which once covered the region, were 
intruded in a widespread manner by granite and allied rocks. This vast intrusion, known as 
the Coast Range batholith, is largely composed of granite, but over wide areas it passes into 
basic facies which are most interesting. Diorites and gabbros are very common, while in Bute 
and Knight inlets it exists over quite large areas as almost pure hornblende. On a few small 
islands to the west of Midsummer, and north of Fire island, there is a beautiful development 
of an orbicular or kugel diorite. 

The stratified rocks, then, formed the roof of this batholith. During the intrusion of the 
latter, portions of the roof were stoped off and engulfed within the magma ; others, partially 
attached to the roof, draped themselves into it as " roof pendants," while, in other places, the 
stratified rocks may have been actually folded into the magma. Especially up the deeper 
inlets, that is, towards the axis of the Coast range, the granite is locally gneissoid, and a 
schistose structure has been developed in some of the areas of stratified rocks. The strike o 
such gneissoid and schistose structures corresponds in general with the axial direction of the 
range. Two sets of dark dikes have cut the region since the cooling down of the batholith. 

To-day, erosion has removed the roof, with the exception of a few isolated patches, and 
has truncated the included stratified masses. It is exceedingly important that these scattered 



L 160 Report of the Minister of Mixes. 1908 

areas of stratified rocks be located and mapped, for it is within them, and especially along their 
contact with the intrusive batholith, that the prospector should look for minerals of economic 
value. Within the region examined about fifty areas of such rocks were located. 

Though only one fossil specimen had hitherto been found within the whole of this area, we 
were fortunate enough to discover five localities that contained among them at least four species. 

About thirty-five prospects were visited during the course of the summer. South "Valdez 
island was the only locality where mining operations were being carried on in the district at 
the time of visitation. From Kelly point to Quathiasca cove this island is underlaid by volcanic 
rocks. These represent a portion of one of the roof remnants of the batholith. Once floating 
on the plastic magma, during the adjustment upon cooling down, small faults formed in these 
volcanics. Heated waters and vapours passing up the fault and joint-planes deposited copper 
minerals along these cracks, and where the adjacent rock was very porous, because of its 
amygdaloidal character, it became impregnated, chiefly with chalcocite, and with less quantities 
of bornite and native copper. This accounts for the stringers of chalcocite along a zone of 
shearing in the Ajax claim, situated on the north of Deepwater bay (at an altitude of 950 feet 
above sea-level and about one mile from the shore), and for the irregular vein on the Ingersoll, 
situated about two miles from Copper Cliff] On the Ingersoll a very irregular vein of chalcocite 
with a gangue of calcite and quartz may be traced for 350 feet with a maximum width of 
fifteen inches, the country rock being unevenly impregnated for a width of thirty-four feet. 
The Copper Cliff, Commodore and Steep Island mining properties are situated on highly 
amygdaloidal beds through which are disseminated, over wide areas, chalcocite, a little native 
copper, and, on the Commodore, some bornite. 

From Open bay, on the east of South Valdez island, to within a mile and a half of Granite 
bay, on the west side, there extends a series of limestones and interbedded greenstones having 
a maximum width of a little over a mile. In this area, which deserves the most careful 
prospecting, a number of claims have been located. On the Lucky Jim, along a contact between 
the limestone and a greenstone layer, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, pyrite and some magnetite have 
been deposited. On the Geiler, a shaft twenty feet deep, sunk on a similar contact, displays a 
very good showing of chalcopyrite. A speck of free gold was noticed in a specimen taken from 
the Geiler. This area is, of course, not yet sufficiently examined to properly determine its 
possibilities, for at no point has it been opened up to a greater depth than twenty-five feet. 

On the north of Rodonda island the Elsie claim is staked on a deposit of magnetite that 
occurs at a contact between the granite and a patch of marble. At an altitude of 500 feet, 
one open cut has exposed fifty -four feet of magnetite, with a width of thirty-five feet, and at 
two other points smaller amounts have been uncovered. This propert} 7 should be tested in 
depth, for the ore is high-grade, and shipping facilities, although the ascent from the water is 
steep, could be quite easily arranged. 

The Shoal Bay area, which is now deserted, is associated with contact phenomena between 
the granite and stratified series. 

On Mars island, to the south-west of Baker island, small quantities of bornite and galena 
were found in a limited area of argillites and limestones. On one of the joint planes of a 
quartzite laver flecks of leaf gold were seen. 

On the north-west of Village island, in another area of argillites, a small amount of chal- 
copyrite and bornite was noticed. 

Granite, suitable for building stone, may be found at a number of different localities with 
excellent opportunity for immediate shipment by water. At Squirrel cove, Walsh cove, 



8 Ed. 7 Victoria District. L 161 



towards the head of Pendrell sound, and at Kwatsi bay, the granite affords such commercial 
possibilities. The area of orbicular diorite above mentioned would furnish a unique and very 
beautiful ornamental stone. 

In certain depressions on South Yaldez island, Maurelle island and especially Reade 
island, the finer grained glacial clays should make excellent material for the manufacture of 
bricks. 



L 162 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. 



Report of James McGregor, Inspector, West Kootenay and Boundary Districts. 

I have the honour to submit my annual report for the year 1907, with respect to the 
condition of the metalliferous mines in my district. 

Rossland District. 

During the year the principal shipping mines in this district have added greatly to their 
already large mining plants, and have also extended the mine workings to a considerable 
extent by continuous development. During my inspections I have always found the mines in 
a safe condition and the Act complied with. 

Aixsworth District. 

In this district there has been a great amount of development done, but as yet the 
number of shipping mines has not increased to any extent. Those mines which come under 
the Inspection Act I have found in a safe condition, the powder-houses also being well protected 
and the bunk-houses in a creditable condition. 

Slogan District. 

There has been some improvement in this district during the year, an increase in the 

number of mines operating under lease, also an increased activity in developing other mines 

and prospects. In every case, upon inspection, the mines which come under the Act I found 

in a safe condition. 

Xelson District. 

In this district the number of shipping mines remains about the same as in previous years, 
with an increased number of mines being developed. Upon my different rounds of inspection 
I found the mines being operated in accordance with the Act. 

Boundary District. 

The many mines in this district have accomplished much during the year, by increasing 

the facilities for handling larger outputs ; also, to further increase the same, they have 

extended the workings considerably. Upon inspection, I found them in good condition and 

the Act being observed. 

Lardeau District. 

In this district the number of shipping mines has not increased during the year, but a 
great amount of prospecting and developing has been carried on. Upon inspection of the 
different mines coming under the Act, I found them carefully managed with regard to safety. 

Kamloops District. 

The principal work in connection with mining in this district, carried on during the 
year, consisted principally of prospecting and developing. 

SlMILKAMEEN DISTRICT. 

The number of shipping mines in this district remains about the same as last year. A 
number of properties have been developed continuously and a great amount of prospecting has 
been carried on. I have always found, upon inspection, a desire displayed by the different 
managements to comply with the Act. 

Appended is a list of accidents which have occurred in or about the mines within my 
district during the year 1907. 



8 Ed. 7 Inspection of Metalliferous Mines. L 163 



Report of Thos. Morgan, Inspector of East Kootenay District. 

I have the honour, as Inspector of Metalliferous Mines for the East Kootenay District, 
to submit my annual report for the year 1907. 

The St. Eugene mine, situated at Moyie, and the Sullivan and North Star mines, near 
Kimberley, are the only mines that have worked during the year. Whenever I have visited 
these mines I have found all the requirements of the Act complied with and all precautions 
used for the safety of the men. 

The St. Eugene mine, situated at Moyie, is operated by the Con- 
st. Eugene. solidated Mining & Smelting Co. of Canada. The mine has been working 
steadily all the time and considerable work has been accomplished, with 
very gratifying results. The mine is well ventilated by compressed air and natural ventila- 
tion, and the timbering is all in good order. I last visited this mine on November 2nd. 

The Sullivan mine is situated about 2^ miles in a northerly direction 

Sullivan. from Kimberley, and is owned and operated by the Sullivan Group Mining 

& Smelting Co. Extensive work has been carried on during the year, 

with satisfactory results. On my last visit, October 2nd, I found everything in good order, 

sufficient ventilation, the timbering in good condition, and all other requirements of the Act 

complied with. 

The North Star mine is situated about \h miles in a westerly direction 
North Star. from Kimberley. On my last visit I found everything progressing favour- 
ably ; the men were supplied with an abundance of air and the timbering 
was good. 

Appended is a list of accidents reported from these mines during the vear. 



Report of Archibald Dick, Inspector of Coast District. 

I have the honour, as Inspector of Metalliferous Mines for the Vancouver Island and 
Coast District, to submit my annual report for the year 1907. 

During the past year I have inspected the following working mines : — Marble Bay, 
Cornell, Copper Queen and Loyal Lease, on Texada Island, in Nanaimo Mining District. 

The Marble Bay mine, on Texada Island, owned by the Tacoma Steel 
Marble Bay. Co., is under the management of Mr. A. Grant. The shaft is down 800 
feet from the surface, and as the collar of the shaft has an altitude of only 
52 feet above sea level, the bottom of the shaft is therefore 718 feet lower than sea level. On 
the 6th of August I inspected all working parts and much of the old workings, and found this 
mine well timbered with square sets, well put in, showing that the timber had been put in by 
men who understood the business. Ventilation good. There were 29 men working under- 
ground and 13 men on the surface. 

Here there is erected over the shaft a new head-gear, which is 90 feet high. This is not 
yet complete, so they are still using the old one, which at present stands in below the new 
head-gear. I drew Mr. Trelou's attention to the cage, that it had not got a cover overhead 
and he told me that they were getting a new steel cage with a cover overhead, which was due 
to arrive at any time. The mine is well supplied with steam engines, compressor and pumps 
of various kinds. 



L 164 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1808 



The Cornell mine is being worked under a lease by the Cornell Oper- 

Cornell. ating Company, under the management of W. C. Tonkin. There is only 

one shaft working, which I went down to the 260-foot level, where I found 

only three men working, as the stope was about done with, there being no more ore in sight. 

The mining plant was in very good condition ; the hoisting engine is 25 h.-p. and the boiler 

31 h.-p. 

The Copper Queen mine is being operated by the same company as is the 
Copper Queen. Cornell. The shaft at this mine is down 600 feet, the collar being at an 
altitude of 182 feet above sea level. I went down the shaft to the 600-foot 
level, and at the bottom of the shaft there is a rock drift in 40 feet. There were only two 
miners working in the mine, putting the shaft and everything in good condition. The manager, 
Mr. Tonkin, told me that there would not be any mining done until he was satisfied that 
everything was safe and in good working order for the men. 

The Loyal Lease mine is situated to the north of Van Anda, near 
Loyal Lease. Blubber bay, and is operated by the Loyal Lease Company, Limited, with 
C. H. Jacobs as manager. There is a shaft here down 300 feet, which had 
not been put down any farther since my previous inspection. At the bottom of the shaft 
there is a pumping station with a steam pump ; from the bottom of the shaft there are drifts 
to either side; the one to the east is in 170 feet, with several cross-cuts; the drift to the west 
side is in 150 feet. Down the shaft two miners and one trammer were working. The manager 
told me that they would continue the west tunnel 150 feet farther, and if they did not find 
ore, or something that would cause them to think that the rock was more favourable, they 
would have to suspend the work for a time. The equipment consists of a 20 h.-p. engine, 
one 50 h.-p. boiler, and one 2-drill compressor. 

I have no accidents to report this year from the metalliferous mines in my district. 



8 Ed. 7 



Inspection of Metalliferous Mines. 



L 16: 



LIST OF ACCIDENTS IN METALLIFEROUS MIXES, 1907. 



No. 



9 

10 

11 
12 
13 
14 

15 
16 
17 

18 

19 
20 

21 



23 

24 



Mine. 



Centre Star, Rossland . 
Brooklyn, Phoenix 



Rawhide, Phoenix 

Pontiac, Woodbury Ck. 

Centre Star, Rossland . 



White Bear, Rossland . 
La Plata, Kokanee Ck 
Centre Star, Rossland 



M. &S. Dev. Co., Mine 
[Woodbury 

Brooklyn, Phoenix 



Ai'genta, Hamill Creek . 



War Eagle, Rossland . . 



Idaho, Phoenix . . . 
Rawhide, Phcenix 

Le Roi, Rossland . 

Idaho, Phoenix . . . 



Date. 

Tan. 9 

12 

17 
28 

31 



Feb. 



213 
March 3 



Name. 



Loco Beau .... 

H. Scheltena . . 

Eric Lendems . 
Jacob Anions . . 

J. A. Junkins . 

Dominic Bianca 
Thomas Carnon 

Louis Manfron. 

H. H. Johnston 

Andy Lund . . . 

John H. Guism 
Thos. Baird . . . 
II. Greenhulgh 
Robt. Reid 



Rawhide, Phoenix . . . 
Mountain Rose, Phcenix 



25 Mother Lode, Deadwood 



Occupation. 



Details. 



Miner . 
Nipper 
Miner . 



Labourer . . . 

Shoveller . . . 
Miner 



April 4 
4 



P. Stanechuck. 
Nich. McKain. 
Frank Sado . . . 

Dom Bart el . . . 

R. E. Rohalv.. 



Blaster 
Miner . 



Timberman . 
Miner 



Shoveller . . 

Labourer . . . 

Blaster and 

Miner 
Blaster help'r 

Blaster 



Shoveller . 



Ed. T. Cooper. Trammer . 
A. J. Bible .... Boss labourer 



Kelly Kettner. 

Walter Murray 
Axel. Spanberg 



16 John Bine: 



Miner 



Skip loader 



Thumb broken by a piece of rock 
while loading a bucket. 

Slightly injured by a drill dropping 
on his foot. 

Face slightly cut by a drill. 

Killed by powder exploding in a 
missed hole. 

Fatally injured by a timber rolling on 
him in lumber yard. 

Leg broken by falling rock. 

Killed by powder exploding in a 
missed hole. 

Killed by powder exploding in a 
missed hole. 

Head cut by loose rock falling down 
raise. 

Killed by powder exploding in a 
missed hole. 

Head slightly cut by a falling rock. 

Head slightly injured by falling rock. 

Head slightly injured by car. 

Severely injured by exploding a box 
of caps in the blacksmith's shop. 

Slightly injured by the same accident. 

Fatally injured by the same accident. 

Eyes injured by the premature ex- 
plosion of a hole. 

Hand and arm severely injured by the 
same accident. 

Hand slightly injured by a car. 

Foot slightly injured by rock falling 
from car. 

Killed on ore dump by frozen ore 
falling on him. 

Back slightly injured by falling into 
an ore bin. 

Ankle injured by a piece of steel. 

Foot slightly injured by a rock falling 
on it. 

Ankle broken by being brought 
between skip and shaft timbers. 



L 166 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1908 



LIST OF ACCIDENTS IN METALLIFEROUS MINES, 1907.— Continued. 



No. 


Mine. 


Date. 


Name. 


Occupation. 


Details. 


26 


Centre Star, Rossland. . 


April 21 


John Lynch. . . 


Miner 


Arm broken by being caught between 
skip and shaft timbers. 


27 


Snowshoe, Phcenix 


27 


Kelly Kettner. 





Head slightly cut by falling rock. 


2S 


Mother Lode, Deadwood 


May 13 


W. A. Clark . . 




Fatally injured, crushed between car 
and side of tunnel. 


29 


Centre Star, Rossland. 


18 


Michael Notte. 


Trammer . . . 


Leg slightly injured by car. 


30 


// // 


June 4 


William Collin 


Ore loader . . 


Face cut by brake on railroad car at 
ore bins. 


31 


Old Ironsides, Phoenix . 


4 


E. Bragg 


Shoveller . . . 


Leg broken by falling rock. 


32 




15 


B. Butie 


Skip tender.. 


Fell off railroad car and slightlyinjured 
his wrist. 


33 


Eureka. Nelson 


20 


J. Ranville .... 


Manager .... 


Fatally scalded in sump. 


34 


Old Ironsides, Phrenix . 


21 


Chas. William- 




Ankle broken by cage striking chains. 


35 


a a a 


21 


son 
Joseph Quiun. . 


Shoveller . . . 


Leg broken by cage striking chains. 


36 




22 


L. G. Jukie . . . 


Driver ... 


Leg and back slightly injured by being 
jambed between car and timbers. 


37 


White Bear, Rossland . . 


25 


John Levkovig 


Skip tender. 


Killed by falling down shaft. 


3S 


Rawhide. Phcenix 


28 


James Noye . . . 


Miner 


Face slightly cut by falling in stope. 


39 


" 


July 6 


Robt. Hawkins 


Shoveller . . . 


Back and hand slightly injured by 
falling rock. 


40 


Old Ironsides, Phoenix . 


8 


Mik. Spodirvyk 


i, 


Killed by walking into chute. 


41 


Centre Star, Rossland. . 


9 


R. Hutchensen 


Miner 


Foot slightly injured by drill falling 
on it. 


42 


Mother Lode, Deadwood 


9 


M. Dulovich . . 


Trammer. . . . 


Fatally injured by falling down ore 
chute. 


43 


Centre Star, Rossland . . 


11 


John Bensen . . 


Labourer . . . 


Fingers injured in the rolls of samp- 
ling mill. 


44 


Brooklyn. Phcenix 


16 


Vyeloe Rode . . 




Leg broken b} - car. 


45 


Snowshoe 


„ 20 


Joseph Johns. . 


Miner 


Thumb injured by machine drill. 


46 




25 


C. T. Cooper . . 


Timberman 

[helper 
Tool sharpn"r 


Ankle crushed by timber falling on it. 


47 




2S 


Thos. Baird . . . 


Eye injured by piece of steel. 


48 




Aug. 5 


Harry Reid . . . 


Timberman. . 


Elbow and head injured by falling 
timber. 


49 


White Bear, Rossland. . 


12 


John Cavello . . 


Cage tender. 


Crushed by cage against side of shaft 
and killed. 


50 


Le Roi, Rossland 


17 


John Shart .... 




Killed by a premature explosion of 
powder. 


51 


Stemwinder, Phoenix. . . 


20 


Chas. Hamlin . 


Mill-hand . . . 


Hand injured, necessitating amputa- 
tion, by slippiug and striking saw 
in saw-mill. 



8 Ed. 7 



Inspection of Metalliferous Mixes. 



L 167 



LIST OF ACCIDENTS IN METALLIFEROUS MINES, 1907.— Continued. 



No. 



53 
54 



5o 

56 



58 
59 

60 
61 
62 
63 

64 

65 

66 
67 
6S 

69 

70 

71 



Mine. 



Silver Dollar, Camborne 
Snowshoe, Phcenix 



Rawhide, Phoenix 

Sunset, Cody 



Le Roi, Rossland 



Sunset, Hedley 

St. Eugene, E. Kootenay 



Sullivan, E. Kootenay. 



// // 



St. Eugene. 



Sullivan 



Date. 



Sept. 13 



30 



Name. 



M. Pierce. 



Jno. Blakemore 



Oct. 



30 Fred Moses . . . 

9 j Alex. Dansen. . 
16 Govanni Lasco. 

E. Lamby 



Feb. 



11 



12 



St. Eugene . 



Mar. 4 



April 6 



10 
15 
20 

May 1 



11 



11 



Jno. McKinnon 
Okus Harrett. . 

Geo. Smith . , . 
Jas. Rossie .... 
John Doyle . . . 
W. Ransome . . 

E. O. Sahlen . . 

Nelson Church 

Wm. McKane. 
Jas. Conners. . 
Leo Maldidier. 

Wm. Rogers . . 

D. McKay 

D. Angus 



Occupation. 



Shoveller . 

Miner .... 
Labourer . 



Muckerboss.. 

Timberman 
[helper 



Sawyer 



Shiftboss . . . 
Pumpman . . 

Machineman 

Labourer. . . . 



Details. 



Head slightly injured by falling over 
dump. 

Head slightly cut by falling rock. 

Instep slightly injured by loose rock 
falling on it. 

Killed in ore chute by falling ore. 

Was found unconscious in ore chute 
and died the following day. 

Killed on surface b}' lumber pile 
falling on him. 

Killed by fall of rock. 

Caught hold of the crossbar and the 
bale fell on his right hand, taking 
off part of his thumb. 

Two fingers bruised ; caught between 
chuck and drill. 

Leg bruised ; jammed between hoist 
and wall. 

Ankle sprained and back bruised by 
a fall from a ladder. 



Machineman Head cut by "a loose piece of rock 
falling, which he had been told to 
take down. 

Miner Right leg fractured and nose broken 

by drilling into powder in a missed 
hole. 



E\-es slightly injured by the same 
explosion. 



John Zackan . . 
A. Leljenburg. 



June 2 James Thorn 



Machineman 
Timberman. . 

Machineman 



Timberman 
[helper 



Carman . 
Mucker. 
Fireman 



Fell off a ladder and bruised his ankle. 

Finger smashed by the bale of the cage. 

Foot bruised by a small piece of rock 
falling on it. 

Killed by the explosion of a loose piece 
of powder which he struck with his 
pick. 

Killed by the same explosion. 

Shoulder bruised by a piece of loose 
earth striking him and rolling him 
down the stope. 

Knee bruised by being jammed 
between two mine cars. 

Finger bruised against the timbers 
while going down in the cage. 

Right thumb cut off by the plunger of 
feed pump. 



L 168 



Report of the Minister of Mixes. 



1908 



LIST OF ACCIDENTS IN METALLIFEROUS MIXES, 1901.— Concluded. 



No. 


Mine. 


Date. 


Name. 


Occupation. 


Details. 


75 




June 7 


A. Dundurand. 


Shoveller . . . 


Cut his foot bj- axe while cutting a 
plank on the side of the drift. 


76 




July 1 
3 


Mike Reagan. . 
R. Robertson . . 




Ankle bruised by moving mine cars. 

Leg bruised by a mine car which he 
was dumping. 






Labourer . . . 






78 




5 


L. A. Home . . 


Timberman. . 


Dropped his axe through the bottom 
of the cage, it lodged in the timbers 
of the shaft, and, when struck by the 
car, flew back into the cage, badly 
cutting Home's right arm. 


79 




23 


Thos. Summers 


Machineman 


Eyes badly injured and face and chest 
burned by the explosion of some 
powder which he was tamping into 
a hole with a steel drill. 






80 




23 


Wm. Preston . . 




Arm slightly bruised by the same 
explosion. 












81 




Aug. 11 


F. Rudd .... 


Tophand .... 


While dumping a car on top of ore 
bins caught his hand between the top 
and some timbers, cutting his finger. 






82 




12 


J. F. Cere 





Finger cut ; caught between car and 
timber. 


83 




12 


J. H. Hawke . 




Was oiling shaft at Concentrator. 
His jumper caught on another shaft 
and he was wound around it, bruis- 
ing back and shoulder. 


84 




2S 


James Nugent. 


Carman 


Foot and elbow cut by a rock falling 
down the stope. 






St 




28 


Walter Sorrell. 


Crusherman 


Finger bruised ; caught between a car 
and some timber on surface. 






86 





Sept. 21 


A. Ostrum .... 


Miner 


Hand cut by falling on a plank with 
a nail in it. 


87 





Oct. 9 


Neil McDonald 


Machineman 


Hand cut by a small piece of rock 
falling on it. 


88 





11 


Maurice Peters 


" 


Foot cut while at work in the stope 
by a falling rock. 


89 




16 


Angus McNeill 


a 


Arm broken and head cut by a fall of 






earth from the back of the drift. 


90 





Nov. 20 


Allan Ford .... 


n 


Foot cut by a drill falling on it. 


91 


// 


Dec. 6 


Gus. Johnson. . 


Mucker 


Hand cut by a piece of rock falling 
from the roof of the stope. 


qo 




16 


Valentine Sum- 
[mers. 




Caught his hand between the chute 






and the car, cutting his finger. 


93 




27 


J. Chisholm. . . 


Shoveller . . . 


Picked into powder in the muck, 
which exploded, injuring his face 
and eyes. 






94 




29 


A. Pickering . . 


Machineman 


Leg fractured by fall of rock from the 
hanging wall. 



8 Ed. 7 



Inspection of Metalliferous Mines. 



L 169 



Tabulated List of Accidents in Metalliferous Mixes, 1907, 



A 

B 
C 
D 
E 
F 
<; 
H 

I 

J 

K 
L 
M 



Cause of Accident. 



Blasting 

Defective powder 

Drilling into old holes containing powder . . 

Powder in muck 

Shafts and cages, accidents connected with. 

Falling down shafts or winzes 

Falling down chutes 

Mine cars 

Rock falling in stopes, levels, etc 

Rock falling down chutes or openings 

Timbering , 

Miscellaneous, underground 

Surface 

Totals 



Extent of Injcry. 


Fatal. 


Serious. 


Slight. 

1 


1 


2 


2 











4 


1 


1 


2 


1 





1 


5 


3 


1 








3 








1 


1 


9 


1 


4 


13 


1 





2 








2 


1 


1 


12 


4 


3 


12 


20 


20 


54 



Total. 




6 
3 
9 
1 
3 
11 
18 
3 
2 

14 
19 
94 



Accidents for each 100,000 tons ore mined 1.11 

Accidents for each 1,000 men employed 5.4 



1.11 
5.4 



3.00 
14.6 



25.4 



L 170 Report of the Minister of Mixes. 1908 



COAL MINING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



The general wave of commercial prosperity which ushered in the year 1907 carried the 
production of coal in British Columbia to a point higher than it had ever before reached, 
although the wave did recede before the year was much more than half spent. During the 
first half of the year the collieries were taxed to their uttermost, or at least would have been, 
such was the demand for coal, but that the transporting railways failed lamentably to supply 
cars, and the labour market to provide men enough to mine the quantity of coal desired. 

Shortly after the middle of the year the financial stringency in the East, combined with 
the great drop in the market price of metals, began to make itself felt in the "West by the 
retarding of all industrial enterprises, more particularly as affecting the coal consumption, by 
the shutting down of most of the smelters in the country and of the mines dependent on 
them. These conditions were more keenly felt by the collieries of the Interior, while the 
Coast collieries, whose chief export market is San Francisco, felt and shared the financial 
depression that city so early manifested ; added to these difficulties the coal mines in the 
Orient — Australia and Japan — in the expectation of a shortage of coal here, rushed in to 
San Francisco and Puget Sound ports large shipments of coal which, arriving as they did 
on a market which had suddenly diminished, served to glut the market, with the result 
that the Coast collieries were forced to slacken, and, in some cases, suspend shipments during 
the last months of the year, and, as the returns show, put much of their product of both coal 
and coke into " stock." 

The production of the collieries of the Province in the year 1907 was greater than that 
of any preceding year, and amounted to 1,800,067 tons of coal, having a value of $6,300,235, 
to which must be added a production of 222,913 tons of coke, worth $1,337,478. As compared 
with the preceding year, these figures represent the following increases : — 

Coal, increased in quantity, 18.6 %, and in value, 38.6 %. 

Coke, I. „ 10.6 %, n 34.2 %. 

Increase in value of coal and coke, 37.7 %. 

The producing collieries during 1907 were practically the same as in the previous year, 
viz. : — The Crow's Nest Pass collieries in the Rocky Mountain coal field, in the south-eastern 
portion of the Province, and on Vancouver Island the Western Fuel Co.'s collieries at 
Nanaimo, and the Wellington Colliery Co.'s collieries at Extension and Comox. 

In addition to these older producers, a new colliery — the Middlesboro Colliery in the 
Nicola valley — began to ship coal towards the end of the year, producing about 11,000 tons, 
while three small collieries were opened up near Nanaimo, which, although not as yet con- 
tributing much to the Provincial output, give promise of greater things in the future. 

Although at present the supply seems to be in excess of the demand, this condition can- 
not long remain in the face of the rapid development of the whole Pacific Coast, the greater 
portion of the whole supply for which must be obtained from British Columbia. 

The gross amount of coal mined in the Province during the year 1907 was 2,219,608 
tons (2,210 Ihs.), an increase over the preceding year of 320,532 tons, or about 17 per cent. 

Some 419,511 tons of this coal was made into coke, of which there was produced 222,913 
long tons. 



8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mixing. 



L HI 



The distribution of this output of coal and coke is shown in the following table : — 
Coal and Coke Produced, Exported, <kc, by Province during Year 1907. 



Sal*bs axd Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 lbs.) 


Tons. 


ewt. 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Sold for consumption in Canada 

n a to other countries 


916,262 

651,076 
22,038 




155,579 
60,110 


















215,689 

















Total sales 




1,589,376 






419. .341 
165,931 












Used under colliery boilers, etc 
















Total for collierv use 





585,472 














13,289 
58,049 






1,55S 

8,782 








Stocks on hand first of year 


J. 174,848 




















44,700 




7,224 




Difference added to stock during year 


















Output of colliery for year 


2, 219.0ns 


222,913 



















By-products — Fire-clay, 488 tons. 

Number of Hands Employed, Daily Wages Paid, kc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


Xo. Eui- 
ploj-ed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


Xo. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily Wage. 


Xo. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


Superyision and clerical assistance . 


112 
1,871 
560 
739 
541 
158 
132 
273 
3 


83.50 to |10 
3.00 to 86.50 
1.75 to 3.30 
2.50 to 3.50 
2. 75 to 3.55 
1.10 to 2.45 
1.35 to 2.25 
1.35 to 2.25 
82.86 


64 


83.50 to 86.00 


176 
1,871 

560 

1.232 

1,075 

2< 15 

174 

743 

23 


8 
3.50 to 10 

3. On to 6.5o 


Labourers 

Mechanics& skilled labour. 

Boys 

Japanese 






1.75 to 3.30 


493 

534 

47 

42 

470 

20 


82.50 to 83.00 
2. 75 to 4.50 
1.50 to 2.25 
1.35 to 1.65 
1.35 to 1.75 

1.48J to 1.75 


2. 50 to 3. 50 
2.75 to 4.5U 
1.10 to 2.45 
1.35 to 2.25 
1.25 to 2.25 
1.48} to 2. 86 


Totals 


4,389 




1,670 




6,059 













COLLIERIES SOOX TO BE PRODUCING. 

The Pacific Coal Co., a subsidiary company of the Canadian Pacific Railway, owns large 
coal areas at Hostner, on the line of the C. P. Ry., a few miles north of Fernie, and adjacent 
to the lands of the Crow's Xest Pass Coal Company. This colliery has been under process of 
equipment for the past two years and would have been shipping before this, but for some legal 
obligation not to enter the market before 1908. 



L 172 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



The various coal seams developed by the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co. on the adjacent areas 
are here found dipping at a high angle into the hill, outcropping high up on the mountain. 
To reach these seams the company has driven in two large parallel tunnels through rock, 
starting at a point well above the valley but below the outcrops. These tunnels cut the coal 
seams, at a distance of from 1,300 to 1,500 feet in, nearly at right angles, and from these 
main tunnels workings are being started off on either side at each seam. 

The tipples and other plant, as well as the coke ovens, are on a bench slightly above the 
general valley of Elk river, and down to this level the coal will be lowered from the tunnel 
mouth by an incline some 4,000 feet long. 

By the end of the year the plant and equipment were nearing completion, the mines 
being sutiiciently developed to begin large shipments at any time, ami during the coming year 
should make a large output. 

The management of the property is in the hands of Mr. R. G. Drinnan, who for some 
years past has successfully filled the position of manager and general superintendent of the 
Crow's Nest Pass collieries. 

In the Nicola valley the Diamond Vale Colliery has been opened up to a certain extent, 
and has made small shipments since the close of the year. Further notice of this colliery is 
given on page 142 of this report. 

On Vancouver Island three new collieries ha\e been opened up this year, notice of which 
is taken in the Report of the Inspector of the district herewith attached. 



COAL PROSPECTS. 

Of the coal prospects seriously developed, but not as yet approaching the shipping stage, 
probably the most important are up the valley of the Elk river, above Michel creek, in East 
Kootenav, on the western slope of the Rockies. Here there are a number of areas owned by 
various companies, but the Impel ial Coal & Coke Co.'s properties are probably the most 
developed, and there is little doubt but, that within a year or so, a railway will be built up the 
valley of the Elk which will enable them to ship their coal. 

No important developments have occurred in the southern portion of what is known as 
the Flathead District, but in the northern part of the district, on the south fork of Michel 
creek, Mr. Corbin, of Spokane, and associates have done some important work and, having 
secured a railway charter, are expected to very soon begin serious development. 

Coal has been discovered on Bear river, a tributaiy of the Fraser river entering above 
Ft. George, and near the line of the G. T. P. Ry., but this discovery requires to be developed. 

The lignitie coal beds near Princeton remain undeveloped, but, as the construction of a 
railway to that point is nearly completed, development of these coals will not be postponed 
much longer. 

To the west of Princeton, at the head of Granite creek, once a well-known placer gold 
stream, extensions of the coal beds first discovered at Collins gulch have been prospected, with 
results which are encouraging. 

The coal field on the Telkwa river, in the Bulkley valley, is still quite undeveloped, but 
other small areas have been discovered in the district. 

The older known coal areas on the Queen Charlotte islands have remained unprospected 
and undeveloped, but some new areas have been located on Skidegate channel, on which a 
small amount of prospecting has been done. 

On Malcolm island and on the adjacent shore of Vancouver island the coal areas, long 
known to exist there, are being prospected by diamond drilling. 



8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mining. 



L 173 



On the west arm of Quatsino sound a new coal area has been discovered and a small 
amount of prospecting done, which is more fully described on pages 150-151 of this Report. 



COLLIERIES OF THE COAST DISTRICT. 

The gross output of the Coast Collieries, including the Nicola valley, for the year 1907 
was 1,342,877 tons (of 2,240 lbs.) of coal actually mined, but of this quantity some 44,760 
tons were put into "stock," making the actual consumption of coal 1,298,117 tons. 

Of this gross consumption, 1,079,715 tons were sold as coal, 121,701 tons were consumed 
by the producing companies as fuel, while 96,671 tons were used in making coke, of which 
there was produced some 16,372 tons (2,240 Bbs.) of which 14,812 tons was sold and 1,560 
tons added to stock. 

The following tables gives an aggregate summary of the output of the Coast Collieries for 
the year 1907, and shows the dispositions made of such product : — 



Sales and Output for Year. 




Co 


\L. 






Coke. 




(Tons of 2,240 lbs.) 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Sold for consumption in Canada 

// export to United States 


698.041 

359,666 

22.038 




14,592 

220 


14,812 
1,560 






















1,079,745 






















96.671 
121,701 






219 
1,779 






























218,372 
1,298,117 






13,289 
58,049 





















44.760 


























Output of Colliery for year . 


1,342,877 


16,372 





By products Fire Clay (tons), 488. 

Number of Hands Employed, Daily Wages Paid, etc. 



Character of Labour. 



Supervision and clerical assistance .... 
Whites — Miners 

Miners' helpers 

Labourers 

Mechanics and skilled labour 

Bojs 

Japanese 

Chinese 

Indians* and Hindust 



Totals 2,862 



Underground. 



No. Em- 
ployed. 



72 
1,160 
440 
539 
120 
123 
132 
273 
3* 



Average 
Daily 
Wage. 



3.50 
3.00 
1.75 
2.50 
2. 75 
1.10 
1.35 
1.35 



to 10 
to 6.50 
to 3.30 
to 3.5') 
to 3.55 
to 2. 45 
to 2.25 
to 2.25 



Above Ground. 



No. Em- 
ployed. 



45 



2.86 



93 

194 

43 

42 

470 



Average 
Daily 
Wage. 



3.50 to 6.00 



2. 50 to 3. 00 
2. 75 to 4. 50 
1.50 to 2.25 
1.35 to 1.65 
1.35 to 1.75 



20t 1.4Sitol.75 



907 



Totals. 



No. Em- 
ployed. 



117 
1,160 
440 
632 
314 
166 
174 
743 
23 



3,769 



Average 

Daily 

Wage. 



3.50 to 10 
3. 00 to 6. 50 
1.75 to 3.30 
2. 50 to 3. 50 
2. 75 to 4. 50 
1.10 to 2. 45 
1.35 to 2.25 
1.25 to 2.25 
1.48ito2.86 



L 174 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



INSPECTION OF COAL MINES, 1907. 



VANCOUVER ISLAND AND COAST INSPECTION DISTRICT. 
Report of Arch. Dick, Inspector. 

Sir, — I have the honour to herewith submit my annual report for the collieries in this 
District for the year ending 31st December, 1907, together with a list of all accidents and the 
colliery returns. 

The collieries operating during the year, including the new mines that have been started, 
were : — 

Nanaimo : The "Western Fuel Company — No. 1 shaft, Protection Shaft, No. 4 North- 
field Mine. 

Fiddick Property, South Wellington, Cranberry District, 1 tunnel, 1 shaft. 

Gilhllan Colliery, Wellington, 1 slope 

New East Wellington Colliery, Mountain District, Nanaimo, 1 slope. 

Extension : The Wellington Colliery Company — Nos. 1, 2, and 3 mines. AH worked 
from what is known as the No. 1 tunnel. 

Cumberland : The Wellington Colliery Company — Nos. 4 and 7 slopes, and Nos. 5 and 6 
shafts. 

Nicola Valley : The Middlesboro Colliery, Nicola Valley Coal and Coke Company's Nos. 
1 and 2 mines. 



The Western Fuel Company. 

Head Office, San Francisco, Cal. 

Officers. Address. 

John L. Howard, President or Chairman, San Francisco, Cal, 
James B. Smith, Vice-President or Vice-Chairman, San Francisco, Cal. 

D. C. Norcross, Secretary, San Francisco, Cal. 

Joseph L. Schmidt, Treasurer, San Francisco, Cal. 

Thomas R. Stockett, Manager, Nanaimo, B.C. 

Thomas Graham, Superintendent, Nanaimo, B.C. 

Capital of the Company, 81,500,000. 

The above company has operated the following collieries at Nanaimo during the past 
year, viz. : — No. 1 or Esplanade Shaft, Nanaimo; Protection Island Mine; No. 4 Northfield 
Mine. 



8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mining. 



L 175 



The following returns show the combined output of the company's mines for the past 
year :— 

Returns from Western Fuel Co.'s Mines for Year 1907. 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2.240 lbs.) 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Tons. 


cwt 


Sold for consumption in Canada 

n export to United States 

// // to other countries 


221.712 

218,014 

4,309 
























444,035 
51,602 


























51,602 


















9,367 
18,022 








495,637 


















8,655 
504,292 
















Output of Colliery for vear . . 



















Number of Hands Employed, Daily "Wages Paid, <fcc. 





UXDERG ROUND. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


Xo. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 

s~ 

3.30- 6.50 

2.S6 
2.86- 3.25 
2.86- 3.55 
1.10- 2.45 


Xo. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


Supervision and Clerical Assistance 


« 

496 
71 

472 
95 
52 


20 


• 


65 
496 

71 
500 
187 

73 

100 
3 








Mechanics and Skilled Labour . . . 








28 
92 

21 


2. 75 
3.00 - 4.50 

.50 - 2.25 










....... 




100 


1.50- 1.75 








2.86 














1,234 




261 




1,495 











No. 1 Shaft, Esplanade, Nanaimo. 

In the early part of the year the above mine was under the management of Mr. Thomas 
Mills, then for a time under Mr. Thomas R. Stockett ; now Charles Graham is manager, with 
Mr. John Newton overman. I have examined parts of this mine frequently each month 
during the year. 

No. 1 shaft and Protection Island mine can properly be regarded as one mine, as they are 
connected underground, and are under one system of ventilation ; all the workmen employed 



L 176 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



in the Protection Island section of the mine go up and down that shaft, but all the coal mined 
is conveyed to and hoisted out of No. 1 shaft. The workings of No. 1 shaft are spread over 
a very extended area ; from the working face on the north side to the workings on the south 
side, by the road, it is nearly five miles. There are two seams of coal in this mine now 
extensively worked, known as the Upper and Lower seams. The former is the coal that has 
been generally worked for a great number of years. In the north side this upper seam is 
mined in what is now known as the Xos. 2 and 3 inclines off Xo. 1 north level, in which all 
the mining has been at pillar coal. From the Xo. 1 level of this upper seam there are two 
rock tunnels down to the lower seam, known as Xos. 1 and 2 slopes, which seam is about 60 feet 
vertically below the upper seam. Most of the rock intervening between the two seams is hard 
conglomerate, which makes a strong roof for the lower seam. In the lower seam the coal 
varies in thickness from 30 to 40 inches, which is all of excellent quality, very hard, and 
stands handling well, and is worked on the " longwall " system, to which it is well adapted. 

The coal from the above districts is loaded into mine cars, which are collected from the 
different entries with mules and taken fully two miles to the bottom of Xo. 1 shaft by electric 
motor, two powerful motors being kept busy, and it being no unusual thing to see them going 
along with 90 cars loaded with coal. 

Ko. 1 Slope. 

This slope branches off Xo. 1 north level to the east, about 70 yards from the shaft 
bottom, and is down 6,513 feet. Xo. 7 east level branches off this slope at 5,055 feet down 
from Xo. 1 level, and is the lowest workings now in this mine. The level face is about 6,000 
feet from the slope and at a depth of 1,200 feet vertically below the mud-flats of the Xanaimo 
river. The coal mined here is hard and of good quality. 

About 1,000 yards down Xo. 1 slope, what is known as the Diagonal slope, branches off 
to the east. The workings off this slope and Xo. 7 east level are connected in many places, 
all the mining done in Xo. 7 level being towards the working of the Diagonal slope. The 
prospects for coal down this slope are good, and it is being extensively opened out. The coal 
from here is very good, much of the seam is over 9 feet thick and forms a large proportion of 
the output of Xo. 1 shaft. This slope has been driven into a large basin, with the coal rising 
all around, and to do away with the basin and much of the haulage the company went up the 
slope to what appears to be the rim of the basin, and has started a level rock tunnel to run 
across and strike the coal on the opposite side of the basin, where the workings now are. 
This rock tunnel will be 1,000 feet long, half of which is complete, having a sectional area of 
7 by 10 feet. When this tunnel is finished the basin above-mentioned will be allowed to fill 
with water, which will then make it safe against any collection of gas. 

Protection Island Mine. 

This mine is under the same management as Xo. 1 shaft, Charles Graham, manager ; 
Thomas McGuckie, overman. It is a continuation of Xo. 1 mine by the way of Xo. 1 slope 
to Xo. 3 north level, which level branches off Xo. 1 slope to the north, about 1,000 yards below 
the Xo. 1 north level, and is about lh miles long to where it originally intersected with 
Protection mine in the upper seam, where there are now only a few men working at pillars 
(coal) in what is known as Xo. 3 panel. 

From this Xo. 3 level there is a rock tunnel similar to that mentioned in Xo. 1 level of 
Xo. 1 shaft. From the bottom of the Xo. 1 slope there is another slope, but this is in the 
lower seam ; this slope goes to the east, and is again connected with Xo. 5 level of the upper 
seam slope by a level rock tunnel. The air for ventilating this lower seam comes down 



8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mining. 



L 177 



Protection island shaft ; thence down the slope to the level above-mentioned, through the rock 
tunnel at No. 5 level, up along all the working faces, out at the top, and away to the exhaust fan 
near No. 1 shaft. 

The coal in this lower seam is similar to that in No. 1 mine, and varies from 30 to 40 
inches in thickness with a hard rock roof. This seam has proved its regularity all under 
Nanaimo harbour, Newcastle island and Protection island, and is now very extensively worked 
by a large number of men. 

The ventilation of the above mines is good, there being an average of 92,000 cubic feet of 
air a minute going out the return airway to the No. 1 fan shaft, in addition to what goes out 
at Newcastle shaft. In this division there are 200 men and 20 mules. 

The No. 7 East level and the Diagonal slope are connected with the south return airway, 
in which 44,000 cubic feet of air a minute passes, going to the same No. 1 exhaust fan. In these 
lower districts there was a total of 60 men and 12 mules employed. 

In making my inspection I always have a Wolf safety lamp, and it is very seldom that I 
have seen a trace of explosive gas. The Wolf safety lamp is now the only safety lamp used in 
the Western Fuel Company's mine, and is found to give good satisfaction. 

In addition to Charles Graham, manager, with John Newton, overman at No. 1 shaft, and 
Thomas McGuckie, overman at Protection mine, there are fifteen firemen constantly going 
about the mine, watching that everything is in safe working condition. Besides these, there 
is a special fireman, whose sole duty is to travel and inspect the old workings and to find out 
the condition of the same. In addition to the other inspections, the miners working in the 
mine appoint a committee to examine all accessible parts of the mine, to see the condition 
and find out if there is any standing gas. This is done once every month, and takes sometimes 
three days with three men, and the result of their finding is posted up in a conspicuous place 
near the entrance of the mine. 

The following are the official returns from the No. 1 Shaft and Protection Island mines 
for the year 1907 : — 



Sales axd Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 lbs.) 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Tons. 


cwt. 




154,982 
142,623 

4,309 










































391,914 












Total Sales 














« under Colliery Boilers, &c 


28,933 


















28,933 












Total for Colliery use .... 








8,842 
13,997 






Stock on hand first of year 


330,847 




















5,155 












Difference added to stock during year. . 






















Output of Colliery for year . 


336,002 









L ITS 



Report of the Minister of Mixes. 



1908 



Number of Hands Employed, Daily "Wages Paid, &c. 



Character of Labour. 



Supervision and clerical assistance 

Whites — Miners 

Miners' helpers 

Labourers 

Mechanics and skilled labour . . . 

Boys 

Japanese 

Chinese 

Indians, natives of B. C 



Totals . 



Underground. 



No. Em- 
ployed. 



31 

2S6 
30 

236 
67 
39 



Average 
Daily 
\\ age. 



692 



3.30- 6.50 

2.86 
2.S6- 3.25 
2.86- 3.55 
1.10 - 2.45 



2.86 



Above Ground. 



No. Em- 
ployed. 



Hi 



24 

74 
16 



65 



195 



Average 
Daily 
Wage. 



3 



2.75 

3.00 - 4.50 

.50 - 1.65 



1.50 - 1.75 



Totals. 



No. Em- 
ployed. 



47 
286 

30 
260 
141 



65 
3 



887 



Average 
Daily 
Wage. 



Mine worked 295 days during year. 

No. 4 XORTHFIELD MlNE, XaNAIMO COLLIERY. 

George "Wilkinson, Manager. 

It was noted in a previous report that this mine gave promise of being a very pro- 
ductive coal mine, and this has now come true, as the annual colliery returns will show. The 
seam worked varies from 30" to 40" thick, yet in one shift of eight hours over 1,200 tons of 
coal were hoisted out of this mine. Xearly all this coal finds its way to the California market, 
where it is in great demand, and the calling steamships that have once tried it always want to 
get it again when they come back. 

The main hoisting is by a shaft 60 feet deep, from the bottom of which is a main slope, 
now nearly one mile long, on which the haulage is by the "endless rope" system; the rope 
haulage and bull-wheel being down nearly a mile. 

The workings of the mine are to the right and left of this main slope, and are known as 
follows: — Xos. 1, 2h, 3, 4 and 5 left levels, and Xos. 2, 3 and 4 right levels, No. 1 being 
stoped for the present. All the workings in this seam are worked on the longwall system, for 
which it is well adapted. Much timber is used in cogging the roof. The brushing, to make 
height for the roads, is taken from the floor. The seam, although thin, has proved to be 
regular and very extensive, and is the same being worked in Protection and Xo. 1 snaft, 
Xanaimo. 

In addition to the above seam, there are three rock tunnels to the upper seam, or what 
was called in early times the "Douglas coal." This coal is hard and of very good quality, 
although somewhat faulted in places. The first of these rock tunnels is started at about 800 
yards down, and has a grade down " with the load " of about 1 in 4 feet. After getting the 
coal here, a connection with the old Fitzwilliam or Xewcastle mine was made and a pump was 
put in that old mine, the water from these workings draining to it. This connection serves as 
the air intake, as well as a good travelling way. 



8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mining. 



L 179 



Near the bottom of the slope, on the left side, is another rock tunnel through to the 
upper seam, as well as a shaft for ventilating that district. The coal there was four feet thick, 
good and hard, but very little development had been done. 

The ventilation is good. Air velocity on the return airway, 1010x65 = 65,650 cubic 
feet passing a minute, split as follows : — 

No. 1 left, 17,000 feet, 60 men and 4 mules. 

.. 24 and 3 .. 10,000 .. 50 ,. 3 



ii 2 right, 5,000 „ 22 

■i 3 .. 6,000 „ 34 

ii 4 right and left, 10,500 .. 47 

Incline, 8,250 n 50 



1 mule. 
1 

2 mules. 
1 horse. 



Total 56,750 

The above shows a leakage of 8,900 feet. 

I have examined all the above works frequently, well up into the breaks in the roof, 
with a safety lamp, but have not yet seen a trace of explosive gas. 

In addition to the manager, there is a staff of 11 men continually on the move, watching 
and seeing that everything is all right. 

In this mine a large number of mining machines, run by compressed air, are at work, 
which is a great help to the ventilation. 

During a great part of last year a gang of men was working on the return airway, cleaning 
out all refuse and making it larger. This return airway is also the travelling road into the 
mine, and for a long distance is lighted by electricity, as is also the main haulage slope from 
the one end to the other, with electric lights placed at intervals of 30 feet, and with extra 
lights at all sidings. 

The following are the official returns of the Xorthfield colliery for the year ending the 
31st December, 1907 : — • 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 lbs.) 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Sold for consumption in Canada 


66,730 
75,391 













































142,121 












Total Sales 
























22,669 


















22,669 












Total for Colliery Use . . 










525 

4,025 
















164,790 








3,500 




























Output of Colliery for Year. 


168,290 



















L 180 



Report of the Minister of- Mines. 



1908 



Number of Hands Employed, Daily Wages Paid, &c. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


Xo. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


Xo. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


Xo. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


Supervision and clerical assistance 


14 
210 

41 

236 

28 

13 


f 


4 


s 


IS 
210 

41 
240 

46 
18 




3.30 - 5.00 

2.86 
2.S6 - 3.25 
2.S6 - 3.55 
1.10 - 2.20 






Miners' helpers 








4 

18 
5 


■2.75 
3.00 - 3.55 
1.00 - 2.25 




Mechanics and skilled labour .... 


















35 
66 


1.50 - 1.75 


35 

60S 






542 







Totals 





















Mine worked 292 days during year. 



Wellington Colliery Company, Limited. 
Head Office— Victoria, B. C. Capital 82,000,000. 

Officers. 
Hon. James Dunsmuir, President, Victoria, B. C. H. M. Hills, Secretary, Victoria, B. C. 

F. D. Little, Vice-President, n J. A. Lindsay, Treasurer, n 

The Wellington Colliery Company, Limited, has been operating the following mines 
during the year 1907, under the general management of F. D. Little, M.E. : — 

The Extension Colliery, in Cranberry District (Extension) ; Andrew Bryden, Manager. 

The Union Colliery, in Comox District, John Matthews, Manager. 

The amount and disposition of the combined output of this company's collieries is fully 
shown in the following table : — 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 lbs.) 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Tons. 


cwt. 


Sold for consumption in Canada 

n export to United States 

n n to other countries 


463,220 

141.652 
17,729 




14,592 
220 


14,812 
1,560 


























622,601 
165,465 










Total Sales 










Used in making Coke 


96,671 
69,794 






219 

1,779 






Total for Collierv Use .... 










3,858 
38,930 








789,066 

















35,072 






Difference added to Stock during year. 












■ 









Output of Colliery for Year . 


824,138 


16,372 













By products Fire Clay (tons) . .488. 



8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mixing. 



L 1S1 



Number of Hands 


Employed, Daily Wages 


Paid, &c 








Underground. 


Above 


Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


Xo. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


Xo. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 

Wage. 


No. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
1 >aily 
Wage. 


• 
Supervision and clerical assistance 


25 

609 

361 

53 

24 

71 

132 

273 


8 
3.50 - 10.00 
3.30- 6.00 
1.75- 3.30 
2.50- 3.50 
2.75- 3.50 
1.10- 2.20 
1.35- 2.25 
1.35- 2.25 


21 


3.50 - 6.00 


46 
609 
361 

93 

118 
93 

174 
630 

2,144 


3.50-10.00 
3.30- 6.00 








1.75- 3.30 


40 
94 
22 
42 
357 
20 

596 


2.50 - 3.00 
2.75 - 4.40 
1.00 - 2.20 
1.35 - 1.65 
1.25 - 1.75 
1.48|-1.75 


2.50- 3.50 


Mechanics and skilled labour .... 


2.75- 4.40 
1.00- 2.20 
1.35- 2.25 
1.25- 2.25 




1.481-1.75 




1,548 





































EXTENSION COLLIERY. 

Andrew Bryden, Manager. 

No. 1 or Tunnel Mine. 

William Jones, Overman. 

The only work being done at this mine is by a few men employed timbering and keeping 

the roads in repair. The mine was originally worked on the pillar and stall system, and 

during the early part of the year all the coal taken out was from pillars - , and even this work, 

as well as all development work, was suspended during the latter half of the year. 

The roads are kept up, the ventilating fan is kept going, and the mine is kept as it was when 
producing, with the object of at some future day mining the coal still remaining in the mine. 

No. 2 Mine. 
Alexander Shaw, Overman. 
This mine commences at the inner end of what is known as No. 1 or Big Tunnel, from 
which there are two levels, one to the east, and the other to the west. Overhead the west 
level, at about 100 yards in, is a continuation of No. 2 Slope, which was started outside on 
the hill, and is continued down below the west level, until it gets into a basin, when it rises 
by a slope on the opposite side, until it again comes out to the surface. About 200 yards to 
the east of the tunnel there are two other slopes, known as the new No. 2 slope and the 
Diagonal slope. This No. 2 slope is also down across the basin and up the opposite side, and 
now gives a road out that way, but it is not yet completed for traffic, though it could be used 
if required, and eventually all this district will get its air this wa}-. Much air is coming in here 
now, but it has to be regulated, or it would be so cold that the men could not work at making 
the road. The Diagonal slope, above referred to, works round the east end of the basin, and 
is now connected with the level on the opposite side, so that the three slopes referred to consti- 
tute one and the same mine. 

Much of the mining in the No. 2 slope is removing pillars ; all other work is pillar and 
stall. The coal in all these workings is very good, and for the most part has a solid conglomerate 
rock roof, which is an unusual thing for this coal. The prospect for coal here seems to be good 
for many years to come. 



L 1S2 



Report of the Minister of Mixes. 



1908 



I have examined this mine (in all its parts that it was possible to get in) frequently during 
the past year, both as regards timbering and ventilation. I always found that the timbering 
was good, with generally plenty of timber on hand. The average quantity of air passing in 
for this mine a minute was 66,000 cubic feet. There were employed in this mine 70 men and 
14 mules. I examined all the above works with a Wolf safety lamp, and it was very seldom 
that I could find a trace of explosive gas. 

No. 3 Mine, Extension. 
James Sharp, Overman to October 1st ; now, Alexander Bryden, Overman. 

This mine, at the beginning of the year, had the largest production, but now that honour 
belongs to No. 2 mine. Most of the coal now coming from No. 3 mine is from the pillars, of 
which there is a very large area ; or, in other words, about two-thirds of the original coal, and 
that in all the levels from one to seven. 

At one time all the coal was through No. 4 west level by motor to No. 1 tunnel, but a 
slant motor road was constructed, with but a slight grade against the loads going out, and by 
this slant the motor now takes the coal from the lower levels, but all the coal to the rise of No. 
•4 level comes out through that level. 

There are four openings from this mine to the surface, three of which are always open. 
The intake air-wav for this mine comes in near the face where most of the men are at work. 
The three mines might almost be considered as one mine, since they are all connected under- 
ground at various places, and all the coal goes out the same tunnel, but below the No. 4 level 
or Bi» tunnel large barriers of coal have been left between the mines, thereby defining and 
isolating each mine, so that in case of fire, or other mishap, the particular mine in which the 
mishap took place could be shut off or flooded without interfering with the other two. All the 
underground haulage in the Extension colliery, through the Big tunnel, is by electric motor, 
one motor not infrequently taking out a trip of 100 loaded cars. 

The general supervision of the mines is entrusted to Mr. Andrew Bryden, as manager, 
with overman at each mine. In addition to these, there is a staff of eight men in Nos. 2 and 
3 mines acting as firebosses and shotlighters and supervising the mine generally, under the 
instructions of the manager and overman. 

The following are the official returns of the Extension Colliery for the year ending 31st 
December, 1907 : — 



Sales axd Octpct for Year. 



Sold for consumption in Canada. . 
» export to United States . . 
„ i, other Countries 



Coal. 



Coke. 



Tons. 



267,429 

111,003 

1,821 



Total sales 



Lost in washing coal 

Used in making Coke 

n under Colliery boilers . 



32. 542 
15.914 ' 



Tons. 



Tons. 



Tons. 



380,253 



Total for Colliery use 



Stock on hand first of year 
/, last of vear. 



Difference added to stock during year 
Output of Colliery for year 



611 

5,495 



4S,456 
42S,709 



4,SS4 



433.593 



By products — Fire Clay (tons), 48S. 



8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mining. 



L 183 



Number of Hands Employed, Daily Wages Paid, etc. 



Character of Labour. 



Supervision and clerical assistance .... 
Whites — Miners 

Miners' helpers 

Labourers 

Mechanics and skilled labour 

Boys 

Japanese 

Chinese 

Hindus 



Totals . 



UNDERGROUND. 



Above Ground. 



Totals. 



No. Em- 
ployed. 



4 
44(i 
349 



Average x - 
Daily 
Wage. 



3.. 30 
2.75 



ployed. 



14 



4.9.-» 
3.30 



8 

4.-, 



•2.7 5 - 3.00 
1.10 - 2.20 



12 

42 

6 

1 

126 



Average 
Daily 

Wage. 



s 



2. 50 - 3.00 
2.75 - 4.40 
1.30 - 2.20 

1.65 
1.484- 1.75 



No. Em- 
ployed. 



S52 



20 1.484-1.75 



18 

446 

349 

12 

50 

51 

1 

126 

20 



Average 
Daily 
Wage. 



221 



1,073 



30 - 4.95 
75 - 3.30 
50 - 3.00 
75 - 4.40 
10 - 2.20 

1.65 
484-1.75 
48^-1.75 



Name of Seams or Pits — Wellington. 

Description of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, &c, and number of same — Nos. 1, 2 and 3 mines, 

with airways and levels. 
Description and length of tramway, plant, &c. — 10 miles railways and sidings; 6 locomotives ; 

196 gondola coal cars, capacity 25 tons; 150 coal cars, capacity 3 tons; 4 stationary 

engines; electric powerhouse, with 2 generators; electric tramway, with 4 locomotives; 

wharves and bunkers at Ladysmith, Oyster harbour. 



UNION COLLIERY, COMOX. 

John Matthews, Manager. 

No. 4 Mine. 

David Nellist, Overman. 

Ac. 1 Slope. 

This slope was not advanced any during the past year. No. 11 w-est level was kept going 
ahead for the first three months of the year, since when it has been at a standstill, but this 
will continue for a short time only, as the coal is good, but it is expected that a much shorter 
and better way will soon be made into this working face. There are two inclines off No. 1 1 
level, from which much coal comes through extracting of pillars. In Nos. 14 and 15 West 
levels the coal has much improved since my previous annual report, both of the above levels 
now producing first class coal. To the dip, on the north side of No. 15 level, the coal is very 
good, but at present little mining is being done here, as it is intended to take the coal out the 
proposed new haulage road already mentioned. 

Ventilation down this slope is good. In November there was 42,450 cubic feet of air a 
minute for a total of 72 men and 21 mules on one shift. 

No. 2 Slope. 

No. 2 slope branches off to the right from the No. 1 slope, a short distance after going 
underground. The bottom of this slope is the deepest workings in No. 4 mine. Some years 



L 18-i Report of the Minister of Mixes. 1908 



aero this mine was on fire, which necessitated it being filled with water, but this water has now 
been almost entirely taken out. When the water was out much of the workings were found 
to be caved, but most of the level roads are now opened and the mine is in a fair way 
to take out coal. Down this No. 2 slope they are working in Nos. 10, 11, 12, 13, and 11 
"West levels, off the slope, and on the opposite side of the slope Nos. 10, 11, 12, 13 and 11 East 
levels are being worked. Of the above levels, Nos. 10 and 11 west, and Nos. 10, 11 and 12 
East levels are extracting pillars. I will here mention that Nos. 12, 13 and 14 West levels are 
now working up towards the No. 15 west level of No. 1 slope, and will get all the coal to the 
dip of this No. 15 level, this being a much better way to work the coal, as well as a better 
way for haulage. 

A travelling road has been made through the old parallel to the slope, as well as a return 
airway through the old workings on both sides of the slope. The men and mules go down and 
up by this travelling road, so that there may be as few people as possible on the slope. The 
ventilation is good, some 32,000 cubic feet of air a minute going down to the works mentioned, 
in which, on the east and west sides, there was a total of 82 men and 13 mules. 

I have examined the above mines frequently during the past year with a Wolf safety 
lamp. Sometimes I would see a trace of explosive gas, but not much standing gas at any 
time. Brattice always is kept close up to the face. 

No. 5 Shaft. 

John Kesley, Overman. 

There has not been any work done in the lower seam here during the past year, all the 
mining being confined to the upper seam. This upper seam is 210 feet from the surface and 
350 feet above the lower seam. This upper seam coal is very hard and of good quality, but 
in some districts is very much mixed with impurities. 

At present this upper seam is limited under section 28 of the "Coal Mines Regulation 
Act," so that not more than 20 men can be employed underground at any one time, there 
being only one connection with the surface. During the past year great effort has been made 
to remove this limitation by making a connection with No. 6 shaft, which will now soon be 
accomplished, when double the number of men can be employed in this portion of the mine, as 
places are already prepared for a large number of men. 

The ventilation is very good. Air velocity, 370 x 65 = 21,050 cubic feet of air passing a 
minute where there are 19 men and six mules. I have frequently examined this mine with 
a Wolf safety lamp, and, with the exception of two different times when I got a faint showing 
of gas in my lamp, explosive gas could not be detected. 

The landing at the upper seam when the cage is away is an open shaft, except for the 
heavy iron gate, which is hung and only to be opened by the eager. In addition to the gate 
there are safety catches on the track, about 40 feet from the shaft, to catch the mine cars as 
they come out of the level, so as to prevent them getting to the iron gate or shaft. 

No. 6 Shaft, Upper Seam, 

This shaft is on the same seam as is No. 5 shaft, but is about a mile south of No. 5 shaft. 
All the working here is on the pillar and stall system, with a hard rock roof. This coal, as in 
No. 5, is very hard and formerly was blasted out of the solid, but now mining machines are 
employed to under-cut the coal before blasting. These machines do good work and give nearly 
all lump coal, while the consumption of powder and other costs of mining are materially 
reduced. 



8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mining." 



L 185 



The ventilation is very good. Air velocity, 800 x 35 = 28,000 cubic feet of air a minute 
for 19 men and 6 mules. I have frequently examined this mine with a Wolf safety lamp, and 
it is a rare thing to see a trace of explosive gas. 

The number of men in this mine is also restricted, owing to there being only one connec- 
tion with the surface, but this restriction will soon be removed, as No. 5 and No. 6 shafts are 
now only a short distance apart. The same precaution is used at the bottom of this as at the 
No. 5. A proper road is made around the end of the shaft, so that no person requires to cross 
the shaft from the one side to the other. 

No. 7 Mine. 
David Walker, Overman. 

As I have said in a previous report, this mine is about four miles in a north-westerly 
direction from No. 5 shaft and two miles from No. 4 mine. There is a standard gauge track, 
extending from the Company's railway system to the mine, where extensive sidings and other 
labour-saving appliances are provided for the handling and assorting a large output of coal. 
This mine is opened by a slope, which is now down 1,000 yards on a gentle incline ; this slope 
has been extended very little during the past year, as very much trouble has been experienced 
with faults and water, and most of the mining has been done in what is known as No. 4 east 
level. 

The coal from this mine is very hard and of good quality, and is known as the " Cumber- 
land anthracite." 

I mentioned in a previous report of a series of bore-holes having been put down, but 
nothing further has been done tow-ards proving the continuity of the coal beds. 

The ventilation is very good, 35,280 cubic feet of air passing a minute, the motive power 
being a 30 x 11 feet exhaust fan, which runs at a very low speed. In this mine there were 32 
men and 5 mules working. 

The picking table at this mine has been very much enlarged, so as to give better facilities 
for removing the rock that may come in the cars with the coal. There are times, directly after 
shot firing, when there is considerable smoke, so that rock may get into the car with the coal 
unintentionally. 

Attached are the official returns of the Union Colliery for the year ending 31st December, 
1907:— 



Sales axd OrrrrT for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 lbs.) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Sold for consumption in Canada 


195.791 
30,649 
15,908 




14,592 
220 












242,348 











14,S12 




| 64,129 
53,S80 




















118,009 
360,357 


219 
1,779 












3,247 
. 33.435 






30,188 












1,560 










Output of collierv for vear 


390,545 





16.372 



L 1S6 



Eeport of the Minister of Mines. 



1908 



Number of Haxds Employed, Daily Wages Paid, itc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


Xo. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 

Wage. 


No. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


Xo. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 




21 

163 
12 

53 

16 

26 

132 

273 


S 
3.50-10.00 
3.50- 6.00 
1.75- 2.50 
2.50- 3.00 
3.00- 3.50 
1.50- 2.00 
1.35- 2.25 
1.35- 2.25 


7 


8 
3.00 - 6.00 


28 

163 

12 

81 

68 

42 

173 

504 


$ 
3.00-10.00 
3.50- 6.00 


Mechanics and skilled labour .... 


1.75- 2.50 


28 
52 
16 
41 
231 


2.50 - 2.75 
2.75 - 3.50 
1.00 - 1.50 
1.35 - 1.50 
1.25 - 1.75 


2.50- 3.00 
2.75- 3.50 
1.00- 2.00 
1.35- 2.35 
1.25- 2.25 




696 












Totals 




375 




1,071 













Name of Seams or Pits : — No. 4 Slope, No. 5 Shaft, No. 6 Shaft, No. 7 Slope. 

Description of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, &c, and number of same : — No. 4 Slope, with air- 
ways and levels ; No. 5 Shaft, with airways and levels ; No. 6 Shaft, with airways and 
levels; No. 7 Slope, with airwaj-s and levels. 

Description and length of tramway, plant, etc.: — 20 miles railway, 4 feet 8^ inches gauge; 4 
locomotives; 150 coal cars; 1 second class passenger coach ; 5 stationary engines ; 5 
steam pumps ; 5 electric pumps ; 1 dynamo ; 1 steam saw-mill ; 1 coal washer ; 200 
coke ovens ; 2 wharves, and 1 pile-driver. 



Macgowan & Co. 
Head Office — Vancouver, B. C. 

Officers. A ddress. 

A. H. B. Macgosvan, President, Vancouver, B. C. 
John John, Superintendent, Wellington. 



GILFILLAN COLLIERY, NEAR WELLINGTON. 

John John, Manager. 

This is a new Colliery, started during the past year, and is operated by Macgow r an & Co., 
of Vancouver. This Company's propeity adjoins the western boundary of the old Adit Mine 
of Robert Dunsmuir <k Sons, now the Wellington Colliery Company. The entrance to the 
mine is by a slope driven to the north, and about two chains from the above boundary. The 
slope starts from the level but gradually inclines downwards until the coal and then the floor 
is reached, on which it continues nearly flat, the dip being to the old Wellington workings. 
The top coal is six feet thick, very good and hard, and underneath this coal is two feet of soft 
black shale, then about two feet more of coal. This lower coal is not so clean as the top coal. 
There was not any rock over the coal, but there was quite a thickness of strongly cemented 
granite. 



8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mining. 



L 1S7 



At present there are ten miners at work. All the coal has to be teamed to Wellington, 
where it is put in cars and taken to the market. 

The ventilation is good. As the coal is near the surface, a hole has been put down 
which is used as an upcast air shaft, with a fire as the motive power. 

The railway from Wellington station on the E. &. X. Railway is being extended to the 
mine, and in a short time the cars will be going to the mine. 

In several places the workings of this mine have broken through to the " Old Adit " 
workings, which are all caved, and I could not find a trace of explosive gas. 

I believe this company has also acquired the coal rights of what was at one time known 
as the West Wellington Coal Company. 

The following are the official returns of the Gilfillan Colliery for the year ending 31st 
December, 1907 : — 



Sale axd Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 lbs. ) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons 


Tons. 




2,675 














« a other countries 














2,675 






Total sales 
















138 










138 
2,813 






Total for collierv use 











• 












35 










35 






Difference added to stock during vear 














2,848 













Number of Haxds Employed, Daily Wages Paid, Etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


T0TA7S. 


Character of Labour. 


No. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


Xo. Em- 
ployed, 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


Whites — Miners ' 


1 
10 








1 
10 




s:\.:,<> 




13.50 










Labourers . . - 


2 

1 


3.00 
3.50 







2 

1 


3.00 


Mechanics and skilled labour .... 






3. 51 1 


Bovs 



























4 


12.00 


4 


2.00 












14 






18 




Totals 




4 















L 188 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 

Name of Seams or Pits : — Pit known as Gilfillan mine ; seam as Old Wellington seam. 

Description of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, etc., and number of same : — Coal seam is 9 feet 
in thickness, with band of dirt about 2 feet from bottom, that varies in thickness from 1 
to 2 feet. Top bench usually 5 feet in thickness, hard coal of good quality. Bottom 
bench has two streaks of rock that varies somewhat in thickness. Seam is worked on 
pillar and stall system, entered by means of slope dipping about 1 foot in 6 ; dip lies to 
north. The mine was started in June ; is in at end of year 350 feet. 

Description and length of tramway, plant, etc. : — Tipple is being built on north limit of 
property, with 1,000 feet of tramway from mouth of slope to same. 

Plant consists of 2 upright boilers of 13 and 20 horse-power respectively; 2 small pumps, 
capable of handling 150 gallons per minute. 

Ventilation is created by means of steam jet. 



South Wellington Coal Mines, Limited. 

Head Office— Victoria, B. C. 

Capital, $200,000. 

Officers. Address. 

John Arbuthnot, President, Victoria, B. C. 

T. O. McKay, Secretary, « 

George Wilkinson, Superintendent, Nanaimo, B. C. 



FIDDICK COLLIERY, SOUTH WELLINGTON. 
George Wilkinson, Manager. 

This is also a new colliery, having started operations on what is known as the " Fiddick " 
and " Richardson " estates, near to the old Alexandra mines of the Wellington Colliery Com- 
pany. The mine is four miles from Nanaimo, on the E. and N. Railway, and is on the seam 
of coal known as South Wellington. A tunnel goes under the E. and N. Railway into the mine, 
while a shaft 10 feet deep has been sunk to the coal, on the opposite side of the railway 
from where the tunnel comes out. After the mine is in operation this shaft will only be used 
as a ventilating shaft. 

You will see by the annual return that they have sold 575 tons of coal, which means 
considerable drifting. 

The ventilation is good. In the three shifts there are 18 miners employed. 

The prospects for coal here are good ; the seam is six feet thick and of good quality. 
There is much outside work yet to be done. 



8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mining. 



L 189 



The following are the official returns for the year 1907 : — 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coax. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2, 240 lbs.) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Sold for consumption in Canada 

« export to U. S 


575 














n a other countries 














575 






Total sales 






Used in making coke 








Used under colliery boilers, etc 















575 






Total for colliery use 






Stocks on hand first of year 






n last of year 




















Difference added to stock during year 
















Output of colliery for year 


575 






1 







Number of Hands Employed, Daily Wages Paid, Etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. Em- 
ployed. 


Average, 
daily 
wage. 


No. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
daily 
wage. 


No. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
daily 
wage. 


Supervision and clerical assistance 

Whites — Miners 


18 


1 


2 


s 


3 

18 




3.30 






Miners' helpers 








Labourers 


12 


2.75 


12 

4 


2.75 
3.00 


24 

4 




Mechanics and skilled labour .... 




Boys 








Japanese 




















3 


1.50 


3 




Indians 






















Totals 


31 




21 




52 













Name of Seams or Pits — South "Wellington. 

Description of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, etc., and number of same — One drift and one 
shaft. Upper seam about 6 feet in thickness. 



L 190 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1908 



The Vaneouver-Nanaimo Coal Mining Co., Ltd. 

Head Office — Vancouver, B. C. 

Capital, 8250,000. 

Officers. 
H. W, Maynard, President, 



Address. 
Vancouver, B. C. 



F. W. Leeson, Vice-President, 
W. R. Phillips, Secretary -Treasurer, 
J. J. Grant, Managing Director and Superintendent, 
Value of Plant, 84,000. 



NEW EAST WELLINGTON COLLIERY. 

J. J. Grant, Superintendent. 

This is another new mine which has been started to the east of the old " East Wellington 
Colliery,'" in the Mountain District only about one mile west of the City of Nanaimo, and is 
operated by the Vaneouver-Nanaimo Coal Mining Co., Ltd. 

This coal was first found on the slope of what is known as the Little Mountain, not far 
from the Rifle Butts, and is a continuation of the coal down the valley of the Millstone river, 
from Wellington and East Wellington. The coal here is of good quality, dipping towards the 
valley 60°, and in opening out, a slope is being run across the dip, going down at 40°. At 
present I cannot say much, as the work is only starting, but I think that the coal will flatten 
as they get into the valley. You will see by the returns that 156 tons of coal have been sold, 
teaming it to Nanaimo, then loading it into the cars. I expect that this mine will be able to 
give good returns at the end of the coming year. 

The following are the official returns for the year 1907 : — 



Sai.es and Output for Year. 



(Tons of 2,240 lbs.; 



Sold for consumption in Canada . . 

« export to U. S 

n n other countries 



Total sales 



Used in making coke 

Used under collierv boilers 



Total for collierv use . 



Stocks on hand first of year 
n last of year 



Difference added to stock during the year 
Output of collier}' for year 



Coal. 



Tons. 



147 



Tons. 



147 



9 
136 



15G 



Coke. 



Tons. 



Tons. 






8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mining. 



L 191 



Number of Hands Employed, Daily "Wages Paid, Etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


Xo. Em- 
ployed. 


Average, 
daily 
wage. 


No. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
daily 
wage. 


No. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
daily 
wage. 






$ 




s 




s 


Whites — Miners 


9 


3.30 






9 


















9 


2.85 


9 


























Japanese 














Chinese 






6 


1.75 


6 




Indians 














15 








Totals 


9 






24 













Name of Seams or Pits — The Wellington Seam. The New East Wellington Mine. 
Description of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, etc., and number of same — At present driving 

slope. 
Description and length of tramway, plant, etc. — Length of slope, 150 feet. 



Nicola Valley Coal & Coke Co., Ltd. 
Head Office — Vancouver, B. C. 

Capital, $1,500,000. 
Officers. A ddress. 

John Hendry, President, "Vancouver, B. C. 

"W. H. Armstrong, Vice-President and General Manager, n 

J. J. Plommer, Secretary-Treasurer, n 

Alexander Faulds, Mine Superintendent, Coutlee, B. C. 

Value of Plant, not including buildings, §50,000. 



MIDDLESBORO COLLIERY, 

Of the Nicola Valley Coal and Coke Company, Coutlee. 

Alexander Faulds, Mine Manager. 

This is also a new colliery, not mentioned in any previous reports, and although only 
recently in operation is now a producing work. This colliery is at the lower end of the 
Nicola valley and near the Coldwater river. 

No. 1 Mine. 
Hugh Gillespie, Overman. 

This mine is opened by an adit tunnel about 800 feet into the hillside, and at 550 feet it 
is intersected by a slope from Coal gully, where the coal was first discovered and where the 
company started the slope, which, after being put down 853 feet, was stopped, as they saw- 
that the coal was good and regular, having a dip about 22° and 18 feet thick. At this 
distance down the slope was stopped, knowing that it was now down to the level, at which the 
tipple would be built. 



L 192 



Report of the Minister op Mines. 



190S 



At this level an adit tunnel was started, to find the coal outcrops, and it was successful. 
This adit tunnel makes a roadway 7 feet wide and 7 feet high, inside of all timber, and inter- 
sects the slope at 550 feet from the entrance. There were only a few men working inside as 
miners, as the outside equipment was not ready to handle the coal. A large gang of men was 
put to work so as to have the tipple in operation as early as possible. The last time I was 
there the tipple was almost far enough advanced to be used. 

The natural ventilation up the Long Slope above referred to is good, but the Manager, 
Mr. Faulds, told me that it was planned to soon have a ventilating fan. 

I could not find a trace of explosive gas. 

No. 2 Mine. 
John Ovington, Overman. 

The above mine is also on the hill, similarly situated as is No. 1, but about one mile apart 
and on a higher seam. 

This tunnel is now in 1,000 feet, and at a distance from the outside of about 500 feet it 
was intersected by a slope from a higher level. This slope is 460 feet down, with a pitch of 
22°. The seam is about 6 feet thick, but of this one foot is rock, which has to be put into the 
gob. Overlying the coal is about 40 feet of sandstone rock. The coal is of a very good 
quality, clean to handle, and having a very bright black lustre. The seam is worked on the 
" long-wall " system, and when I was there it had not taken the first " break of the roof,'' 
neither did it show much weight on the timbers, but it is only a matter of time when it will 
break, when some idea can be formed as to how suitable to the seam this class of work will be. 

Ventilation was good, motive power natural, 10,500 cubic feet of air passing per minute 
for 24 men and two horses. I could not find a trace of explosive gas. 

To these mines there is a siding of about one mile long, from the Nicola Yalley branch of 
the O P. Railway. 

At No. 1 mine the tipple was almost ready for operation, with the C. P. Railway cars 
passing under to receive the coal. 

There are other seams of coal in sight, but the two mentioned are the only places where 
they are producing coal. 

The following are the official returns of this Colliery for the portion of 1907 that it was 
at work : — 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 lbs.) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 




9,712 

























9,712 
















158 










158 

9,S70 














64 
1,062 
















998 








998 












10,S68 







8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mining. 



L 193 



Xumber of Hands Employed, Daily Wages Paid, etc. 



« 


Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


Xo. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


Xo. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 

Daily 
Wage. 


Xo. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 






$ 


2 


S 
5.00-10.00 


2 

18 
8 
4 
4 


S 
5.00- 10.00 




IS 
8 


5.00 

■2.75 


5.00 


Miners' helpers 






2.75 


4 
4 


3.00 
3.30 - 5.00 


3.00 








3.30 - 5.00 




































































26 




10 




36 




Totals 















Xame of Seams or Pits — " Jewel " and " Ells " seams, Xos. 1 and 2 mines respectively. 

Description of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, etc., and number of same — " Jewel " seam of 
No. 1 mine with stope 6 feet by 6 feet by 800 feet, in coal to intersection of tunnel, and 
tunnel 9 feet wide by 7h feet high by 845 feet, 200 feet of which is in rock and the 
remainder in coal, being gangway or level. Slope dips from surface 13° to 24° at inter- 
section of tunnel. Grade of tunnel to intersection of slope 1 in 150, and therefrom to face 
in coal 1 in 200; provided with a ditch and manway. All well timbered where necessary. 

" Ells " seam of Xo. 2 mine with slope 6 feet wide by 5 feet high by 465 feet to intersection of 
main gangway or level and tunnel level or gangway to intersection of slope 460 feet by 
12 feet wide by 6 feet high, in coal, provided with ditch and manway; 100 feet of tunnel 
being timbered ; roof good. Seam dipping 24\ Grade of main gangway or level 1 in 200. 

" Jewel " seam 18^ feet. 

"Ells" n 6 „ 

Description and length of tramway, plant, etc. — Haulage by horse-power ; tramway 430 feet 
from portal to Mitchell tipple at Xo. 1 mine, with trestle 210 feet long. Haulage by 
horse-power ; tramway 530 feet from portal to Mitchell tipple at Xo. 2 mine, with trestle 
140 feet long. Tunnels and tramways laid with 30 Bis. per lineal yard steel rails. Face 
of Xo. 1 mine tunnel main gangway or level from portal in 845 feet, and Xo. 2 mine 
tunnel face in 1,170 feet from portal. • 



Diamond Vale Coal Company. 

This is a new coal company, whose south boundary is the north boundary of the 
Middlesboro Colliery's property, the coal dipping into the Diamond Vale estate from the 
Middlesboro property. The last time I was there two shafts were on the way down. Xo 1 
was down 90 feet, but was stopped for the present. Xo. 2 shaft was some distance "to the 
rise " in the rock formation, and was down 60 feet, and from boring they expect to strike coal 
at 70 feet from the surface, and I have reason to believe that good coal was found at the above 
distance down. 

I have not anything special to say in connection with this mine except that from appear- 
ances the coal seam is the same as that in the Middlesboro property. 



L 194 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1908 



EAST KOOTENAY INSPECTION DISTRICT. 

Report of Thomas Morgan, Inspector. 

I have the honour, as Inspector of Coal Mines for the East Kootenay District, to submit 
my annual report for the year 1907. The only company actually producing coal in this 
district, as yet, is the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd.. but this company is operating three 
separate and distinct collieries. 



Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd. 

Officers. Address. 

G. G. S. Lindsey, K.C., President, Toronto, Ont. 

Hon. Robt. Jaffray, Vice-President, " 

R. M. Young, Secretary, n 

E. R. Wood, Treasurer, n 

Chas. Simister, General Superintendent, Fernie, B. C. 

Capital of the Company, $3,500,000. 
The above company is now operating the following extensive collieries on the western 
slope of the Rocky mountains in the East Kootenay District, viz. : — 

Coal Creek Collieries, situated on Coal creek, about five miles from the town of Fernie, 
on a branch railway to the mines. 

Michel Collieries, situated on both sides of Michel creek, on the line of the C. P. Railway, 
being 23 miles in a north-easterly direction from Fernie. 

Carbonado Collieries, situated on Morrissey creek and connected by a branch railway 
with the C. P. Railway and the Great Northern Railway at Morrissey. The colliery is about 
14 miles from Fernie by rail, in a south-easterly direction. This colliery has been shut down 
for more than a year, but is now being opened up again. 

The total output of the Company's collieries for the past year was 876,731 tons. Of this 
322,870 tons were used in the manufacture of coke, yielding 206,541 tons, of which 5,664 tons 
were added to stock, 140,987 tons were sold for consumption in Canada, and 59,890 tons were 
exported to the United States. The coal exported to the United States amounted to 291,410 
tons, while 218,221 tons were sold for consumption in Canada. 

The amount and disposition of this combined output is more fully shown in the following 
table : — 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


• (Tons of 2,240 lbs.) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 




218,221 
291,410 




140,987 
59,890 


















509,631 












200,877 




322,870 
44,230 














367,100 
















1,339 
7,003 






876,731 
























5,664 







876,731 










206,541 









8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mining. 



L 19* 



Number of Hands Employed, etc. 



Character of Labour. 


Number Employed. 


Total 
Number 




L'nderground. 


Surface. 


Employed. 


Whites — Miners 


40 
711 
120 
200 
421 

35 


19 


59 
711 






120 


400 

340 

4 


600 




761 


Bovs 


39 


Japanese 




Chinese 
























Total 


1,527 


763 


2,290 



COAL CREEK COLLIERY. 



Robert Strachan, Manager. 



This colliery is situated on Coal Creek, about five miles east of Fernie. The following 
mines have been in operation during the year : — 

Nos. 5 and 9, on the north side of Coal creek, and Nos. 2 and 6, on the south side of the 
creek; Nos. 11 and 12 mines, about midway between Fernie and Coal creek, on north side 
of the creek. 

No. 2 Mine. 
John McClimont, Overman. 

No. 2 District in this mine has been working on the pillar and stall, with the extraction 
of pillars, and on the long-wall method, but it is now nearly all turned to long-wall work, 
and in a short time there will be nothing but this class of work. On my inspection, December 
5th, I found a little gas in No. 35 room, but it was soon cleared out ; the balance of the dis- 
trict was clear and well timbered and cogged. The ventilation is with two currents of air, 
and 110 men and 11 horses were supplied with 50,000 cubic feet a minute. 

In No. 3 District I found a little gas above the timbers in No. 17, room 4, east level, 
which was soon cleared ; the balance of the district was clear, well timbered and cogged, and 
95 men and 10 horses received 46,200 cubic feet of air a minute. Total air at fan shaft 
was 145,000 cubic feet a minute, leaving 48,800 cubic feet a minute for doors, stoppings 
and curtains. The size of the fan is 8 feet by 16 feet, making 104 revolutions a minute with 
2-inch water-gauge. No powder is used for blasting the coal in this mine. 

No. 5 Mine. 

John Hunt, Overman. 

This mine is worked on the pillar and stall system, and the extraction of pillars. The 
only blasting done in this mine is a little in the pillars in the outside part of the mine, and 



L 196 Report oe the Minister oe Mines. 1908 



nothing but "Negro" powder used and the shots fired with a battery. Locked safety-lamps are 
used exclusively ; the lamps are cleaned, filled and tested at the lamp-house before they are 
given to the men, and are again tested by the firemen as they enter the mouth of the mine. 
The General and Special Rules and a plan of the mine are posted up at the mouth of the 
tunnel, where they can be seen by the men. 

On my inspection on December 4th I found a little gas in Nos. 23, 44 and 45 stalls 
above the timber, which was soon cleared ; the balance of the mine was clear. The ventilation 
was good ; 80 men received 35,200 cubic feet of air a minute, the inside district running 28,000 
and the slope district 7,200 cubic feet a minute. Total air at fan shaft was 59,000 cubic feet 
a minute, leaving 23,800 cubic feet a minute for doors and stoppings. The size of the fan 
is 4 feet 10 inches by 14 feet, making 80 revolutions a minute. 

No. 6 Mine. 

Two parallel tunnels, one 12 feet by 7 feet and the other 14 feet by 7 feet, are being 
driven and are in about 600 feet. On my last inspection, December 6th, I found them in 
good order, well timbered right up to the face and well ventilated, 8 men receiving 10,000 
cubic feet of air a minute. The motive power is a Guibal fan, 2 feet 10 inches by 10 feet, 
•unning very slow. 

No. 9 Mine. 

David Martin, Overman. 

This mine is worked by the long-wall method. The coal is of a hard nature and of first- 
class quality, varying from 3 to 9 feet in thickness. Locked safety lamps only are used, the 
lamps being cleaned, filled, locked and tested at the lamp-house and again tested as they enter 
the mine. On my last inspection, December 3rd, I found all the mine in good order, well 
timbered and cogged and the ventilation good. In the slope district 60 men and 10 horses 
received 40,000 cubic feet of air a minute. 

In the main incline district I found a little gas in the first stall off the slant, which was 
soon cleared ; the balance of the district was clear. In this district there were 45,000 cubic 
feet of air a minute passing for the use of 70 men and 10 horses. The total air at the mouth 
of the tunnel was 110,000 cubic feet a minute, leaving 25,000 cubic feet a minute for 
leakage for curtains, doors and stoppings in the mine. 

No. 11 MiNB. 
David James, Overman. 

The tunnel at this mine is in about 1,100 feet and the counter above it. The tunnel is 
about 7 feet by 7 feet. A Guibal fan, 2 feet 10 inches by 10 feet, running very slow, was 
supplying 8 men and 1 horse with 10,000 cubic feet of air a minute. The mine is well timbered 
wherever it is considered necessary. 

No. 12 Mine. 
Frank AVilliams, Overman. 

The tunnel at this mine has been driven in about 274 feet, and is well timbered up to the 
face. The men are well supplied with air by natural ventilation. 



8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mixing. 



L 197 



The following are the official returns for the Coal Creek collieries for the year 1907 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 Rs.) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 




64,762 
291,192 




49,791 
37,708 












Total sales 





355,954 





87,499 




136,621 
29,033 

1,175 






Retailed coal 
















166,829 


















1.339 
2,615 




Stocks on hand first of year 


522,783 



















Difference added to stock during year 




1,276 














522, 7S3 









Xumber of Hands Employed, etc. (Including Fernie Coke Ovens). 



• 


Number Employed. 


Total 


Character of Labour. 


Underground. 


Surface. 


Number 
Employed. 


Supervision and clerical assistance 

Whites — Miners 


25 
4 33 


9 


34 
433 


Miners' helpers 






Labourers 


88 

250 

18 


251 

114 
4 


339 


Mechanics and skilled labour 


364 


Boys 


22 






Total 


S14 


37S 


1,192 







Xames of seams or pits : — Nos. 2, 5 and 9 seams worked this year. 

Description of seams, tunnels, levels, <irc., and number of same : — No. 6 seam still in develop- 
ment stage; Nos. 11 and 12 seams are being developed at the "Rock Cut." 
Description and length of tramway, plant, *i:c. : — Same as last year. Xo. 6 tramway completed. 



L 198 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1908 



MICHEL COLLIERY. 

James Derbyshire, Manager. 

This colliery is situated at Michel, about 24 miles in a north-easterly direction from Fernie. 
The following mines have been in operation during the year : Nos. 3, 4 and 5 on the south- 
west side, and No. 8 on the north-east side of Michel creek. 

No. 3 Mine. 

Joseph Thomas, Overman. 

This mine is worked on the pillar and stall method. The only explosive used in blasting 
the coal is "Negro" powder and the shots are fired with a battery. On my last inspection, 
December 11th, I found everything in the mine in good order and the timbering and ventilation 
all that could be desired. For the use of 67 men and 3 horses, 30,000 cubic feet of air a 
minute was passing. 

This mine is worked exclusively with locked safety lamps, and the lamps are cleaned, filled 
and tested before being given to the men, and again tested before they are allowed to enter the 
mine. The General and Special Rules and a plan of the mine are posted up at the mouth of 
the tunnel, in view of all the miners entering the mine. 

No. 4 Mine. 

Joseph Thomas, Overman. 

This mine has just resumed work, after being stopped for a long time. On my inspection, 
December 11th, I found everything in good order. This mine has a good roof and needs 
but very little timbering. The ventilation was good, 10 men receiving 35,000 cubic feet of 
air a minute. Total air at fan shaft was 100,800 cubic feet a minute. One fan ventilates 
both Nos. 3 and 4 mines. The workmen in No. 3 mine received 30,000 cubic feet a 
minute, which shows a leakage of 35,800 cubic feet a minute through doors and stoppings. 

No. 5 Mine. 

Joseph Thomas, Overman. 

On my last inspection of this mine, December 10th, I found a little gas over the timbers 
in No. 4 room on the east side, and had it removed ; the balance of the mine was clear and 
well timbered and the ventilation good. This mine is worked by the pillar and stall method 
and "Negro" powder is the only explosive permitted for blasting the coal, and the shots are 
fired with a battery. The mine is damp all over. On the west side, 35 men and 3 horses 
were supplied with 20,000 cubic feet of air a minute, and on the east side 25,000 cubic feet a 
minute was supplied for the use of 65 men and 3 horses. The total air at the fan shaft was 
50,000 cubic feet a minute, leaving 5,000 cubic feet a minute leakage for doors and stoppings. 
The size of the fan is 4 feet by 10 feet, running at a speed of 100 revolutions a minute. 

No. 8 Mine. 

John Bastian, Overman. 

In this mine there are two separate districts, No. 5 incline district and No. 3 incline 
district. The mine is worked by the pillar and stall method, and on my last visit, December 
12th, I found all the stalls and levels were timbered and the ventilation good. For the use of 
70 men and 8 horses working in No. 5 incline district, 23,900 cubic feet of air a minute was 
passing. No powder is used in this district. 



8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mining. 



L 199 



On my last inspection of No. 3 incline district, on December 13th, I found the mine well 
timbered and ventilated and everything in good order. All the blasting done in this district 
is done at night, and nothing but " negro " powder used, the shots being fired with a battery. 
There were 41,600 cubic feet of air a minute passing for the use of 70 men and 13 horses 
employed in this district. The total air at the fan shaft was 72,600 cubic feet a minute, 
leaving 7,100 cubic feet per minute for leakage through doors and stoppings. 

The following are the official returns of this colliery for the year 1907 : — 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 Its. ) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Sold for consumption in Canada 


150,500 

218 




91,196 
22 182 

















150,718 










113,378 




186,249 
15,192 

1,569 






















Total for collier}' use 


203,010 
353,728 












n last of year 






4,3S8 












Difference added to stock during year 




4,3S8 






353,728 








117,766 











Number of Hands Employed (Including Coke Ovens), Daily Wages Paid, etc., 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


Supervision and Clerical Assistance . . . 


14 
244 
120 
112 
165 

17 
• 




10 




24 
244 
120 
261 
389 

17 










Miners' helpers 












149 

224 













Boys 












































Totals 


672 




383 




1,055 













Names of Seams or Pits : Nos. 3, 4, 5 and 8 mines working. 

Description of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, etc., and number of same : Same as last year. 
Description and length of tramway, plant, etc. : Same as last year. Two new Erie city 
return tubular boilers installed. 



L 200 



Report of the Minister of. Mines. 



ISO* 



CARBONADO COLLIERY. 
Evan Evans, Manager. 

The company has started to open up mines at Carbonado again. Two new tunnels have 
been started on the upper side of the tipple and level with it. They were progressing slowly 
with the work, owing to being bothered with the gumboo sliding down on them all the time. 
In all 42 men were employed. 

The following are the official returns of this colliery for the year 1907 : — 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 lbs. ) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Sold for consumption in Canada 


215 
















« i, other countries 














215 






Total sales 
















5 








5 
220 


























































220 













Number of Hands Employed, Daily Wages Paid, Etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
daily 
wage. 


No. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
daily 
wage. 


No. Em- 
ployed. 


Average 
daily 
wage. 


. 


1 
34 








1 
34 






































6 




2 




8 




































































Totals 


41 




o 




43 













Name of Seams or Pits : Colliery continued closed until May, 1907, when Nos. 7 and 8 seams 

were prospected. Development work is still being carried on. 
Description of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, &c, and number of same : Two main tunnels are 

being driven now towards Nos. 7 and 8 seams, but are not yet in coal. 
Description and length of tramway, plant, &c. : Same as last year. 



8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mining. 



L 201 



Hosmer Tunnels, Hosmer. 
December the 9th I inspected the Hosmer tunnels and found everything in good order. 
The tunnels are timbered with 12-inch by 14-inch timbers, and the size of the tunnels is 16 
feet by 8^ feet and 22 feet by 8| feet, respectively. These tunnels are in over 2,000 feet. 
For the use of 100 men on the shift, all told, there were 11,000 cubic feet of air a minute, 
passing through the tunnels. 



ACCIDENTS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA COLLIERIES DURING 1907. 





Name of Colliery. 










Causes of Accident and Nature 
of Injury. 


Nanai- 
mo. 


Union. 


Ex ten- 
sion. 


Fid- 
dick. 


Van. & 
Nanai'o 

Coal Co. 


Middles- 

boro. 


Crow's 
Nest. 


Hosmer 


Total f 
1907. 




~~P. 

r. 


Eg 



~ 


— 

ic 

x 


y 


3 

O 

x 


43 

a 

bf 

x 


y. 
i 


'- 
o 

1 

;; 


% 

u 

X 

13 
3 
1 


~ 


X 


— 
be 

X 


y. 




1 
x 




O 

X 

1 


% 

X 

1 


]3 

- 

3 


o 

6 
3 


si 

X 

2 


y 



'^- 
X 

1 


2 
Sac 

X 

2 


y 
i 

8 
2 


.2 
tn 

J 

15 
7 


2 

X 

18 
7 
8 


"3 
o 
H 


Fatal 


20 


















Slight 






1 
4 


2 


4 

2 


•J 


i 

i 






2 


2 


30 


Slight 






Fatal 


1 




17 






Slight 






4 












45 


Fatal . . 








1 


4 






l 


4 












1 








7 
1 


9 


2 
1 








8 

1 


22 
2 


is 

4 








8 


':- 




Slight 






Fatal 






7 






1 


1 






1 




l 


i 






















Slight 






Fatal 






3 




























































Slight 






1 












l 
























1 












3 




Fatal 






5 


















l 
























3 

1 

e 

28 


1 


3 

3 


i 

2 


■1 


1 

10 

31 


4 

1 

9 
61 


i 

4 

2 
62 




Slight 






1 


1 










Fatal 






6 












Slight 






1 








i 


l 

s 


23 






1 
1 


.. 




1 




1 

2 


1 

i 

3 


5 

l(i 




Fatal 


1 




21 






Slight 






1 

2 2 


4 


in 


3 


4 




Total 


4 


11 


154 







L 202 



Report of the Minister of Mixes. 



1908 



X 

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I— I 
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s 


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45 




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P-. 


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8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mining. 



L 203 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF ACCIDENTS IN B. C. COLLIERIES DURING 1907. 

CROW'S NEST COLLIERIES. 
Reported by Thomas Morgan, Inspector. 



No. 


Colliery. 


Date. 


Name. 


Occupation. 


Details. 


1 


Coal Creek.... 


Jan. 14 


Thomas Glover .... 


Switchboy 


While attending to the latches was 
struck in the leg by the rope. 


2 


Coal Creek .... 


29 


Martin Kubrick . . . 




While riding on the side of the car 






he was jammed against the door 
frame and had his hip bone broken. 


3 


Michel 


29 


G. Pagorri 


Back-hand 


Was unloading timber from a car 
when a piece swung round and 
struck a post that supported one of 
the cross beams, which fell on 
Pagorri and crushed him. The 
doctor examined him and could find 
no injury,, but he died 36 hours 
afterwards. 


4 


Coal Creek .... 


Feb. 7 






Leg broken by a piece of coal falling 
from the face. 






5 


Coal Creek .... 


8 


Thomas Cowan .... 


n 


Leg broken by a falling clod. 


6 


Coal Creek .... 


8 




Car repairer 


While Douglas was working in the 
car-shop at Coal Creek a snow- 
slide broke down the building and 
smothered him. 


7 


Coal Creek .... 


9 


George Trill 


Boilerman 


Jumped oh a train in the yard 
while it was in motion, missed his 
hold, and was run over and killed 
by one of the coaches. 


8 


Coal Creek .... 


11 


Thomas Cronin .... 




Was travelling fast with a bunch of 
cars and got his legs cut by being 
pinched between two of them when 
they stopped. 






9 


Coal Creek .... 


13 


John Riley 


Brusher 


Shoulder dislocated and one rib 
broken by a piece of clod which 
struck him while he was breaking 
a piece of rock. 


10 


Coal Creek .... 


19 


Steiner Rockasby . . 




While taking out an old piece of tim- 
ber was struck by a sharp piece of 
rock, which took off his right 
thumb. 




11 


Coal Creek .... 


March 4 






A piece of timber that he was taking 
off a car fell on his right leg, break- 
ing a small bone. 




12 


Coal Creek .... 


16 


Paul Gall 




Right arm fractured by a piece o 
timber on top of an empty car, 
which was coming into the room 
where Gall was. 






13 


Coal Creek .... 


29 


Martin Smolick . . . 




Had just hitched his mule to a car 
when it started suddenly and Smo- 
lick was caught between the car 
and a post near the road and was 
killed. He had been warned to 
stand on the other side of the car. 



L 204 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1908 



Accidents in Crow's Xest Collieries. — Continued. 



No. 




Coal Creek . 



Coal Creek. 



Michel 



Coal Creek. 

Michel 

Michel 

Hosmer. . . . 
Coal Creek. 
Hosmer. . . . 



Coal Creek. 



,- Coal Creek . 



Coal Creek. 



Coal Creek. 



Date. 



April 4 



13 

May 15 
17 

20 

28 

June 9 

12 

18 



_'l 



July 9 




John Piasta Slate pieker. 



Archibald Xelson . . 



Fred Kubalo 



S. W. Green 



Driver and hoist- 
[man 



Switchboy 



Robert Grant 



Ernest Deluca. 



Peter Lemanha. 



Thomas Wright . . . 



Fred Taylor , 



Mike Kubic. 



r James Hepple . . 
I Robert Thomas . 
I Edward Best . . . 
LJohn Edmonson. 



Martin Bobrowsky. 



Andrew Gillie 



Machinist helper 



Back-hand 



Rope-rider , 



Labourer 



Trackman 



Foreman . 



Driver . 



Rope-rider . 



Miner 



Details. 



Leg broken by an empty car coming 
down the switch-back by the tipple 
where he was standing. 

Jammed between two cars at the 
bottom of a lift and injured inter- 
nally. 

Had given the signal for the loaded 
cars to come out but had failed to 
throw the switch. He ran on to 
the empty track, where he was fol- 
lowed by the cars, run over, and 
killed. 

While carrying a pipe along the main 
level stumbled and broke his ankle. 

Leg broken by being caught between 
a car and the side. 

Was killed at the bottom of a slope 
by a trip of trucks which broke 
away above him, through the cotter 
pin pulling out of the " kick off." 

While at work in the main tunnel a 
piece of rock fell on him, breaking 
his leg. 

While walking behind a horse it 
kicked him in the pit ,of the 
stomach. 

A fall of coal from the roof set free 
some gas, which was ignited by 
Taylor's naked light and slightly 
burned his face and hands. 

Was bringing a trip of three cars to 
the landing, sitting on the front end 
of the first car. The trapper 
opened the door and told him to 
slacken up speed, when Kubic, for 
some nnknown reason, jumped oft 
and was fatally crashed between 
the car and the door-post. 



Killed. 
Fatally injured 



These four men were 
driving a prospect 



Badly bruised. J lighted a couple of 
shots had retired outside. It is 
supposed that the explosion of 
these detonated some dj-namite at 
the mouth of the tunnel, with the 
results above mentioned. 

The car that he was riding on was 
carrying a stick of timber which 
was caught by the side and fell off, 
carrying Bobrowsky with it and 
breaking his leg. 

Leg broken below the knee by a piece 
of coal falling from the face. 



8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mining. 



L 205 



Accidents in Crow's Nest Collieries. — Continued. 



No. 


Collier}-. 


Date. 


Name. 


Occupation. 


Details. 


30 


Coal Creek .... 


July 22 






A "bump" occurred and the room 
that Bell was standing in caved in. 
When found he was dead, evidently 
suffocated. 




31 


Coal Creek .... 


Aug. 3 


Thomas Dewsbury 




Right leg broken by a post while he 
wps letting down a car, with a 
McGinty. 




32 


Coal Creek .... 


17 


Joseph Cocceolone . 




While preparing the roof for a set of 
timber the roof collapsed, through 
three other sets breaking. Cocceo- 
lone had his skull fractured and 
the top of one ringer cut off. 


33 


Coal Creek .... 


19 


Sidney Rees 


Trapper 


Attempted to jump on to a moving 
train of cars on the surface and had 
his leg badly gashed. 


34 


Coal Creek .... 


a 27 


Albert Rhodes 


Driver 


A loaded tram jumped the track and 
struck a piece of timber which 
Rhodes was helping to handle, 
causing it to swing around and 
break his leg. 


35 


Coal Creek .... 


23 


Albert Hoston 


Rope-rider 


In attempting to jump on to the front 
bumper of a trip of loaded cars he 
slipped and fell, was run over and 
fatally injured. 


36 


Michel 


29 




Box car loader . . 


Killed while •standing in the yard by 
a piece of stump blown from some 
excavation work a hundred yards 
away. 


37 


Coal Creek .... 


Sept. 9 


David Lynn 


Driver 


Lynn was riding on the front of his 
car when his horse stepped on 'a 
piece of wood, which flew up and 
struck his foot, badly bruising it 
and breaking a bone. 


38 


Hosmer 


11 


M. Durrant 




Burned about the face and hands by 
igniting some gas in the upper por- 
tion of a cross-cut. 




39 


Coal Creek .... 


20 


Peter Johnson .... 




Fatally injured by the premature ex- 
plosion of a charge. 


40 


Coal Creek .... 


20 


John Debattista. . . 




Head injured by the explosion men- 
tioned in No. 39. 






41 


Coal Creek .... 


Oct. 2 


Thomas Wilson . 




Fatally injured by the fall of an over- 
hang of coal which he was mining 
under. He had neglected to put in 
sprags, though warned to do so. 






42 


Coal Creek .... 


9 






Killed by a "bump " occurring in the 
place where he was working, bring- 
ing down coal. 






43 


Coal Creek .... 


16 


Luigi Basile 


Pusher on tipple . 


Two toes taken off by a loaded trip of 
cars which he was jumping on to 
when he missed his hold and fell, 
catching his foot in the creeper 
guard. 



L 206 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1908 



No. 



44 



45 
46 
47 

48 



49 
50 

51 

52 

53 

54 

55 
56 

57 

58 



Colliery. 



Accidents in Crow's Nest Collieries. — Concluded. 



Coal Creek . 

Hosmer 

a .... 
// .... 

Michel .... 
Coal Creek. 

Coal Creek. 

Coal Creek. 

Michel 

Michel 

Michel 
Michel 

Coal Creek. 

Coal Creek. 



Date. 



Name. 



Nov. 8; John Laithwaite 



11 E. Montalbetti 

11 J. Maternik 

11 G. Oniski 

11 F. Toffolutti 



11 



13 



15 



George Wagstaff. 



Humphrey Evans. 



Occupation. 



Miner 



Details. 



While Laithwaite was loading a car 
part of the coal broke away and 
fell on him, breaking his leg below 
the knee. 



Labourer 



Miner .... 
Rope -rider 



James White Miner 



« 15' Alfred Chisholm . 



Driver . 



18 Joe Symatuck .... Backhand 



27 

Dec. 12 
13 

12 

28 



Joe Kubasick 

John Turisk . 
W. Sherrocks 



William Smith 



Andros Williams. 



Spragger . 



Backhand . 
Miner 



Flag boy . 



Miner 



"\ Were employed in 
a railway cutting 
clearing out an 



Killed. 

Killed. 

Killed. 

Severely injured. J old hole when a 
charge at the bottom exploded, with 
the results shewn. Toffolutti had 
his shoulder bruised, left side 
ruptured, and face and neck cut. 

Collar bone broken by a fall of top 
coal. 

Was shifting a switch with his hand 
when one of the cars ran over it, 
taking off two of his fingers. 

While working at the face some rock 
fell on him, dislocating his knee 
and straining his back. 

While stepping on to a moving car 
he was caught against some timbers. 
He had one rib broken and chest 
and shoulder crushed. 

While walking down a slope the trip 
of cars above him broke away. 
Symatuck was struck and fatally 
injured by a piece of timber falling 
off one of the cars. 

Was pushing a car by the side when 
his coat caught and he M-as dragged 
under the car, receiving a broken 
leg. 

Head cut and leg broken by a fall of 
rock. 

Was pulling down coal when a loose 
piece fell on his hand, crushing it 
badly. 

Flagging trips at entrance to No. 9 
Mine, foot caught in switch, causing 
him to fall, fracturing his leg. 

Leg broken and back lamed while at 
work in his stall in No. 9 Mine. 



8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mining. 



L 207 



COAST COLLIERIES. 
Reported by Archibald Dick, Inspector. 



No. 


Colliery. 


Dale. 


Name. 


Occupation. 


Details. 


1 




Jan. 13 


Thos. Munsie 




Killed in his working place by a fall 
of top coal. 


2 




17 


Benj. Evans 




Severely burnt on the hands and face 






by an explosion of gas while going 
into another working place. 


3 


" 


18 


Martin Dunsmuir. . 




Foot slightly bruised by a piece of 






coal rolling on it. 


4 




18 


Wm. McEwan .... 




Muscles of leg sprained by a car, his 
foot having got caught in the switch 
when sending the car away. 


5 




lit 


Thos. Morrison 


Coal loader 


Squeezed around the back and hips 
by a small fall of top coal, while at 
work. 


fi 




29 






Fatally injured by a fall of top coal 






while at work in his stall, and died 
about 13 hours afterwards. 


7 




25 




Bratticeman .... 


Burned on the face and hands by an 
explosion of gas while putting up 
a brattice. 


8 




25 




Miner 


Burned on the face and hands by an 






explosion of* gas, at same time as 
Mahaffy. 


q 




n 25 


Frank Berto 




Burned on the face and hands by an 






explosion of gas, with Mahaffy. 


10 


Nanaimo , 


Feb. 5 






Fatally injured by a fall of top coal 






while at work in his stall. 


n 




13 


Wong Chong 




Knocked block out from in front of 






car, did not stand clear, and was 
run over. Hip dislocated and 
injured. 


12 


Nanaimo 


27 


Saml. Brighton 


Machine helper. . 


Little finger broken by a falling lump 
of coal. 


13 




27 






The car that he was taking out ran 






away and went off the track, 
squeezing him against the roof, 
bruising him and cutting his 
fingers. 


14 




Mar. 13 


Joe Lepatish 




Hips squeezed by being caught 
between loaded car and prop. 






15 


Nanaimo 


21 


A. Cunningham . . . 


Miner 


Kneecap injured by a falling piece of 
coal. 






16 




21 






Attempted to jump on to a passing 
coal train on surface, but missed his 
hold, fell among the wheels and 
was fatally injured. 


17 




April 5 


J. Cloke 


Miner 


Leg broken and head cut while at 
work in his stall. 






% 



L 208 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1908 



Accidents in t Coast Collieries. — Continued. 



No. 

18 
19 

20 
21 

22 
23 
24 

25 

26 

27 
28 
29 
30 

31 

32 
33 

34 



Colliery. Date. 



Union 
Extension. 



Nanaimo . 



Extension. 



Middlesboro 



Nanaimo . 



Extension. 



Union 



Extension . . . 
Middlesboro 

Union 

Extension. . . 



Union 



Nanaimo . . 
Extension. 

Nanaimo . . 



April 15 
18 

28 
30 



Name. 



Jung Kum 

Peter Whiskers 

Fred Hilley 



Occupation. 



Miner 



John Constantine . . 



30 John Gracomo . 



May 11 
14 
18 

23 

April 29 

June 24 

29 

July 9 



Alex. Strang 



John Hill . 



Martin Varnetta 



John Jones . . . 
Robert Boyd. 
— Matsuda . 
J. Pogerly . . . 



13 W. Potter 



Loader 



Miner 



Labourer 



Wm, Thompson . . . Miner 



Harry Domergue . . 
James Conlin 



Anton Domino Car coupler 



Details. 



Leg broken by a piece of coal falling 
on him while mining. 

Slightly burned about the arms by an 
explosion of gas ignited by a naked 
light which he was using, although 
supplied with a safety lamp. 

Slightly cut on the arms by the piece 
of coal, that he was mining, falling 
on him. 

Slightly burned about the face and 
shoulders b\ r an explosion of gas 
ignited by a naked light brought in 
by his partner. 

Slightly burned about the face and 
shoulders at the same time as Con- 
stantine. 

Cut his foot severely with an axe 
while clearing the right of way for 
a railway on surface. 

Bruised about the shoulders, while 
wi irking in his stall, by a piece of 
rock falling from the roof. 

Fatally injured by a fall of rock in 
his stall. He had tired a shot in 
the top rock, which failed to bring 
it down, and continued working in 
below it until it fell upon him. 

Slightly burnt about the face and 
hands and part of the back, by the 
explosion of some gas which had 
accumulated in a stall where the 
brattice curtain had been pulled 
down by a mine car. 

' Small bone of fore-arm broken by the 
fall of a piece of coal. 

Right arm accidentally lacerated by 
his partners pick. 

Leg broken by a piece of middle rock 
falling where he was working. 

Got burned about the hands by 
igniting some blasting powder while 
working in the mine. 

Had two ribs broken, hips injured, 
and received wounds on scalp and 
chin by a piece of rock falling on 
him while in his stall. 

Foot bruised by a falling piece of coal. 

Leg broken by a timber which he was 
helping to take it off a mine car. 

Collar bone broken by a loaded car 
bumping into the cars that he was 
coupling. 



8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mining. 



L 209 



Accidents in Coast Collieries. — Continued. 



Colliery- 



Union 



Nanaimo . . 
Extension. 

Nanaimo. . 
Extension. 



Nanaimo. 



Union 
Extension . 



Middlesboro 
Nanaimo . . . 



Union 



Nanaimo . 



Extension . 



Extension 



Date. 



July 



17 
19 

26 

Aug. 1 



Sept. 



Name. 



Wong Sing 

Dang We Chung . . . 



Occupation. 



Miner 

Rope-rider . 



Jim Wing I Car-dropper. 

Mike Kesto ' Driver 



Sing Yen . . . 
Wavau Sing 



Thomas Gordon. 

Arthur Warring. 
J. W. Perry 



Full Car 

Moses Daniels . . 

Edward Wood . 
Walter Pryde. . 

Y. Matsumoto . 

Edward Devlin. 



J. Privid^t. 



]-2 



Labourer 



Miner 



Chargeman 
Motor conductor 



Mine helper, 
Miner 



Mucker 

Miner . 



Shot-lighter. 



J. Koli 

A. Koli 

M. Wargo 

J. Byaski 

A. Robertson 
Gilbert Inkster . 



Mule driver. 



Miner 

n 

Track-layer 

Miner 



Details. 



Seriously crushed by a fall of coal. 

Killed by falling off a car as it came 
to the outside of the mine. 

Slightly squeezed between two cars 
on surface. 

The sprag of a car broke and Kesto 
stepped in front to stop it, thereby 
bruising his leg. 

Killed by a car while crossing the 
railway, on surface. 

Arm fractured by a passing car while 
Sing was crossing the railway track 
on surface. 

While helping the pusher with a car 
his hand was jammed between the 
side and the car and he was severely 
bruised. 

Foot bruised by the drilling machine 
falling on it. 

The car he was riding in got off the 
track and tipped up on end. Perry 
could not get clear and had his knee- 
cap put out. 

Was slightly burned about the face 
and hands by igniting some gas. 

Was lowering a mine car when the 
prop pulled out, striking him on the 
head and bruising it. 

Head cut by a falling piece of rock. 

Twisted his ankle and broke a small 
bone of his leg while getting out of 
the way of a piece of falling rock. 

Got entangled with the rope while 
lowering a car and received a com- 
pound fracture of the leg. 

The loader failed to tell him that the 
face-man had fired shots, so Devlin 
was near the explosion and got 
bruised about the face and eyes. 

While helping a miner to load a car 
a piece of coal fell off the rib and 
broke his leg. 

Burned about the face and hands by 
the explosion of some gas which 
had accumulated in the heading 
where Koli was working. The men 
were provided with safety lamps, 
but one of their number lit a 
naked light, thinking that he 



L 210 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1908 



Accidents in Coast Collieries. — Continued. 



No. 


Colliery. 


Date. 


Name. 


Occupation. 


Details 












could do so safely, as the face 
where he was had been worked only 
an hour beforehand. The accumu- 
lation was probably caused by a 
broken curtain. 


57 




Sept. 19 


Charles Bardrick . . 












in the cog wheel of the electric 
pump that he was attending. 


58 


Nanaimo 


20 


J. W. Graham .... 


Miner 


Had fired a shot which failed to bring 
down but loosened the coal. As he 
was working on the coal the naked 
light he was carrying kindled some 
gas that had collected in the cavity 
and he got burnt on the hands, fore- 
arm, face and back of the neck. 






59 




23 


Louis Perry 




Was caught between two cars that 
had been shunted on to the wrong 
track and bruised about the knees. 


60 




30 


Geo. Richardson . . . 


Brusher 


Small bone of leg broken by a mine 
car that jumped the track as it was 
passing him. 






61 




Oct. 11 


Pasqual Maucine . . 


Pusher 


Feet injured by a mine car which 
overtook him on the track. 






6<? 


" 


14 


James Moore 




Body squeezed by a loaded car which 
he had attached to the haulage 
rope. 






63 


Extension 


14 


James Grossman . , . 


Pusher 


Leg broken by a stringer which rolled 
off a car while Grossman was un- 
loading lumber. 






64 


Middlesboro . . 


» 15 






Toes of right foot crushed by a piece 
of rock falling while he was at 
work. 






65 




16 


John Myers . 




Both legs broken by the premature 
ignition of a shot. 






66 




17 






Shoulder caught between two cars 
that he was coupling and collar- 
bone broken. 


67 




21 


Richard Varheds . . 


Mule driver 


Fell from the bumper in front of a 
loaded trip of cars. Had two ribs 
broken and a knee bruised. 


68 


« 


22 


Neil Bo water 


Miner 


Was putting a prop under a rock 
when it fell, breaking his nose and 
bruising him generally. 






69 




a 25 


Thomas Simpson . . 




Ankle sprained by a car running off 
the track. 


70 




25 


Thomas McMullan . 




Was standing near a slope rope when 
it slipped off the pulley, striking 
him and bruising his leg. 


71 




31 




Miner's helper . . . 


Fatally injured by the fall of a large 
piece of top coal, while he was at 
work in his stall. 



8 Ed. 7 



Coal Mining. 



L 211 



Accidents in* Coast Collieries. — Continued. 



No. 


Colliery 


Date. Name. 


Occupation. 


Details. 


7fl 




Nov. 1 






Was riding up an incline in a mine 
car when it went off the track, 
turned over and broke his arm. 






73 


Fiddick . 


// 5 W. H. Moore 


Miner 


Finger hurt by a hammer. 


74 









Squeezed by a piece of rock, that he 
was working to get down, falling 
on him. 


75 


Nanaimo 


„ 


Sam Orr, Jr 


Doorkeeper 


While attempting to take a sprag out 
of a car wheel he fell and the wheel 
took off one of his fingers. 


76 





11 


Thomas Johnson. . . 




Foot crushed by a falling piece of 
rock while he was at work. 


77 




// 16 Euneo Benoffi 

1 




Killed by a rock which fell on him 
while he was getting a place ready 
to put up timber. 


78 




1 




Squeezed between a car and a prop 
while unhooking a mule from the 
car. 


79 


Middlesboro . . 


19 


James Edwards . . . 


Labourer 


Two toes of right foot broken by 
standing too near a tipple. 


80 




26 


Joseph Nixon . ... 




Back bruised by a piece of coal fall- 
ing off the rib while he was loading 
a car. 


81 




Dec. 7 


Alex. Barshk 




An explosion of gas slightly burnt his 
hands and made him fall off the 
bottom coal, dislocating his shoul- 
der. 


82 




// 7 


Mike Mercanich . . . 


Loader 


Fatally burned by a gas explosion. 
The place where Mercanich was 
working had been examined by a 
fireman only a few minutes before, 
but no trace of gas was discovered. 


83 


Nanaimo 


n 7 


James Cook 




Was using a rail to drive out a prop 
and get some rock down. When 
the rock came down it struck the 
rail, which hit Cook's leg, inflicting 
a flesh wound. 


84 




n 7 


Samuel Miller 




Fractured his ankle by stumbling 
against some cars which were in 
motion. 


S5 


V. & N. Col. Co. 


9 


Joseph Randle .... 


Manager in 

[charge 


Bruised by a passing car. 


86 


Nanaimo 


a 11 


William Cook 


While Cook was making up a shot of 
dynamite the caps, for some un- 
known reason, exploded, blowing off 
his left arm and putting out his left 
eye. 


87 




12 


John Anderson .... 




While Anderson was spragging a car 
a piece of coal fell from the side and 
squeezed him against the ear, break- 
ing several ribs. 



L 212 



Report of the Minister of. Mines. 



1908 



Accidents in Coast Collieries. — Concluded. 



No. 


Colliery. 


Date. 


Name. 


Occupation. 


Details. 


88 




Dec. 12 




Miner 


Leg broken by a piece of top coal, 
which he was pulling down. 






89 


Extension 


23 


Joseph Lepatich . . . 




Back bruised by a piece of coal rolling 
off the top bench. 






qo 


Union 


23 


Andrew Bogo 




Burned on the face and neck by the 
premature explosion of a shot. 






91 




24 






Killed while at work in his stall by a 
fall of top coal. 


qo 


Extension 


28 


George Keserieh . . . 




Leg broken by a piece of top coal that 
he had pulled down rolling on it. 






93 


Nanaimo 


30 


William Larney . . . 




Had his foot caught between some 
points which were closed by a car 
moving on them. The car broke 
his leg before it could be stopped. 


94 




June 12 


Finley McRae 


Mule driver ... . 


Three fingers crushed by the wheels 
of a car that he was spragging. 


9=> 





12 


Charles Clements . . 




Collar-bone caught between two cars 
that he was coupling, and broken. 






96 




July 2 












him, breaking his leg. 



8 Ed. 7 



Metalliferous Mines Shipping in 1907. 



L 213 



METALLIFEROUS MINES SHIPPING IN 1907. 



FORT STEELE MINING DIVISION. 



Mine or Group. 


Locality. 


Owner or Agent. 


Address. 


Character of Ore. 


North Star 

Pav Roll 

St. Eugene 

Sullivan 


Kimberley 

Kimberley .... 


North Star Mining Co., Ltd ... 

Maurice Quain 

Con. M. & S. Co. of Canada 

Sullivan Group Mining Co 


Movie 


Lead, silver. 
Silver, gold. 
Lead, silver. 



GOLDEN AND WINDERMERE MINING DIVISIONS. 



Black Diamond 

Charlernont 

Comstock 

Tecumseh and Pay- 
master 



Toby Creek 

North Fork Toby Creek . 
McDonald Creek 



J. Lake [ Athalmere . . 

J. C. I'it t ~ Windermere 

Geo. M. Willard Wilmer .... 

Wm. Haupt i 



Lead, silver. 



S;h er, lead. 



NELSON MINING DIVISION. 







Hall M. & S. Co 

Hastings (B. C.) Explor. Sy., Ltd 














Double Standard and 


Porcupine Creek 

Eagle Creek 

Hall Creek 


Hall M. & S. Co 












The Fern Gold M. ^c M. Go 








" 




salmo 

Kokauee Creek 


Frank Finnev 

Bell Bros 

La Plata Mines. Ltd 

J. C. Devlin 


Erie 


La Plata 










Sheep Creek 










Nugget 




Geo. T. Matthews 

Duncan United Mining Co 


Williams Siding 


Queen 

Second Relief 


Erie 

Toad Mountain 


Hall M. &S. Co ...: 

D. Grobe 

Ymir Gold Mines, Ltd . 












Yankee Girl 

















Silver, copper. 
Gold, silver. 
Copper, gold, silver. 

Silver, gold. 
Lead, silver. 
Gold, silver, copper. 
Gold, silver. 
Copper, silver. 
Gold, silver, lead. 
Gold, silver. 
Silver, lead. 
Copper, silver. 
Gold, silver. 
Gold, silver, copper. 
Gold, silver, 
Gold, silver, copper. 
Gold, silver. 

Silver, copper. 
Copper, silver, gold. 

- :ver. 
Gold, silver, lead. 



A1NSWORTH MINING DIVISION. 





North Fk. Woodbury Ck. 
South Fork Kaslo Creek. 


H. J. Wright 






Black Diamond .... 


Ainsworth 


Silver 
Silver 
Silver 
Silver 
Silver 


lead. 


Emerald Hill 


Bank of B. N. A 






Bear Lake 

Ainsworth 

South Fork Kaslo Creek. 


Whitewater 

Ainsworth 










Flint 

Gallagher 


A. D. Wheeler 




Krao Silver-Lead Mining Co 


• 


Libbv 








Kaslo 










Ainsworth 


G. H. Barnhart 


















Spokane-Trinket 

Whitewater Deep . . 





























L 214 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1908 



SLOCAN MIXING DIVISION. 



Mine or Group. 



Adams Group 

American Boy 

Arlington 

Buffalo 

California & Clipper. 

Canadian Group 

Colonial 

Elkhorn 

Emily Edith 

Forget 

Hartney Group 

Hewitt and Lorna 

Doone 

Idaho-Alamo 

Jo-Jo 

Last Chance 

Lone Batchelor 

Lucky Jim 

Majestic 

McAllister 

Midnight Fraction . . 
Molly Hughes .... 

Monte Christo 

Mountain Boomer . . 

Mountain Con 

Myrtle 

Neepawa 

Ottawa 

Payne 

Queen Dominion 

Rambler-Cariboo . . . 

Reco 

Richmond-Eureka . . 

Ruth 

Standard 

Silver Nugget 

Sovereign 

Sunset 

Tamarack 

Vancouver 

Wakefield 

"Washington 

Westmont 



Sandon 



Springer Creek 
Four Mile . ... 
New Denver. . . 

Sandon 

Slocan 

Sandon 

Silverton .... 



New Denver. 



Four Mile Creek 

Alamo 

N. Fk. Carpenter Creek. 

Sandon 

Three Forks 

Bear Lake 

Payne Mountain 

N. Fk. Carpenter Creek. 

Twelve Mile Creek 

New Denver 



Silverton 

Sandon 

Springer Creek . . . 
Ten Mile (Slocan) . 
Springer Creek . . . 

Sandon 

Howson Creek 

McGuigan 

Sandon 



Silverton , 



Slocan 

Cody 

Springer Creek . 

Silverton 

Four Mile Creek 

McGuigan 

Ten Mile 



Owner or Agent. 



Brandon Bros 

American Boy Mining Co 

Arlington Mines, Ltd 

E. Watson 

C. & Clipper Silver-lead, Mg. Co. 

Brandon Brothers 

A. D. Coplen 

Geo T. Gormley 

Laurenzo Alexander 

J. Marten 

A. H. Blumeneur 



Olcott Payne 

Idaho- Alamo Cons. Mines, Ltd . , 

Thos. Trenerv 

L. Pratt 

Geo. R. Petty 

G. W. Hughes 

A. H. Bigney 

C. E. Lvons 

J. T. Tipping 

Thos. Avison 

G. H. Aylard , 

Vancouver Group Mining Co ... , 

Howard Thompson 

J. E. Tattersall 

E. Shannon 

J. B. Faley 

Payne Cons. Mining Co 

Queen Dominion Mining Co 

Rambler-Cariboo Mines, Ltd . . . 
Reco Mining & Milling Co., Ltd 
Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada 

The Ruth Mines, Ltd 

G. H. Aylard 

J. B. Smith 

Slocan-Sovereign Mines Co 

G. W. Hughes 

Geo. McNichol 

Vancouver Group Mining Co . . . 

S. Watson 

The Washington Mine, Ltd 

Westmont Silver M. Co., Ltd. . . 



Silverton. . . . 
Spokane .... 

Slocan 

Silverton . . . 
New Denver 
Silverton . . 
Spokane 

Sandon 

Victoria 

New Denver 
Spokane .... 



Nelson 

Three Forks.. 

Kaslo 

Sandon 

Three Forks.. 

Kaslo 

Sandon 

Fernie, B. C. 
Slocan City . . 
New Denver . 



Rossland . . . 
Vancouver . . 
Slocan City . 
New Denver 
Slocan City . 

Sandon 

Kaslo 



Sandon 



Kaslo 

Xew Denver 



Kaslo 

Slocan 

Rossland . . . 
Silverton . 

Kaslo 

Slocan City 



Character of Ore. 



Silver, lead. 



LARDEAU MIXIXG DIVISH >N. 



Beatrice. . . 

Eva 

Mammoth . 
Old Gold . . 



Camborne Beatrice Mines, Ltd 

Incomappleux Creek ! Eva Gold Mines, Ltd 

ii ci ... . I Edward Baillie Svndicate, Ltd 
J.M.Miller....'. 



Fargo, North Dakota i Silver, lead. 

Gold. 
Nelson 
Seattle. 



Sih er, lead. 



TROUT LAKE MINING DIVISION. 



Silver Cup . 
Topsy 



Ferguson 
Poplar Creek 



Ferguson Mines, Ltd., N. P.L ... Ferguson . ... 
A. Hansen Poplar Creek . 



Gold, silver, lead. 
Silver, lead. 



TRAIL CREEK MINING DIVISION. 



Rossland , 



Centre Star and War 

Eagle . 

Evening Star 

LeRoi Mining Co . . . Rossland , 

LeRoi No. 2 

Mavflower n 

Nest Egg ,, 

"White Bear n 



Con. M. & S. Co. of Canada 

A. K. Heidler 

LeRoi Mining Co. , Ltd 

Le Roi No. 2, Ltd. 



Nest Egg & Fireflv G. M. Co 
Con. White Bear M. Co., Ltd. . . 



Rossland. 



Trail Creek 



Rossland 



Gold, silver, copper. 



GREENWOOD MINING DIVISION. 



Bay 

Boundary Elkhorn . . 
Cariboo-McKinney . . 
Duncan & Bounty Fr 
Emma 



Greenwood 

Providence Camp. 
Camp McKinney . . 
Wallace Mountain 
Summit Camp 



H. A. Fuller 

W. T. McCluig 

G. S. McNicol 

Wallace Mountain M. Co., Ltd 
B. C. Copper Co 



Spokane, Wash 

Sandon 

Phoenix 

Greenwood . . . 



Gold, silver. 

Gold, silver, lead. 

Gold. 

Silver, lead. 

Gold, silver, copper. 



8 Ed. 7 



Metalliferous Mixes Shipping in 1907. 



L 215 



GREENWOOD MIXING DIVISION.— Concluded. 



Mine or Group. 



Owner or Agent. 



Oro Denoro 

Mother Lode 

B. C 

Granby Co.'s Mines . 

Providence 

Riverside 

Sally 

Skylark and Denver. 

Snowshoe 

Strathmore 



Summit Camp. . . 
Deadwood Camp 
Summit Camp . . 

Phoenix 

Greenwood 

Rock Creek 

Beaverdell 

Skylark Camp . . . 

Phoenix 

Greenwood 



B. C. Copper Co 



Greenwood . 



Granby C. M. S. & P. Co Grand Forks, B. C. 

Providence Mining Co., N.P.L. . . Greenwood. 

Dermody i Sater [D. Co. 

Vancou\er«fc Boundary Ck. M. x 
Skvlark Development Co.. Ltd . . Phoenix . . 
Con. M. i S. Co. of Canada, Ltd. I ■■ 
Alex. Miller Greenwood 



Character of Ore. 



Gold, silver, copper. 



Gold, silver. 

Silver, lead. 
Gold, silver, lead. 
Gold, silver, copper. 
Gold, silver, lead. 



GRAND FORKS MINING DIVISION. 



Brooklyn-Idaho 
Mountain Rose . 

Rawhide 

Sunset 

Gold Drop 

Lightning Peak. 



1 Phoenix 

Summit Camp . . . 
Phoenix 

Wellington Camp. . 
North Fork Kettle. 



Dominion Copper Co Boundary Falls 



Granby Cons. M., S. i P. Co. Ltd Grand Forks 
W. A. Calder . Edgewood . . 



Gold, silver, copper. 
Silver, copper. 
Gold, silver, copper. 



Silver, lead. 



OSOYOOS MINING DIVISION. 



Dividend 

Nickel Plate 
Sunnyside . . 



Kruger Mountain 
Hedlev 



H. A. Bowerman ; Fairview, B. C 

Yale Mining Co Hedlev, B. C . . 



Gold, copper. 
Gold. 



*IMILKAMEEN AND VERNON MINING DIVISIONS. 



J. Graham 



Silver, copper. 



YALE AND KAMI/OOPS MINING DIVISIONS. 



Kamloops Mines . 



Kamloops : Kamloops Mines, Ltd 



Kamloops . 



Gold, silver, copper. 



ASHCROFT MINING DIVISION. 



Maggie 



Cariboo Road 



Ashcroft 



Copper. 



L1LLOOET MINING DIVISION. 



Cadwallader Creek .... Nat Couarhlan Lillooet , 



Gold. 



NANAIMO, ALBERNI, NEW WESTMINSTER AND VICTORIA MINING DIVISIONS. 



Nanaimo — 

Copper Cliff 

Copper Queen .... 


Texada Island 


Copper Cliff Mining Co 

Jas. Raper 

E M. Cox 


Heriot Bav 


Silver, copper. 
Gold, silver, copper. 








Little Billv 




Little Billv Operating Co 

Tacoma Steel Co 


Tacoma, Wash, U.S. A 




Marble Bav 

ilTete Westminster — 




Silver, copper. 
Gold, silver, copper. 

Silver, copper. 


I" • ,-ia — 


Howe Sound 


Britannia Copper Co., Ltd 


Vancouver, B. C ... 
















Duncan, B. C 


Gold, silver, copper. 


Richard III 




C. H. Dickie 

Tvee Copper Co. , Ltd . 


Tvee 


" 





SKEENA MINING DIVISI" >N. 



Ikeda Bay Mines. . . 
Outsiders 



Queen Charlotte Islands. Awaya Ikeda & Co., Ltd 
Portland Canal I Brown Alaska Co 



Ikeda Bay, Q. C. I. . . Gold, silver, copper. 
Hadlev, Alaska Copper. 



L 216 



Report of the Minister of .Mines. 



1908 



LIST OF CROWN-GRANTED MINERAL CLAIMS. 



CROWN GRANTS ISSUED IN 1907. 



CASSIAS. 



Claim. 



Astor 

At Last 

Bear Paw 

Cub Fraet 

Etta Extension 

Mavbe 

Sultan 

Sunrise 

Sunset 

White Baby . . . 

Alpha 

Blue Bell 



Brown 

Copper King 



Copper Queen 



Constance Fraet. 

Donald 

Eagle 



Gama 

Henrietta 



Hope. 



Kenneth . . 
Manson . . . 
Maple Leaf 



Margaret . . . 
May Queen. 



McKinley. 
Portland . 
Regina . . . 



Revenge 
Rose 



Rudge 

Scotland Forever Fraet. 
Scottish Chief 



Atlin 



Skeena . 



Grantee. 



Julius M. Ruffner .... 

William Gass 

Julius M. Ruffner 

Chas. F. O. Boehme 

J. Frank Breeze 

Louise L. Graham and Alex. McDonald 

William Gass 

Helen Flewin and George Rudge 

Wm. H. Collison, Wm. Noble, Win. E. Collison, John 
M. Collison, Watson D. Noble, David J. Rainey, Mat- 
thias Dangeli, David Doolan and Alfred Woodcroft 

Geo. D. Muraford 

William Noble, Walter R. Flewin, Wm. H. Collison, John 
M. Collison, Wm. E. Collison, Alfred Woodcroft, 
Matthias Dangeli and Alfred W. Mountain 

Wm. H. Collison, Wm. Noble, Wm. E. Collison, John 
M. Collison, Watson D. Noble, David J. Rainey, Mat- 
thias Dangeli, David Doolan and Alfred Woodcroft. . . 

Geo. D. M unifoii 1 

Helen Flewin and George Rudge 

William H. Collison, William Noble, William E. Collison, 
John M. Collison, Watson D. Noble, David J. Rainey, 
Matthias Dangeli, David Doolan and Alfred Woodcroft 

William Noble, Walter R. Flewin, Wm. H. Collison, 
John M. Collison. Wm. E. Collison, Alfred Wood- 
croft, Matthias Dangeli and Alfred W. Mountain 

Helen Flewin and George W. Rudge 

Elizabeth J. Smith, John H. Brandon, John Irving, Cuth- 
bert O. Worsfold, Richmond B. Halhed and Alex. 
D. Donaldson 

William Noble, Walter R. Flewin, Wm. H. Collison, 
John M Collison, Wm. E. Collison, Alfd. Woodcroft, 
Matthias Dangeli and Alfred W. Mountain 

Helen Flewin and George Rudge 

William H. Collison, William Noble, William E. Collison, 
John M. Collison, Watson D. Noble, David J. Rainey, 
Matthias Dangeli, David Doolan and Alfred Woodcroft 

Elizabeth J. Smith, John H. Brandon, John Irving, Cuth- 
bert C. Worsfold, Richmond B. Halhed and Alex D. 
Donaldson 

William H. Collison, William Noble, Wm. E. Collison, 
John M. Collison, Watson D. Noble, David J. Rainey. 
Matthias Dangeli, David Doolan and Alfred Woodcroft 

Helen Flewin and George Rudge 

Benjamin D. Brown 

William Noble, Walter R. Flewin, William H. Collison, 
John M. Collison, William E. Collison, Alfred Wood- 
croft, Matthias Dangeli and Alfred W. Mountain 

Helen Flewin and George Rudge 

William H. Collison, William Noble, William E. Collison, 
John M. Collison, Watson D. Noble, David J. Rainey, 
Matthias Dangeli, David Doolan and Alfred Wood- 
croft 

Helen Flewin and George Rudge 

George D. Mumford 

William H. Collison, William Noble, William E. Collison, 
John M. Collison, Watson D. Noble, David J. Rainey, 
Matthias Dangeli, David Doolan and Alfred Wood- 
croft 



Lot. No. 


Acres. 


523 


46.15 


277 


37.52 


518 


49.16 


520 


7.04 


27G 


26.00 


524 


51.55 


519 


37.30 


71 


51.65 


70 


51.64 


27S 


25.28 


4S6 


51.58 


571 


51.65 


567 


35.79 


565 


51.50 


574 


47.33 


56S 


6.48 


483 


51.65 


578 


50.12 


5S1 


51.65 


480 


51.27 


109 


38.20 


R. IV. 




566 


51.65 


488 


51.15 


4S5 


51.51 


572 


45.63 


110 


33.75 


R. IV. 




577 


51.65 


484 


51.58 


570 


45.06 


564 


50.56 


482 


51.65 


575 


51.65 


481 


51.65 


579 


10.44 


573 


34.89 



Date. 



Oct. 24 
Sept. 3 
Oct. 24 

24 

Sept. 4 
Oct. 24 

24 

Julv 23 

,.' 23 

Sept. 3 

Nov. 20 



Julv 31 
Sept. 27 



May 13 



Julv 31 
Sept. 27 
Nov. 20 



Julv 31 



May 13 
Oct. 20 



May 13 
Nov. 20 
20 



July 31 
Mar. 25 



Julv 31 
Nov. 20 
Julv 19 



Mav 13 

Nov. 20 



Julv 31 
Nov. 20 
Oct. 1 



8 Ed. 7 



Ckown Grants. 



L 217 



CASSIAR. —Concluded. 



Claim. 



Summit 

Thistle 

Tunnel Fract 



Division. 



William Noble, Walter R. Flewin, William H. Collison, 
John M. Collison, William E. Collison, Alfred Wood 
croft, Matthias Dangeli and Alfred W. Mountain 

William H. Collison, William Noble, William E. Collison 
John M. Collison, Watson D. Noble, David J. Rainej' 
Matthias Dangeli, David Doolan and Alfred Wood 
croft 

Geo. D. Mumford . 



Lot. No. 



576 
569 



Acres. 



46.75 
4.22 



Date. 



May 13 



July 31 
Sept. 27 



EAST KOOTENAY. 



Ajax 

Big Three 

Cambrian 

Daisy 

Dodo 

Goliath 

Hematite 

Hercules 

Hercules 

Jubilee 

Kent 

Keystone Fret 

Mammoth 

Pedro 

Silver Queen 

Snowdrift 

Tempest 

Victoria 

Windfall 

Mabel R 

Silver Belt 

Bobbie Burns 

Carbonate Fractional . . . 

Sunday 

Yvonne 



Fort Steele . 

M 

Windermere 
Golden 



James T. Laidlaw 

Thos. McVittie, Alex. C. Roberson and Willis E. Johnson. 

The Black Mackay Mining Co., Ltd., N. P. L 

William R. Ross 

Thomas Starbird and James A. Harvey 

James T. Laidlaw 

James T. Laidlaw 

Edmund A. Elton and E. Frith Cummins 

Jas. T. Laidlaw 

Duncan McFarlane and Edward A. Wood 

James T. Laidlaw 

James A. Harvey 

Walter Van Arsdalen 

John Leask, Thos. A. Crighton, Alfred E. Watts, Arch- 
ibald W. McVittie and George Bremner 

Edmund A. Elton and E. Frith Cummins 

James T. Laidlaw 

James T. Laidlaw 

Duncan McFarlane and Edward A. Wood 

Alfred Doyle 

Herbert C. Hammond and Thos. Jones 

Chas. M. Keep 

Alfred O. Beardmore 

Charles M. Keep 

Louis Jodoin 

Louis Jodoin 



6347 


51.59 


5814 


51.65 


7662 


51.00 


5252 


41.60 


2038 


43.60 


6346 


51.65 


6348 


42.63 


4052 


51.65 


6349 


51.16 


7652 


51.11 


6350 


51.64 


2039 


34 84 


5815 


41.82 


2313 


51.65 


4053 


51.38 


6352 


49.58 


6351 


51.65 


7651 


44.30 


7324 


30.40 


5103 


51.65 


3696 


51.50 


5112 


23.60 


3698 


23.50 


211 


51 30 


7147 


36.75 



May 13 

Mar 27 

Sep. 20 

Oct. 23 

Mar. 4 

May 13 

i. 13 

July 22 

May 13 

Mar. 27 

May 13 

Mar. 4 



Sept. 7 

July 22 

Mav 13 

i. 13 

n 13 

Dec. 23 

Dec. 16 

July 23 

Feb. 27 

ii 4 

Dec. 14 

• • 14 



W T EST KOOTENAY. 



Blue Quartz 

Canadian Girl .... 

Celebration 

Central 

Central Fractional 

Echo 

Edith 

Giant Fret 

Ibis . 

Jennie 

Mastadon 

Matton 

Monte Carlo 

Nellie J 

Nellie N 

Rover 

Santiago Fret .... 

Snowdrop 

Snow King 

Snowstorm 

.Stillwater 

Stillwater Fret . . . 

Venus Fret 

Yankee Girl. ..... 

Yukon Fret 

Apex 

Atlas 

Black Bear 

Black Fox 

Democrat 

Dora 

Eva 

Evening Star 

Grand View 

Granite 

Grey Eagle 

Irene. 



Ainsworth 



Annie R. Peters and Francis B. H. Bonter 

James Cronin, David E. Grobe, Donald A. McLeod and 

Eber J. Moore 

Thos. Wall 

Edward Dumont, Rodolphe Legault and Louis Niven 

Thomas Wall 

George A. M. Young 

Aaron H. Kelly 

Geo. A. M. Young 



Elisha Bigelow 

Geo. A. Campbell 

James R. Hunnex 

Elisha Bigelow 

Andrew Sostad 

Annie R. Peters and Francis B. H. Bonter. 

Frank D. LeMieux 

Thomas Wall 



William J. Wilson and Edward A. Crease (executors of the 
estate of A. J. Marks) and Montagu S. Davys 

Rich. A. Hutchinson 

James Cronin, David E. Grobe, Donald A. McLeod and 

Eber J. Moore 

Patrick Daly, William M. Coffey, Alfred J. Hughes and 

John Ryan 

Dan Henrv Nellis 



Daniel J. Munn and Alfred E. Cross. . . 

James M. Miller 

Irene Mining Co 

Dan H. Nellis 

William Chaplin and Alice G. Caldwell 



Dan H. Nellis . . . 
Irene Mining Co. 



7C72 


51.65 


7713 


50.09 


7229 


51.65 


4801 


36.37 


4802 


5.95 


7232 


43.40 


6633 


51.65 


6449 


20.96 


6068 


39.60 


6632 


22.70 


1070 


51.65 


7877 


37.92 


1066 


28.16 


1071 


51.65 


6057 


31.20 


7073 


37.84 


2226 


1.20 


7234 


17.40 


72?5 


19.80 


7236 


20.60 


3811 


38.20 


3810 


21.80 


2418 


16.60 


7712 


47.06 


5303 


28.78 


6505 


45.60 


6268 


49.15 


6262 


51.17 


6506 


34.50 


2837 


46.21 


4702 


35.71 


7463 


51.65 


6512 


51.65 


6279 


37.86 


6278 


40.08 


7470 


47.50 


7464 


51.65 



April 10 

9 
Dec. 2 
Mar. 27 

„ 27 
Dec. 2 
Aug. 28 
Mar. 27 
Aug. 28 

ii 28 
Mar. 26 
Nov. 7 
Aprii 10 
Mar 26 
Sept. 13 
April 10 

., 10 

Dec. 2 

2 

ii 2 

April 10 
10 
10 



9 
July 24 
Nov. 22 
Dec. 3 
July 24 
Dec. 13 
Nov. 22 
May 15 
July 24 
May 15 
15 
Dec. 3 
May 15 



L 218 



Report of the Minister of Mixes. 



1908 



WEST KOOTENAY.— Continued. 



Claim. 



Jumbo 

King Fret 

King Solomon 

Kootenay Star 

Kootenay Star Fret . 

Kotnen 

Moonlite 

No. 1 

Ontario No. 2 

Opher No. 3 

Red Fox 

Silver Cup 

Silvery Moon 

Silvery Moon Fret . . 

Treadwell 

Alta Fractional 

Arena Fractional . . 

B. C 

Bristol 



Chicago Fractional 
Commander 



Congo No. 2 . 



Deception 

Eclipse No. 2 

Happy Medium 

International 

Jenny Jones 

J. I. C 

John D. Mabley Fret. 

Joy 

Joy Fret 

Lost Bear 

May 

Milton 

Milton Fret 

Moonlight 

Pullman Fret 

Strathroy 

Vevev 

Ell . .' 

Exe 

Eye Fractional 

Canadian 

Lorna Doone 



Division. 



Ainsworth . 



Slocan 



Martha Jane Fret. 

Minto 

Silver Bell 



A. K. Fractional. . . 

Bell Boy 

Florence 

Forbes Fret 

Glooseap 

Glooscap No. 2 

Glooseap No. 3 

Greater New York. 
Home Run Lode . . 

Independent 

J. C 



Jumbo 

Kootenay No. 1 

Kootenay No. 2 

Kootenay No. 3 Fret. 

Lardo 

May 

May No. 1 

ii No. 2 

n No. 3 

.. No. 4 

n No. 5 

Mazama 



Slocan City 
Revelstoke 



Trout Lake 



Minnie Fret 



Morning Star. 
Pedro . . 



Pilot 

Pilot Fret 

Rattler 

Rattler No. 1. 
Reward Fret.. 



Dan Henrv Nellis 



Daniel J. Munn, Alfred E. Cross. 

David W. Moore 

Dan H. Nellis 



Leander Hanna 
Henrv Brook . . 
Dan H. Nellis . . 



James M. Miller 



Daniel J. Munn and Alfred E. Cross 

Lucius A. Cole 

George H. Aylard 

Horace G. Van Tuyl 

Charles E. Hope, John A. Turner and Mary E. Rammel- 

mej er 

Franklin P. O'Neill 

Chas. E. Hope. John A. Turner and Mary E. Rammel- 

meyer . 

Ckas. E. Hope, John A. Turner and Mary E. Rammel- 

meyer 

Evelyn M. Sandilands, John Tinlingand Alfred R. Fingland 
Lucius A. Cole 



George H. Aylard . . . 
Horace G. Van Tuyl . 



Herman Cleaver and Geo. C. Walton. 

Horace G. Van Tuyl 

Robert McPherson 



Henrv Brook 

Franklin P. O'Neill. 
Horace G . Van Tuyl . 

Lucius A. Cole 

John M. McGregor. . . 



David Cowan and John H. Hickman 

John C. Ross, Edmund R. Wylie, John T. Wood and 

Gertrude N. Wylie 

The Prince Mining and Development Co., Ltd 



James I. Woodrow, Alex. W. Mcintosh, George Johnson 

and Elizabeth McMahon 

Reward Gold and Silver Mining Co., Ltd., N.P. L 



Lot No. 



Ludger Guere 

The Reward Gold and Silver Mining Co., Ltd., N.P.L 

John W. Chism, Alexander Dodds, Samuel A. Sutherland 

and Bruce White 

The Reward Gold and Silver Mining Co., Ltd., N.P.L 



Gordon Logan, John D. McDonald, James Hislop and 
Edward Baillie 

Clara G. Westfall, administratrix of the estate of John 
W. Westfall, deceased, intestate 

The Reward Gold and Silver Mining Co., Ltd.. N.P.L 

Clara G. Westfall, administratrix of John W. Westfall, 
deceased, intestate, and James M. Miller 

The Reward Gold and Silver Mining Co., Ltd., N.P.L 



6510 
6501 
6958 
2836 
2838 
7472 
6509 
6002 
3182 
7381 
6959 
6507 
4697 
4700 
2839 
6587 
2539 
5555 

5735 
3310 

5736 

5734 
7685 
6586 
5558 
5559 
2533 
2534 
5568 
5564 
5563 
6871 
5553 
2159 
3825 
7382 
3309 
5554 
5560 
5505 
5504 
5506 
7493 

5068 
7487 
74S6 

7493 
7443 
7442 
7051 
7592 
7257 
7258 
7259 
3754 
4253 
7053 

7263 
7052 
7247 
7248 
7250 
7249 
7439 
7438 
7436 
7437 
7435 
7434 

7588 

7597 
7252 

7596 
7050 
7254 
7048 
7251 
7255 



30.20 
51.20 
51.65 
48.04 
12.55 
51.65 
50.30 
48.27 
51.65 
30.40 
27.20 
44.70 
51.00 
34.69 
51.11 
5.34 
13.62 
29.00 

46.88 
3.92 



Date. 



July 24 

.. 24 

., 24 

Dec. 12 

Nov. 25 

Dec. 3 

July 24 

Dec. 3 

.. 11 

May 14 

,. 24 

July 24 

Nov. 23 

,. 22 

Dec. 13 

June 27 

Nov. 12 



Dec. 
Sep. 



36.91 Dec. 24 



43.91 
48.16 
50.70 
26.48 
45.91 
38.22 
22.30 
15.18 
50 56 
27.87 
50.97 
46.96 
51.44 
29.20 
42.85 
32.00 
36.67 
50.87 
43.97 
44.80 
39 15 
41.26 

39.60 
29.57 
51.65 

50.96 
1.86 
IS. 27 
50.66 
0.23 
32.03 
36.40 
24.09 
32.51 
9.96 
32.62 

51.65 
36.00 
34.90 
18.00 
16.55 
26.23 
22.70 
22.01 
36.00 
33.00 
47.59 
47.59 

39.17 



41.19 

36.03 
29.40 
0.14 
42.10 
41.19 
13.20 



i, 23 

Mar. 4 

June 27 

., 26 

ii 27 

Nov. 12 

.. 12 

6 

6 

6 

18 



July 

Nov. 6 

Sep. 17 

Oct. 18 

June 27 

Sep. 12 

Nov. 6 

June 27 

Dec. 3 
3 

n 3 

May 15 

Feb. 27 

May 14 

,, 14 

July 19 

Sept. 10 

„ 10 



July 
Sept. 



Oct. 


23 


Sept. 


9 

9 


,, 


10 


ii 


10 


„ 


Vi 


,, 


VI 


,, 


10 


,, 


10 


,, 


111 


n 


10 


" 


10 


Dec. 


24 


Oct. 


9 


Sept. 


LO 


Dec. 


23 


Sept. 


9 

10 


,, 


9 


i, 


10 


ii 


10 



8 Ed. 7 



Crown Gkants. 



L 219 



WEST KOOTENAY.— Concluded. 



Claim. 



U and I 

Ukiale 

Union Jack 

Gilman 

Globe 

Lone Star Fret. . . . 
St. Kew 

Spyglass 

Western Star. . . . 

Western Star Fret 

Adventurer 

Golden Eagle 

Iron Duke 

Outlook 

Sunshine 

Watchman 



Division. 



Arrow Lake 



Grantee. 



Alice E. Jowett 

John W. Chism, Alex. Dodds, Samuel A. Sutherland and 

Bruce White 

The Reward Gold and Silver Mining Co.. Ltd., X.P.L. . . 

Barclay Crilly 

The Spyglass Mining and Development Co., Ltd., X'.P.L. . 

(ieo. .Martin and Thos. Flack 

The El wood Tin workers Gold Mining Co. of Lardeau, B.C., 

Ltd., X.P.L ' 

The Spyglass Mining and Development Co., Ltd., X.P.L . 
The ElwoodTinworkersGold Mining Co. of Lardeau, B.C., 

Limited, X.P.L 

Thomas Abriel ... . 

Ellen McDougal, administratrix of the estate of Arch'd 

McDougal, deceased intestate 

Richard Smith 

Thomas Abriel 

Thomas Abriel and Elizabeth Scott 

Richard Smith 



Lot Xo. 


Acres. 


7589 


51.65 


7267 


51.65 


7049 


45.00 


4496 


51.65 


7525 


50.75 


3491 


5.98 


7363 


48.15 


7524 


48.89 


7351 


51.65 


7355 


34.77 


1067 


27.56 


3018 


44.16 


1068 


38.08 J 


2476 


33.20 


2477 


41.19 


2475 


40. C8 



Date. 



Oct. 22 

23 
Sept. 9 
May 14 

22 

Jan. 23 

May 15 
July 22 

May 15 

n 15 
ii 14 



Jan. 
May 



BOUXDARY. 



Bank of England 

Bank of England Fret. . 

Black Bear 

Black Bear Fret 

Black Eye Xo. 1 

Dabney Fret 

Dead wood 

Derby 

Emma 

Homestake 

Ida 

Joker Fractional 

Jumbo 

Messenger 

Moonlight 

Mossback . . 

Norton Fret 

Old Dominion Fret 

Omar 

Pinto 

Prize Xo. 2 

Richmond 

Richmond Fret 

Robinson 

Saloon Fret 

Standard 

Thuot 

Uncle Sam 

Big Monte 

Black Bess 

Brandeuberger 

Burns 

Cairngorm Fractional. . 

Champion Fractional . . 

Climax 

Copper Mine Fractional 

Custer Fret 

Dimond Fret 

Double Standard 

Eagle Fractional 

Eureka Fret . 

Gem 

Big Bend 

Hill Fret 

Hope Xo. 2 

Keno 

Little Chief 

Little Ruth 

London 

Lucky Shot Fret 

Maple Leaf 

Maple Leaf Fret 

May 

Minneapolis Fret 

Montana 

Montana Fret 



Grand Forks. 



Grand Forks 



Greenwood . 



The Granby Cons. M. S. & P. Co., Ltd. 



•John Mulligan 

The Granby Cons. M. S. & P. Co., Ltd 

X'eil MeCallum and Donald Morrison 

David G. Evans and Edgar H. Willett 

Frank Coryell, Alexander McDonald, James H. Hodson 

and l'eter Wolf 

Chas. M. Kingston 

Clinton A. S. Attwoodand William A. Pounder 

Alex. .McDonald. Peter Wolf and Frank Coryell 

.lames X'ewby 

John Mulligan 

Alonzo V. Downs. ... 

Geo. C. Rose and William H. Beach 

Milton D. White and John Simpson 

Alonzo V. Downs ,. 

James F. Cunnigham 

Ewart G. Cummins and Melvin D. Schenk 



Thomas X'ewby 

Geo. C. Rose and William H. Beach 

Albert E. Savage 

Henry Johnson 

Hiram R. Parsons and Geo. T. Xye 

James T. Cunningham and William T. Smith 

.Michael R. Feeney 

Chas. Patsworth and Jos. H. Graham 

William M. McKay 

James X. Pat ton, Forbea M. Kerby and Adolphus R. 

Thomas 

Philip B. S. Stanhope 

John Charles Eek 

William F. Proctor 

The Vancouver and Boundary Creek Developing and 

Mining Co., Ltd 

Joseph Martin and Isaac H. Hallett 

Arthur X. Pellv 

William Hanna 

Daniel Bresnahan 

William Dimond and John P. McLeod 

Elizabeth McKellar 

Elizabeth Galloway 

John Matthews 

Isaac H. Hallett, Geo. R. Xaden, Edward H. Mortimer, 

Geo. A. Rendell and Hubert J. Bayly 

Mary A. Holbrook 

Chas. J. McArthur 

Forbes M. Kerby 

William Macy and William M. Law 

Duncan Mcintosh, Win. M Law, Frank J. Miller, Patrick 

Hickey and Harry K. Morgan 

Geo. M. Foster and Frank F. Ketchum 

Henry J. Clint, Edgar J. Smith, Christopher H. Reeves 

and James E. Thompson 

Robert Wood 

Francis W. Groves . .' 

Adolph Sercu and Joseph Hedges 

Isaac H. Hallett 

William L. C. Gordon 

Alexander Waddell and William G. McMvnn 



1235S, 
462 S 
1236S, 
3556 
2029 
3506 

590 S, 
2233 

307 S. 

.'-OS. 

575 S. 
1810 
342S. 
121 S. 

1623 

343 S. 

986 

*57S. 

456 S. 
3240 

120 S. 
2232 
2918 
1561 
2457 
3378 

455 S. 
3239 

1239 
2914 
2982 
2911 

2853 
2850 

2633 
3600 

160S. 
2289 
2569 
22-2 
3259 

2632 
2630 
2945 
1849 
2522 
1406 

881 S. 
2291 

3310 

2174 
2040 
2629 
2940 
3153 
2645 



29.57 
1.63 

49.51 
7.33 

33.15 
6.01 

17.65 
52.32 
51.65 
23.50 
45.4!) 
21.26 
51.65 
50-56 
51.65 
40.57 
16.75 
35.23 
38.10 
45.16 
51.65 
48.90 
24.93 
39.39 
8.75 
32.14 
29.74 
51.10 

42.18 
42.69 
51.65 
41.00 

4.48 
28.35 
43.90 

0.85 
41.80 
16.80 
47.42 
17.95 
29.65 

34.88 
43.11 
51.65 
44.30 
51.65 
50.82 

12.63 
44.03 

32.81 
50.40 
34.91 
47.06 
35.44 
42.32 
34.75 



June 


27 


,, 


27 


Max- 


14 


June 


27 


Nov. 


7 


Sept. 


17 


Xov. 


6 


Mar. 


26 


July 


22 


Nov. 


l'.i 


Oct. 


32 


May 


14 


Xov. 


8 


Dee. 


4 


Nov. 


12 


,, 


8 


Sept, 


4 


Xov. 


23 


,, 


23 


Mar. 


26 


Dee. 


4 


,, 


20 


Mar. 


5 


May 


15 


Sept. 


18 


May 


15 


Sep. 


18 


Oct. 


17 


Xov. 


11 


,, 


8 


July 


19 


Xov. 


25 


Jan. 


26 


Sept. 


12 


Feb. 


28 


•Ian. 


26 


Nov. 


25 


Feb. 


4 


June 


27 


Dee. 


4 


Mar. 


26 


Sept. 


18 


Oct. 


18 


Sept. 


17 


Oct. 


21 


July 


19 


Jan. 


7 


Xov. 


25 


Sept. 


12 


Oct. 


2 


July 


22 


Sept. 


16 


Mar. 


27 


,, 


26 


Oct. 


2 


Dec. 


24 



L -2-20 



Report of the Minister of .Mixes. 



1908 



BOUND AEY.— Con tinned. 



Monte Bravo 

Montrose Fret 

Morena Fret 

Myrtle No. 2 

Northern Bell 

No. 9 

Optic 

Ottawa Fret 

Putnam 

Ruby 

Salamanca Fret 

San Juan 

Summit 

Teutonia Fret 

Victor Fret 

Virginius 

W. S 

Wallace Fret 

Windsor Fret 

Woodstock 

Bones Fractional 

Buller 

Cabin No. 3 Fret 

Castle Fractional 

Columbia Fret 

Cracker Jack 

Farrview 

Fairy gueen 

Glenwood Fret 

Greenwood 

Haligonian 

Iron Plate Fret 

Ironsides 

Kitchener 

O. I. C. Fret 

Pinnacle 

Red Top 

Roberts 

Somerset 

Sweden 

Union Jack 

Valentine 

Big Bend 

Chicago 

Homestead Fractional 

Klondvke 

No. 66 Fret 

No. 67 

No. 68 

No. 69 

Rifle 

America 

Big Dutchman 

Black Prince 

Fortuna No. 2 

Fortuna No. 3 

Frisco 

Pekin 

Bonanzv 



St. Verd 

St V. Fret 

U. V. Fret 

United Verd No. 1 . 

ii No. 2. 

No. 3. 



Division. 



Greenwood . 



Osoyoos 



Similkameen 



Nicola 



Lillooet 



James Napier Paton, Forbes M. Kerb; and Adolphus 
R. Thomas .' 

Forbes M. Kerby 

Isaac II. Hallett, George R. Naden, Edward H. Mortimer, 
George A. Rendell and Hubert J. Bayly 

Henry J. Clint, Edgar J. Smith, Christopher H. Reeves 
and James E. Thompson 

Henry J. Clint, Edgar J. Smith, Christopher H. Reeves 
and James E. Thompson 

Harry L. Morgan, Patrick Hit-key. Frank J. Miller, Wil- 
liam M. Law and Duncan Mcintosh 

Edmund T. Wiekwire and James T. Erwin 

Thomas Hemmerle and Hugh MeKee 

John Matthews 

Edward Pope 

Sydney M. Johnson and Sidney S. Oppenheimer 

Joseph Martin and Isaac H. Hallett 

Dougal Mclnnes, George W. Rumberger and Thomas 
Roderick 

John \V. Frost and Mary T. McMynn 

Andrew Thisted and Patrick W. George 

John Mulligan and William Hanna 

Elizabeth Galloway 

Forbes 81 Kerby 

John O. Thompson 

Ail 1 Iph Sercu 

Peter Scott 

The Dominion Cons. Mines Co., Ltd., N.P.L 

Duncan Woods 

John Gladden, Fred'k W. Gladden, James N. Paton, 
Walter E. Hodges, Duncan Woods, Frederick M. 
Elkins and Clinton A. S. Attwood 

Duncan Woods 

Louis 1 1. Hedland, John Greenhill and Hans P. Nelson. . . 

Tic 1 1 minion Cons. Mines Co.. Ltd., N.P.L 

John Gladden, Fred'k W. Gladden. James X. Paton, 
Walter E. Hodges, Duncan Woods, Fred'k M. Elkins 
and Clinton A. S. Attwood 

Myron K. Rodgers 

Duncan Woods 

The Dominion Cons. Mines Co., Ltd., N.P.L 

Chas. E. Oliver 

James F. Campbell, Henry W. Yates and Sydney M. 
Johnson 

The Dominion Cons. Mines Co., Ltd., N.P.L 

Louis O. Hedlund, John Greenhill and Elans P. Nelson... 

Duncan Woods 

John Gladden, Fred. W. Gladden. .lame-; X. Paton. Walter 
E. Hodges, Duncan Woods. Frederick M. Elkins and 
Clinton A. S. Attwood 

The Dominion Cons. Mines Co., Ltd., N.P.I 

John Gladden, Fred'k W. Gladden, James N. Paton, 
Fred'k M. Elkins, Walter E. Hodges, Duncan Woods 
and Charles A. S. Attwood 

Duncan Woods 



Isaac II. Hallett. George R. Naden, Edw"d H. Mortimer, 

George A. Rendell and Hubert J. Bayly 

William H. Armstrong 

Geo. B. Lyon 

Albert E. House, Benjamin Baker and Thos. J. McAIpine 
Mary A. Voigt 



Nettie II. Stuart 

William H. Thomas 

Samuel J. Bate 

John E. Bate 

Isaac Eastwood 

F>aser River Copper Mining Co 

John E. Bate 



Geo. A. Stanton, Henry T. Ceperley, Francis W. Rounsefell, 
Alex. D. Irving, Louis Bayard, Otto Delevere, James 
J. Kenny, Joseph M. Biggert, William S. Banta, John 
W. i;. Cofran, Richard M. Bissell, Chas. H. Tupper, 
John Hendry 



1241 

2664 



S82S. 

966 
3503 
3150 

452 S. 
2902 
2849 

2157 
2392 

445 S. 
1950 
2281 
1539 
3008 
2627 
2669 

554 S. 

494 S. 



38 S. 
495 S, 
327 S 

556 S. 



40 S. 
3465 
3114 
557 S. 
1980 

724 
552 S, 
3276 
41 S. 



36 S. 

555 S. 



39 S. 

42 S. 
493 S. 
496 S. 

2630 

260 
3409 

378 S. 

58 S. 

59 S. 
60S. 
61 S. 

2046 
1533 
1531 
1565 
1593 
1594 
1534 
1515 



2269 
2270 
2277 
2272 
2273 
2274 
2275 



49.84 
47.01 

17.82 

25.33 

45.71 

13.65 
33.25 
40.96 
51.49 
49.10 
50.09 
46.00 

49.55 
23.86 

0.32 
45.77 
40.60 
39.51 
28.50 
48 

7.0 
49.97 
40.11 



36.10 
41.70 
51.65 
41.51 



51.07 
21.00 
48.72 
40.31 
5.S2 

44.30 

30 . 21 
39.80 
30.00 



50.93 
48.13 



15.60 
37.38 
51.65 
47.38 

43.11 

19.22 

20 76 

41.19 

50. S7 

3S.14 

39.56 

30.43 

41.22 

50.62 

39.79 

40.84 

51.4 

51.65 

51.65 

51.65 



51.65 
50.52 
46.10 
33.50 
49.51 
17.90 
44.60 



Nov. 11 
Sept. 20 

Oct. 18 



Nov. 25 

M 22 

Oct. 2 

Mar. 26 

Nov. 23 

Oct. 10 

Nov. 4 

Sep. 3 

Mar. 5 

Jan. 7 

Oct. 2 

Dec. 4 

Sep. 12 

Nov. 2 

Mar. 27 

Oct. 10 

Aug. 23 

Sep. 6 



Feb. 2. 

Sep. 7 

Mar. 4 

Aug. 23 



Feb. 2 

May 14 

Sep. 6 

Aug. 23 

Sep. 3 

Sep. 13 

Aug. 23 

Mar. 4 

Sep. 6 



Feb. 2 
Aug. 23 



Feb. 2 

Nov. 23 

Sep. 6 

7 

Oct. 18 

Sep. 3 

., 13 

., 18 

Jan. 24 

ii 24 

ii 24 

Oct. 30 

Sep. 17 

Dec. 16 

, 16 



April 11 
, 11 



8 Ed. 7 



Crown Grants. 



L 221 



BOUNDARY. — Con eluded. 



Claim. 


Division. 


Grantee. 


Lot Xo. 


Acres. 


Date. 


Unite' 1 Verd Xo. 4 

:, XO. 5 


Lillooet 


Geo. A. Stanton, Henry T. Ceperley, Francis W. Rounse- 
fell, Alex. D. Irving, Louis Bayard, Otto Delevere, 
James J. Kennv, Joseph M. Biggert, William S. Banta, 
John W. G. Cofran, Richard M. Bissell, Chas. H. 


2271 
2278 

2276 


47.35 
51.41 

51.65 


April 11 


ii Xo. G 





" 


', 11 







VANCOUVER ISLAND AND COAST. 



Ballarat 

Emily R 

Lord of the Isles Xo. 4 

Rainy Day 

Southern Cross 

Brooklyn 

Dew Drop Fret 

Grey Mute 

Xew York 

Omaha 

Rebecca 

Seattle 

Tacoma 

Xella C 

Countess Fractional .. 

Dora 

Duchess 

Duke 

King George 

Lawaranee 

Lion Fret 

Mabel 

Orwell 

Princess Fret 

Queen 

Rock Bluff 

Rubv Fret 

Thalia 

Victoria 

Agnes Fractional 

Alice Fractional 

Amy Fractional 

Angel Xo. 2 

Angel Xo. 3 

Banker 

Black Prince 

Bluff Fractional 

Britannia 

Casher 

Charmer 

Etta Fret 

Europe 

Helen 

Ike 

Khedive Fret 

Lottie H 

Mountain View Fret. . . . 

Pasha 

Rose Fret 

Shannie Fret 

South Valley 

Speculator 

Standard. ... 

Sulton Fret 

Summit Fret 

Wandering Jew 

Winston Fret 



Alberni The Southern Cross Copper Mine Co. , X. P. L 

Ernest V. Bodwell 



Clayoquot . 



Xanaimo . 
Victoria . , 



William M. Brewer 

The Southern Cross Copper Mine Co., Ltd., X.P.L 

The British Pacific Gold Property Co., Ltd 

Edgar Dewdnev and Arthur R. Spriogett 

The British Pacific Gold Property Co! , Ltd 



Donald McCallum 

Samuel Erb 

The Koksilah Mining Co., Ltd., X.P.L. 
Samuel Erb 



James L. Hird 



Koksilah Mining Co., Ltd., X.P.L. 

James L. Hird 

Samuel Erb! 



James L. Hird 

The Koksilah Mining Co., Ltd., X.P.L. 

Jerry S. Rogers 

Samuel Erb 

Xew Westminster William M. Humphrevs 

John A. Flett ". 

John F. Humphrevs 

John A. Flett " 



Xew Westminster . 



James Dixon and C. Maude Wickenden 

William Whalen 

The Britannia Copper Syndicate, Ltd., X. P.L. 

William M. Humphreys 

James Dixon and C. Maude Wickenden 

Bertha M. Clark 

John A. Flett 

George E. Davis 

Wm. M. Humphreys 

David Sanguinete, Girolano Lavagnino and Thos. T. Scott 
William M. Humphreys 



Geo. E. Davies 

William M. Humphreys. 



William M. Humphreys. 
John A. Flett ! 



William M. Humphreys. 



The Britannia Copper Syndicate, Ltd., X.P.L. 
William M. Humphreys 



330 

696 

695 

379 

329 

701 

581 

705 

703 

702 

706 

700 

704 

436 

7G 

35G 

4G 

3G 

5G 

20 G 

15G 

36 G 
3G 
6G 
2G 
1G 

37 G 
127 G 

1G 
2016 
2323 
2093 
1948 
2279 
1950 
1972 
1971 
1996 
1949 
2021 
2322 
1974 
1991 
1975 
1999 
1882 
2207 
1994 
2013 
1992 
1635 A 
2321 
2280 
2012 
1998 
2084 
2015 



45.79 
32 

23.61 
41.50 

19.31 
26.52 

5U.67 
16.94 
33.53 

8.46 
36.02 
46.46 
37.06 

0.50 
51.65 
4.' :• I 

51.65 
51.65 
47.62 
51.65 
33.76 
13.10 
50.80 
47.62 

9.1 
49.82 
46.32 
10.72 
34.1s 
16.76 

3.35 
47.58 
28.89 

6.36 
31.97 
2;.5.i 
19.68 
51.65 
15.8 
12.50 
51.65 
28.00 
22.60 
51.65 

1.84 
50.82 
17.68 

3.47 
49.17 
37.02 
50.12 
28.54 
37.56 
39.24 
15.29 



Dec. 9 

Oct 18 

., 18 

Aug. 29 

Dec. 9 

Dee. 17 

Nov. 9 

Dec. 17 

,. 17 

.. 17 

.. 17 

.. 16 

.. 17 

Dec. 4 

Feb. 27 

Sept. 3 

Feb. 27 

• • 27 

.. 27 

Aug. 31 

.. 31 

Sept 3 

Aug. 31 

Feb. 27 

- 27 

Aug. 31 

Sept. 3 

Nov. 4 

Feb. 27 

Nov. 9 

Dec. 13 

Nov. 9 

Dec. 13 

.. 13 

Aug. 19 

Feb. 4 

Dec 28 

Nov. 8 

Aug. 19 

Mar. 4 

Dec. 13 

Jan. 9 

Nov. 8 

Jan. 9 

Xov. 8 

8 

Mar. 5 

Nov. 8 

8 

Xov. 8 

ii 2 

Dec. 11 

11 

Xov. 8 

ii 2 

Dec. 4 

Xov. 8 



L 222 



Report of the Minister of- Mines. 



1908 



GOLD COMMISSIONERS AND MINING RECORDERS. 



Mining Divisions. 



Atlin Mining Division. 
Sub-office 



Stikine Mining Division . . 
Liard » 

Skeena Mining Division . . 
Sub-office 



Bella Coola Mining Div. . . 

Sub-office 

Queen Charlotte Mining D. 

Sub-office 



Omineca Mining Division . 
Sub-office 



Cariboo Mining Division. 

Sub-office 

Quesnel Mining Division. 



Sub-office 



Location of 
Office. 



Atlin 

Discovery City . . 
Telegraph Creek. 
Wynoton 

Haines (U. S. | . . . 



Telegraph Creek . . 



Port Simpson .... 

Kitimat 

Prince Rupert .... 

Essington 

Stewart (Portland 
Unuk River. . . . 
Hartlev Bay 



Port Simpson 
Bella Coola 



Jedway . . . 

Skidegate. 
Masset . . . 



Hazelton 



Fort Grahame. . 
Fort St. James . 
Fort St. John . , 
Manson Creek . . 

Aldermere 

Skeena Canyon. 
Lome Creek 



Barkerville 
Quesnel 



150-Mile House. 

Quesnel 

Quesnel Forks . . 



Clinton Mining Division . . 
Lillooet » 

Kamloops Mining Division 
Ashcroft « 

Similkameen n 

Sub-office 

Nicola Mining Division . . 
Yale 

Vernon Mining Division . . 

Greenwood Mining Div. . . 
Sub-office 



Clinton . 
Lillooet . 



Grand Forks Min. Div . 



'"I 

Kamloops 

Ashcroft 

Princeton 

Hedley 

Nicola 

Yale 



Vernon 



Greenwood 

Vernon 

Camp McKinney. 
Beaverdell 



Grand Forks 



Gold Commissioner. 



J. A. Fraser 



Jas. Porter 



William Manson. 



Canal i 



William Manson. . . 
(at Port Simpson) 



William Manson . . 
(at Port Simpson) 



Fred W. Valleau. 



Geo. J. Walker . 



Geo. J. Walker. . 
(at Barkerville) 



F. Soues 

C. Phair 

A. M. Ego, Deputy 

G. C. Timstall .... 

n (at Kamloops) 



L. Norris 



W. G McMynn 



S. R. Almond 



Mining Recorder. 



(Com. for taking 

Affidavits) 
Jas. Porter 



William Manson. 



William Manson. . 
(at Port Simpson. 



E. M. Sandilands. 



Jas. E. Kirbv 



R. C. S. Randall . . 



C. W. Grain 



F. Soues 

C. Phair ) 

A. M. Ego, Dep. J 

E. T. W. Pearse... 

H. P. Christie 

Hugh Hunter 



Geo. Murray. 
Wm. Dodd .. . 



H. F. Wilmot 



Geo. Cunningham. 



S. R, Almond 



Sub-Recorder. 



Malcolm Ross. 
Jas. Porter. 
W. H. Simpson. 
Risdon M. Odell. 



Herbert Young. 
Geo. L. Anderson. 
W. H. Vickers. 
Geo. A. Shade. 
Robt. M. Stewart. 
Burt E. Daily. 
Ed. McCoskrie. 



Chris. Carlson. 



John Mathers. 
C. Harrison. 



Wm. Fox. 
Alex. C. Murray. 
F. W. Beatton. 
Ezra Evans. 
R. Gale. 
J. H. Patterson. 
F. E. Holt. 



David H. Anderson. 



David H. Anderson. 
Geo. E. Stephenson. 



Carl Hairsine. 



H. F. Wilmot. 
H. Nicholson. 
F. F. Ketchum. 



8 Ed. 7 



Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders. 



L 223 



GOLD COMMISSIONERS AND MINING RECORDERS.— Concluded. 



Mining Divisions. 



Osoyoos Mining Division. . 
Sub-office 

Golden Mining Division.. 
Windermere « 

Fort Steele Mining Div. . . 
Sub-office 

Ainsworth Mining Div . . . 

Sub-office 

// 

// 

Slocan Mining Division. . . 

Sub-office 

Slocan City Mining Div. . . 

Trout Lake Mining Div. . 

Sub-office 

Nelson Mining Division . . 

Sub-office 

Arrow Lake Min. Division 
Sub-office 

Revelstoke Mining Div. . . 

Lardeau Mining Division. 

Trail Creek Mining Div . . . 

Nanaimo Mining Division 

Sub-office 

// 

Alberni Mining Division . . 
Clayoquot n 

Quatsino n 

Victoria Mining Division . . 

New Westminster Min. D. 
Sub-office 



Location of 
Office. 



Fairview. 

Olalla.... 
Hedley . . 



Golden . 
Wilmer. 



Cranbrook 

Steele 

Fernie .... 
Moyie .... 
Marysville 



Kaslo 

Howser 

Poplar Creek , 
Trout Lake . . 



New Denver 
Sandon ... . 
Slocan City . 



Trout Lake . . 
Poplar Creek 

Nelson 

Creston 

Ymir 

Nakusp 

Vernon 



Revelstoke . 
Camborne . . 
Rossland . . 



Nanaimo . . 
Ladysmith . 
Alert Bay . 
Van Anda . 
Heriot Bay 



Albemi . . . 
Clayoquot 
Yreka . . . 



Victoria 

New Westminster. 

Vancouver 

Harrison Lake 
Chilliwhack 



Gold Commissioner. 



J. R. Brown 



J. E. Griffith 

// (at Golden) 



J. F. Armstrong. 



E. E. Chipman 



E.E. Chipman (at 
Kaslo) 



Harry Wright 



// (at Nelson) 



Robt. Gordon 

n (at Revelstoke) 

John Kirkup 

Marshal Bray 



H. C. Rayson 

n (at Alberni) 

// // 

R. A. Renwick .... 
C. C. Fisher 



Mining Recorder. 



Howard A. Turner. 



F. H. Bacon 
E. J. Scovil. 



R. J. Stenson 



Angus Mclnnes . 
H. R. Jorand. 
F. C. Campbell.. 
P. J. Gleazer 



W. Scott 



W. E. McLauchlin. 

B. E. Drew 

J. E. Hooson 

Marshal Bray 



H. C. Rayson 

W. T. Dawley . . 
0. A. Sherberg . . 

G. V. Cuppage . . 

John Mahony 



Sub-Record ?r. 



John McDonald. 
Carl Hairsine. 

Colin Cameron. 



Joseph Welsh. 
J. H. McMullin. 
Fred. J. Smyth. 
Louis E. Herchmer. 



Wm. John Green. 
W. Simpson. 
J. Simpson. 
F. C. Campbell. 



W. J. Parham. 



J. Simpson. 

J. Wilson. 
J. A. Fraser. 

H. F. Wilmot. 

Edward Edwards. 



J. Stewart. 
W". Woollacott. 
Geo. McK. McLeod 
W. F. Armstrong. 



R. J. Skinner. 
L. A. Agassiz. 
J.Pelly. 



8 Ed. 



Table of Contents. 



L 225 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Subject. 



Mineral Production 

Statistical Tables 

Progress of Mining during Year 

Bureau of Mines — Work of Year 

Assay Office Report 

Examination of Assayers 

List of Licensed » 

Examination of Coal Mine Officials 

List of Licensed « 

Cariboo District — Report on 

Cariboo Mining Division, n 

Quesnel a « 

Cassiar District : 

Atlin Mining Division — Rainy Hollow Camp 

i, „ — Report on 

Stiekine and Liard Mining Division — Report on 

Skeena Mining Division — Queen Charlotte Islands. . . 
« n — Report on 

Omineca « " 

Bulkley Valley 

a n Peace River- Yukon Trail . . . 

South-East Kootenay District : 

Fort Steele Mining Division — Report on 

n n Fissure in Rocks, Fernie 

North-East Kootenay District : 

Golden Mining Division— Report on 

Windermere a n 

North-West Kootenay District : 

Revelstoke Mining Division — Report on 

Trout Lake n » 

Lardeau n n 

Slocan District 

Ainsworth Mining Division — Report on 

Slocan « n 

Slocan City n n 

Nelson District : 

Nelson Mining Division — Report on 

Arrow Lake Mining Division — Report on 

Rossland District : 

Trail Creek Mining Division — Report on 

Boundary District : 

Greenwood Mining Division — Report on 

Grand Forks // « 

Osoyoos a a 

a a Camp Hedley 

Vernon District : 

Vernon Mining Division — Report on . 

Yale District — Report on 

Kamloops Mining Division — Report on 

n n — Notes on 



Ashcroft 



Nicola 



— Report on . 
— Notes on . , 



— Report on. 



Yale a 

Similkameen n n 

Lillooet District : 

Lillooet Mining Division — Report on . 

Clinton // » . . 

Vancouver Island and Coast District : 

Alberni Mining Division — Report on. 
n n — Notes on. . 

Clayoquot // — Report on . 



Submitted by 



Provincial Mineralogist . 



Assayer 



a Mineralogist . 

Gold Commissioner 

Mining Recorder 



Provincial Mineralogist 
I l-old Commissioner 



Provincial Mineralogist 
Gold Commissioner .... 



W. W. Leach, Geological Survey 
Provincial Mineralogist 



Gold Commissioner .... 
Provincial Mineralogist 



Gold Commissioner 
Mining Recorder . . 
Gold Commissioner 
Mining Recorder . . 



Gold Commissioner 
Mining Recorder . . 



Gold Commissioner 

Mining Recorder . . 



Gold Commissioner 
Gold Commissioner 



Charles Camsell, Geological Survey 
Gold Commissioner 



Provincial Mineralogist 

Mining Recorder 

Provincial Mineralogist 

Mining Recorder 



Gold Commissioner 



Gold Commissioner 
Provincial Assayer 
Mining Recorder . . 



Page. 



7 
7 to 14 
15 
24 
25 
26 
26 
28 
32 
37 
37 
41 

43 

48 
54 
57 
72 

75 

77 
82 

84 
87 

89 
90 
91 
91 
92 
93 
95 
95 
98 
101 

102 
105 

106 

109 
114 
116 
121 

128 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
138 
141 
143 
144 

145 
146 

147 
147 

148 



L 226 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1908 



TABLE OF CONTENTS.— Concluded. 



Subject. 



Vancouver Island and Coast District. — Concluded. 

Quatsino Mining Division — Notes on . . . , 

n n —Report on 

Nanaimo » n 

Victoria n — Notes on 

New Westminster Mining Division — Report on 

Geology of Coast and Islands 

Inspection of Metalliferous Mines : 

West Kootenay and Boundary Districts 

East Kootenay District 

Coast District 

List of Accidents in Metalliferous Mines 

n » Tabulated . . 
Coal Mining in British Columbia 

Collieries soon to be producing 

Coal prospects 

Collieries of Coast District 

Inspection of Coal Mines 

Vancouver Island and Coast Inspection District 

East Kootenay Inspection District 

Accidents in British Columbia Collieries, 1907 

Summary, 1898-1907.. 

Detailed Statement of Accidents, Coast District 

n n East Kootenay Dist. 

Shipping Mines — List of 

Crown-granted Mineral Claims, 1907 

Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders — List of 

Table of Contents 

Index 



List of Illustrations 

Library Catalogue slips . 



Submitted by 



Provincial Mineralogist 

Mining Recorder 

Gold Commissioner 

Provincial Mineralogist 

Mining Recorder 

J. A. Bancroft, Geological Survey 

Inspector of District' 



Provincial Mineralogist 



Inspector of District . . . 
Provincial Mineralogist 

/; n 

Inspector of District . . . 

n a . . . 

Provincial Mineralogist 



Page. 



149 
151 
152 
154 
158 
159 

162 

163 
163 
165 
169 
170 
171 
172 
173 
174 
174 
194 
201 
202 
203 
207 
213 
216 
222 
225 
227 
235 
237 



Index. 



L 227 



INDEX. 



A. 



Note. — Mineral claim* in italics. 



Accidents in Collieries — Tables of 201, 

Ainsworth Mining Division 

Ajax 73, 

A labama 

Albatross group 

Alberni District 

Notes by Provincial Assayer 

Mining Division, report of Gold Commissioner 

Aldermere 

American creek 

American Boy 

American Girl 

Anaconda 



Anna Era 

Annie 

Annie Fraction . . 
Antler Creek .... 

A rgenta 

Arlington (Slocan) 



Page. 

21 12 

95 

13(3 

40 

136 

147 

147 

147 

76 

73 

100 

73 

70 

118 

80 

107 

107 

40 

96 

101 



A rlington (Erie) 102, 103 

Arrow Lake Mining Division : 

Report of Mining Recorder 105 

Ashcroft Mining Division : 

Report of Mining Recorder 133 

Assay Office, report of 25 

Assayers : 

Examinations for 26 

List of certificated 26 

Athabaska Landing 82 

Atlin 47 



Ltd. 



Atlin Consolidated Mining Co 

Atlin Mining Division : 

( Told Recovered 20, 53 

Notes by Provincial Mineralogist on Rainy 

Hollow camp 43 

Report of Gold Commissioner 48 

A urora 84 

Awaya, Ikeda & Co 63 



B. 



Ball group 137 

Baltimore 96 

Bancroft, J. Austen, report on Geological Forma- 
tion of Coast 159 

Batchelor 98 

Bay 109 

B. C. Amalgamated Coal Co 140, 142 

B. C. Copper Co. : 

Greenwood M D. , production in 1907 109 

Greenwood Smelter 113 

Mines in Grand Forks M. D 1 15 

B. G. mine 112, 115 

B. C. Standard Mining Co 104 

Bear 40 

Bear creek 144 

Bear lake 96 

Bear river 73 

Discovery of coal 172 

Beavis 52 

Bella Coola Mining Division 74 

Recently included in Skeena Mining Division. 74 

Bella Coola Group of claims . 74 

Ben Bolt 73 

Ben Hur 73 

Berniere 94 

Big Bend District : 

Quartz claims 91 

Big Bend trail, prospects on Seymour Arm 132 

Berry Creek Mining Co., Ltd ... .54, 55 

Big Ltdge . 105 

Billy Goat 117 

Bimetallic 74 

Birch creek .">( I 

Bitter creek 73 



Black Bear 106 

Black Diamond 90, 95 

Blue Bell (Ainsworth) 22, 96 

Bluebell Group (Victoria) 155 

Blue Bird (Slocan) 100 

Bluebird (Victoria) 154 

Boulder creek 50 

Boundary District : 

Ore mined 109 

Ore produced for the last eight years 115 

Report of Gold Commissioner 109 

Tonnage treated at the various smelters in 1907 . 112 

Boundary Falls smelter 113 

Brick 23 

Britannia 158 

British American Dredging Co., Ltd 50 

Boundary District : 

Inspection of mines 162 

Britannia Co.'s smelter at Crofton 152 

Broadview 91, 92 

Brooklyn-Idaho 109, 1 10 

Brown- Alaska Co . 72, 74 

Buffalo 100 

Building stone 23 

Bulkley valley : 

Report by W. YV. Leach 77 

Coal in 80 

Geology 78 

Mineral claims .... 77 

Topography 77 

Bull river 85 

Bureau of Mines, work of the year 24 

Burnabv Island 68 



L 228 



Index. 



C. 



California 100 

Calumet 93 

Cambrian 84 

Camp Beaconsfield 118 

Camp Hedley 119 

n economic geology . . 125 

» geological report by Charles Cam sell J "21 

n general geology. 123 

n topography . 122 

Camp McLeod group 133 

Camsell, Charles ; geological notes on Camp Hed- 
ley 121 

Canada Zinc Co 22 

Canadian 9S 

Canadian creek 40 

Canadian Metal Co 96 

Carbonado colliery 86, 200 

Cariboo Consolidated Co 39 

Cariboo District 37 

Cariboo and Quesnel Mining Divisions 37 

Placer mining in 21 

Report of Gold Commissioner . ... 37 

Cariboo Mining Division, alterations of bound- 
aries 37 

Cassias District 43-83 

Atlin Mining Division 43-54 

Peace river- Yukon trail 82 

Cement 23 

Production in Victoria District 157 

Centre Star 106 

Charlemont 90 

Chrysanthemum group of claims 64 

Clayburn, deposit of tire clay 23 

Clayoquot Mining Division, report of Mining 

Recorder 148 

Clearwater river 54 

Clinton Mining Division, Report of Gold Com- 
missioner 1-16 

Coal creek 80 

a colliery 195 

„ « reported danger from rock 

slides 87 

Coal Hill 130 

Coal mining in B. C 170 

Fort Steele M. D 85 

Nicola Valle} - 141 

Rocky Mountain coal fields 20 

Coal Mine Officials : 

Examinations for 28 

Board of Examiners 29 

List of certificates of competency 33-36 

Coal Mines — reports of inspection : — 

East Kootenay District 194 

Vancouver Island and Coast 174 

Coal Production : 

Diagram shewing production 8 

Distribution of output, 1907 171 

Production in 1907 171 

Percentage of increase in 1907 J 70 

// exported n 171 

Tables of production 11, 14, 17, 18 

Markets for 19 

Coal Prospects 1 72 

Bear river 57 



Page. 
Coal Prospects. — Concluded. 

Bulkley vallev 80 

Coal gully 138 

Powers creek, Vernon M. D 129 

Yale District 130 

Quatsino 1 50 

Soon to be producing 171 

Coast Collieries 19 

Coast District 163 

Coast — Report on Geological Formation 159 

Coke, condition of market 20 

Diagram shewing production 8 

Tables of production 11, 14, 17, 18 

Collieries 18, 19 

Accidents, tables of 201, 202 

Returns, -see "Returns." 

Rockj' Mountain coal field 201 

Crow's Nest Pass collieries 201 

Hosmer tunnels 201 

Vancouver Island and Coast 173 

Nanaimo — The Western Fuel Co 174 

Fiddick 18, 188 

(lilfillan 18, 186 

„ New East Wellington 190 

Extension — Wellington Colliery Co 181 

Cumberland — " Union Colliery 183 

Nicola Valley — Middlesboro 138 

Diamond Vale ....140, 142, 193 

Collison bay 65 

Colorado Assaying and Refining Co. . 144 

Columbia 73 

Commodore 1 52 

Comox — Union Colliery 183 

Computation of statistical tables — 

Coal 18 

Metals 7 

Comstock 90 

Cons. Cariboo Hydraulic Mining Co 42 

Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada 106 

Tonnage mined in Greenwood M. D 109 

Mines in Grand Forks M. D 115 

Contention 79 

Copper 22 

Average prices during 1906 and 1907 113 

Production of districts 22 

Copper Canyon group 1">4 

Copper Cliff ( Ains worth) . 96 

Copper Cliff Mining Co 153 

Copper King group 133 

Copper Islands 68 

Copper Queen 66 

Copper River . . 77 

Corbin group of claims 86 

Corinth 100 

Cork 97 

Cornell 118, 152, 153 

Cotton Belt group 131, 133 

Cotton Belt mines 131 

Countess 79 

Crofton, Britannia Co.'s smelter 152 

Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co 20, 194 

Cumberland, Union Colliery 1S3 

Cunningham creek 40 



D. 



Dead wood Camp Ill 

Ihakin's Claim 66 

Dease creek 55 

Dease lake — placer mining in 21 



Determinations, free 25 

Diamond Vale Coal & Iron Mines, Ltd. 140, 142, 193 
Dick, Arch., report of inspection of Vancouver 

Island and Coast District 174 



Index. 



L 220 



Page, I 
Distances bv Police Trail between Edmonton and 

Hazelton 83 | 

Districts, percentages and tonnages of ore mined 18*1 

Dividend mountain 118 i 

Dolphin 119 | 

Dominion 118 

Dominion Copper Co. : 

Boundary Falls Smelter 113 

Mines at Phoenix 110, 111 j 

Mines in Grand Forks Mining Division 114 I 

E 

East Kootenay District : 

Inspection of mines 162 

Report of inspection of collieries 194 

East Wellington Colliery 18 

Eight-mile lake 40 

Eldorado 79 

Elk river 86 

Mineral claims on 86 

Elkhorn (Boundary) 109 

Elhhorn (Slocan) 99 

Ells, Dr. E. W., analyses of coal in Nicola 

District 139 

Elsie 160 



Page. 
Dominion Copper Co.— Concluded. 

Tonnage mined in Greenwood Mining Division . 109 

Dominion Fairview Copper Co 121 

Dredging for placer gold 21 

Duchess 7!' 

Duncan 109 

Duncan river 96 

Dunsmuir District 153 

Dusky Maiden 6S 



Emerald 102, 103 

Emma 112, 115 

Empre. m 96 

Eureka 103 

Eureka-Richmond 98 

Eva 91. 94 

Evi ning 79 

Eve n in ;i Star 107 

Examinations : 

For assayers ... 26 

For coal mine officials 28 

Extension Colliery 181 



id 47 

Favourite 121 

Fernie. reported danger from rock-slides 87 

Fiddiok Colliery 18, 188 

Fifty Cents 128 

Fire-brick 23 

Fire-clay 23 

Fire Valley Gold Mining Co 128 

Flint 97 

Flon ace 120 

Fori st Rose 38 



Fort Connelly, Police trail 82, 83 

Fort Grahame, // 82, 83 

Fort St. John 82 

Fort Steele Mining Division: 

Placer mining 21 

Report of Gold Commissioner 84 

Xotes by Provincial Mineralogist 85 

Frank, Alberta, erection of Zinc Smelter 22 

Fraser river — Dredging for Gold 21 

French creek ... 91 



Geological Report on Coast Formation 159 

George E 73 

Germansen creek 75 

Giant-California 106, 107 

Gibraltar . 118 

Gilnllan Colliery 18, 186 

Gipsy group 73 

Goat creek 78 

Golconda Ill 

Gold 20 

Gold Bottom creek 52 

Gold Cliff 67 

Gold Commissioners, list of 222 

Gold Drop 110 

Gold Drop-Curlew 1 14 

Gold harbour 72 

Gold Peak 68 

Gold Run , - 49 

Golden Croum : 74 

Golden Eagle 109, 115 

Golden Giant 89 

Golden Mixing Division 89 



Golden Zone 120 

Goldstream — Coal deposits 81 

Goodtnough 100 

Granby mines 109 

Granby — Ore shipments 110 

Granby smelter 112, 114, 116 

Grand Forks Mining Division : 

Ore shipped during 1907 115 

Report of Gold Commissioner 114 

Granite creek, coal at . 130 

Granite creek 144 

Graphic 101 

Green mountain 118 

Greenwood Mining Division: 

Report of Gold Commissioner 109 

Greenwood Smelter 113 

Greyhound 112 

Grizzley 73 

Grouse creek .... 40 

Guggenheims 49 

Guggenheim Exploration Co., work at Bullion. . 42 

Guinea Gold 96 



H. 



Hall Mining & Smelting Co 104 

Handy 93 

Harriet Harbour 66 

Hazelton 83 

Hecla 93 



Hedley — See Camp Hedley. 

Production of stamp-mill at , 21 

Hercules 68 

Hetty Green group 148 

Hewitt 99 



L 230 



Index. 



Highland group 136 

Highlander 95 

Highland valley— Notes by Prov. Mineralogist. . 136 

Homestake 117 

Horrible 47 

Horseshoe 118 



Page. 

Hosmer Colliery 20, 86, 171 

Howson basin 76 

Howson creek 79 

Hudson Bay mountain 76 

Hunter V. 104 

Huston Inlet 67 



I. 



Ida 68 

Idaho (Trail creek) 106 

Idaho (Rossland) 109, 110, 111 

Idaho-Alamo 100 

Ikeda Bay — Mines at 63 

Ikeda mines 63, 72 

Illustrations, list of 235 

Imperial Coal & Coke Co 86. 172 

Independence group 144 

Independence mountain 118 

Index 97 

Indian Chief group 148 



Ingenika river 76, 83 

Inland Empire 108 

Inspection of coal mines 175 

Inspection of metalliferous mines 162 

Iron 22 

At Quatsino 149 

Iron Mask SO, 106 

Iron Mountain 67 

Island Copper Co 153 

I. X. L 93 

Lskut river 54 



Japanese mine on Q. C. Islands 63 

Jedwav — Townsite of 66 

Jessie-Blu* Bird 96 

Jingo Bird 148 



Josie 10' 

June group 151 

Jumbo 73 



K. 



Kallapa group 148 

Kamloops Mining Division 131 

Kaslo creek 96, 97 

Keremeos valley 117 

Keystone group (Ashcroft) 136 

Keystone | Nelson) . 102, 103 

Kimberley — Mineral claims 85 

King Solomon 96, 155 

Kingston 120 

Kingston group of claims, geology 127 



Kitimat 74 

Kitsilas canyon 76 

Klunkwoi bay 69 

Koksilah . . 155 

Kootenay Belle 102, 103 

Kootenay Central Railway 90 

Kootenay, South-East, see South-East Kootenay 

Kfio 95 

Krueer mountain 121 



La Fontaine 

La Plata Mining Co 

Labour : 

Employed in collieries, character of 

,, „ See ' ' returns, col- 
liery- 
Employed per ton of ore mined 

Western Federation of Mines order strike at 

Marble Bay 

Strikes in the Boundary 

Lake View 

Lardeau Mining Division : 

Report of Mining Recorder 

Larsen 

Last Chance group 

Lenora 

Le Roi Mining Co 

Le Boi Xo. 2 

Lead 

Lemon creek 

Lesser Slave lake post 

Lesser Slave river 

Let Her go Gallagher 

Liard Mining Division 

Libby 

Lightning creek 

Lillooet District 



39 
104 

171 



16 

152 

109 

73 

93 

69 

70 

154 

106 

106 

21 

101 

82 

82 

95 

55 

95 

38 

145 



Lillooet Mining Division : 

Report of Gold Commissioner 

Lime — Production in Victoria District 

Lily group of claims 

Lily mine, sketch map 

Lime 

Lime-Silica brick 

List of : 

Accidents in metalliferous mines 

collieries 

Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders. . . 

Illustrations 

Metalliferous mines shipping in 1907 

Little Deloire creek 

Little Donald 

Little Joe 

Lode Gold 

Lode Mines 8, 

Lone Star 

Lome 131, 

Lome Co 

Lost creek 

Lotus group 

Lowhee creek 

Loyal Lease 

L ucky Jack 

L ucky Jim 



145 
157 
63 
63 
23 
23 

165 

201 

222 

275 

213 

55 

95 

73 

21 

9 

118 

145 

145 

75 

65 

38 

153 

91 

•» 



Index. 



L 231 



M. 



Macgowan & Co 

Maggie 

Magnetic separation of zinc ores 

Maid of Erin 46, 47, 

Majestic 

Manson creek 

Maple bay 

Marble Bay group 

McAllister 

McCulloch creek 

Me Dame creek 

McKee creek 

Meal Ticket 

Metalliferous mines : 

List of accidents 

n tabulated 

Reports of Inspectors 

Michel Colliery 

Middlesboro Colliery 18, 139 : 

M'nl night 

Millie Mack 

Mining Recorders, list of 

Minnie 

Mineral production 

Mocking Bird 



Page. 

186 
99 
96 
73 
99 
75 
74 

152 
99 
91 
55 
48 
65 

165 
169 
162 
198 
191 
101 
105 
222 
"73 



Page. 

Modoc 67 

Mollit Gibson 104 

Molly Hughes 99 

Mona rch 89 

Montana 47 

Montezuma 97 

Moore Investment Co., shipments of iron ore 

from Quatsino 149 

Moreen 112 

Moresby island 67 

Report by Provincial Mineralogist 57 

Sketch map of southern portion 62 

Moricetown, coal deposits 81 

Morning group 93 

Morrison 109 

Mosquito creek 40 

Mother Lode 102, 103, 111 

Mount Baker and Yale Mining Co 143 

Mount Sicker camp 154 

Mount Zion 1 19 

Mountain Con 100 

Mountain Rose 115, 119 

Movie river 85 

Mucho Oro 38 

Myrtle 101 



N. 



Xahob 

Naiad 

Nanaimo Collieries 

Nanaimo District 

Nanaimo Mixing Division : 

Report of Gold Commissioner 

X'^jiawa 

Nellie 

Nelson District : 

Report of C4old Commissioner 

Nelson Mining Division 

Nest Egg 

New East Wellington Colliery 

New Jerusalem 

New Westminster Mining Division : 

Report by Mining Recorder 

Nickel Plate (Boundary) 

Nickel Plate, Geology of 124, 

Nicola Coal Field . . ." 

Analyses of coal 



73 

79 

174 

152 

152 

101 
119 

102 
102 

107 

190 
95 

158 
119 
126 
138 
139 



Nicola Mining Division : 

Notes by Provincial Mineralogist 138 

Report of Mining Recorder 141 

Nicola Valley Coal & Coke Co 18, 138, 191 

No. 1 (Rossland) 107 

No. 1 ( Vernon) 124 

No. 1 shaft, Nanaimo 175 

Nome ■ 98 

North Columbia Gold Mining Co 49 

North Star 84, 85 

North-East Kootenay District : 

Report of Gold Commissioner 89 

North-West Kootenay District : 

Report of Gold Commissioner 91 

Northern Coal & Coke Co 86 

Northern Mines, Ltd 50 

Northfield Mine 178 

Nova Scotia . 48 

Nugget 102, 103 

Nugget gulch 40 



o. 



Observatory Inlet 74 

O'Donnell river 

Office Statistics : 

Ainsworth Mining Division 

Alberni n 



Arrow Lake 

Ashcroft 1 

Atlin 

Cariboo 

Clayoquot 

Clinton 

Fort Steele 

Golden 

Grand Forks 

Greenwood 

Kam loops 

Lardeau 

Lillooet 

Nanaimo 

Nelson 

New Westminster 



51 

98 

147 

105 

134 

52 

40 

148 

146 

86 

89 

116 

114 

132 

94 

145 

153 

104 

158 



Office Statistics. — Concluded. 

Nicola Mining Division 142 



Omineca 

Osoyoos n 

Revelstoke » 

Similkameen n 

Skeena n 

Slocan n 

Slocan City » 
Stikine and Liard n 

Trail Creek n 

Trout Lake « 

(Quatsino n 

Vernon n 

Victoria n 

Windermere » 

Yale n 



76 
121 

92 
144 

74 
100 
101 

56 
108 

93 
151 
129 
157 

90 
143 



Oil and oil shales 23 

Okanagan lake, claims on 128 

Olalla Camp 119 

Old Gold 96 



L 232 



Index. 



Page. 

Old Ironsides 114 

Old Shaft 71 

Olla Podrida 107 

Omineca Mixing Division : 

Alteration of boundaries 75 

Report of Gold Commissioner 75 

Sub-recording offices 75 

Ore mined during 1907 15 

Oregon 120 



Orphan Boy 131" 

Oro Dtnoro 112, 115 

Osoyoos Mining Division : 

Report of Gold Commissioner , 116 

Ottawa 101 

Otter creek 51 

Outsidi rs 72, 74 

Oyster Criterion 94 



P. 



Pacific Coal Co 171 

Paymaster , 90 

Payne 99 

Peace river-Yukon trail 82 

Peacock group 138 

Pendrell Sound 161 

Percentage of ore mined in various districts .... 19 

Perry creek 85 

Peters creek 39 

Phoenix, description of Granby mines 109 

Pine Apple US 

Pine creek 49 

Pine Creek Power Co 49 

Placer Gold 10, 17, 20 

Platinum 23 

Police Trail, distances between Edmonton and 

Hazelton 83 

Pontiac 96 

Poole, Francis, prospects on Queen Charlotte 

Islands 69 

Poorman 1 () 7 

Poorman- Granite 103 

Port Renfrew 154 

Portland Canal Mining and Developmont Co . . . 73 

Powers creek coal prospects 129 

n diamond drilling operations 129 

Placer mining : 

Atlin Mining Division 44, 48 

Cariboo » 37 

Fort Steele n So 



Placer Mining. — Concluded. 

Lillooet a 

Quesnel » 

Skeena n 

Yale District 

Prince s Iron Claims 

Princess 

Production of mineral by districts and divisions. 
n mineral for 1907 — comparison with 

that of previous years 

Progress of mining 

Protection Island 

Providence 

P 'rod nee 

Provincial Assa\~er : 

Notes on Alberni District 

Summer trip to Alberni 

Work of the year 

Provincial Mineralogist : 

Notes on Ashcroft Mining Division 

« Fort Steele claims 

a Highland valley 

// Nicola valley 

a Peace river- Yukon trail 

a Rainy Hollow 

a Quatsino Mining Division 

n Seymour river 

Report on fissure in rocks above Coal Creek . . 

» Queen Charlotte Islands 

Summer field work 



Q. 



Quatsino Coal Syndicate 150 

Quatsi:.o Mining Division : 

Notes by Provincial Mineralogist 149 

Coal areas ... 150 

Gold prospects . . 151 

Iron ore 22, 149 

Report of Mining Recorder 151 

Queen SO, 102, 103 

Queen Bess . . . . 100 

Queen Victoria 102 

Quesnel Mining Division : 

Alteration of Southern Boundary 41 

Report of Mining Recorder 41 



Queen Charlotte Islands : 

Report by Provincial Mineralogist. 

Climate 

First mining on 

Game. 



Geological 

Historical 

Old shaft discovered 

Deputy Recording Offices 

To be made into a separate Mining Division 
(foot note) 



145 

41 

73 

130 

149 

79 

9 

9 

15 

176 

1(19 
97 

147 
25 



134 

85 

135 

138 

82 

43 

149 

132 

87 

61 

24 



61 
58 
61 
6(> 
58 
71 
73 



R. 



Rainy Hollow 52 

Rainy Hollow Camp : 

Notes by the Provincial Mineralogist 43 

Rapid creek 93 

Baichide 110, 114 

Beco 67, 99, 144 

Beco, Queen Charlotte Islands 67 

Beco, Slocan 98 

Beco group (Similkameen) 144 

Rebbeck, James K., report on Silica Brick 157 

Bed Elephant 96 

Returns, Colliery : 

Coast collieries, gross output 173 



Returns, Colliery. — Continued. 

Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd 194 

Carbonado 194, 200 

Coal Creek 194, 195 

Michel 194, 198 

Nicola Vallev Coal and Coke Co., Ltd 192 

Middlesboro Colliery 192 

Macgowan & Co., Gilfillan Colliery 185 

South Wellington Coal Mines, Ltd 188 

Fiddick Colliery 188 

Summary for Province 171 

Yancouver-Nanaimo Coal Mining Co., Ltd., 

New East Wellington Colliery 190 



Index. 



L 233 



Page. 
Returns, Colliery. — Concluded. 

Wellington Colliery Co • 180 

Extension Colliery 182 

Union Colliery 185 

Western Fuel Co.'s mines 175 

No. 1 Shaft and Protection Island 177 

Northfield 179 

Revelstoke & McCulloch Creek Hydraulic M. Co 91 

Revelstoke Division — Report of Mining Recorder 91 

Revenue 97 

Bex 73 

Richard III 155 



Page- 

Riordan Mountain 117 

Riverside 109 

Rose 65 

Rosella Creek 56 

Rossland District. 

Report of Gold Commissioner 106 

Inspection of mines 162 

R. N. W. Mounted Police, Peace river, Yukon 

trail 82 

Ruby creek 51 

Russian Creek Mining Co 40 

Ruth 100 



Sally 109 

Salmon River 73 

Scotia 118 

Sea King ... 69 

Second Relief 102, 103 

Seymour River District : 

Approaches to mineral claims 133 

Sheep Creek 102, 103 

Shining Beauty 89 

Shipping mines, table shewing distribution .... 15 

Shipping mines, list of 213 

Shuswap Lake — Prospects on Seymour arm .... 132 

Silica Brick & Lime Co 23, 155 

Silica Brick — Description of process of manufac- 
ture 157 

Silver 21 

Output during 1907 17 

Silver Cup 91, 92 

Silver Dollar 91 

Silver Glance 96 

Silver Heels 79 

Silver King 104 

Silver Star 147 

Similkameen Mining & Smelting Co 144 

SlMILKAMEEN MINING DIVISION : 

Report of Mining Recorder 144 

Skeena Mixing Division 57, 72 

Alteration of boundary 57 

Office Statistics 74 

Queen Charlotte Islands — Report by Provin- 
cial Mineralogist 57 

Report of Gold Commissioner 72 

Sub-recording offices 74 

Skeena river, steamboat navigation on 83 

Skincuttle inlet 61 

Skincuttle island claims 69 

Skylark 109 

Slate creek 75 

Slocan City Mining Division : 

Report by Mining Recorder 101 

Slogan District : 

Report of Gold Commissioner 95 

Slocan Mining Division 95 

Report by Mining Recorder 98 



Slocaii Sovereign 99 

Slocan Star 100 

Slough creek 39 

Smith creek 91 

Snowshoe 110, 115 

South-East Kootenay District 84 

Snyder process of smelting zinc ores 22 

Societe Miniere de la Colombie Britannique .... 50 

Sonora 44 

Sooke 154 

South Wellington Coal Mines, Ltd 188 

Spitzee 107 

Spokane- Trinket 95 

Springer creek , 101 

Spruce Creek Power Co. , Ltd 50 

St. Eugene 84, 85 

Stamp-mill at Hedley 21 

Standard 79, 99, 118 

Statistical tables : 

ItoX 7-14 

Explanation of 16, 17, 18 

Stemwinder 110, 116 

Stewart Mining & Development Co 73 

Stikine and Liard Mining Divisions : 

Report of Gold Commissioner 54 

Stikine Mining Division 54 

Stone — building 23 

Storm group 137 

Storraway 47 

Strathmore 109 

Strike at Marble Bay ordered by Western Feder- 
ation of Miners 152 

Strikes of coal miners on the Boundary 109 

Sudbury Ill 

Sullivan 84, 85 

Summit Camp 112 

Summit group 145 

Sunbeam 73 

Sundown 73 

Sunset 100, 11 1 

Sunshine 100 

Sure Copper 74 

Surprise 68, 100 

Swede group (Moresby Island) 69 



Table of Contents 225 

Tamarack (Slocan) 101 

Tamarack group (Ashcroft) • 136 

Tar flats 21 

Tariff 95 

Tecumseh 90 

Telkwa 79 

Telkwa mines, Ltd 79 

Telkwa Mining, Milling and Development Co. 79, 80 



Telkwa Valley, Geological Report by W. W. 

Leach 77 

Coal 80 

Geology 78 

Mineral claims 78 

Topography 77 

Ten-Mile creek 101, 142 

Thibert creek 55 

Texada Consolidated Co 153 



L 234 



Index. 



Page. 

Texada island 152 

Thistle Gold Co 40 

Thomlinson, Wm. — Notes on Seymour River Dist 132 

Thompson river — Dredging for gold 21 

Tom creek 76 

Tower Hill 80 

Transvaal group 135 

Trail Creek Mixing Division 106 

Trout Lake Mining Division : 

Report of Mining Recorder 92 



True Blue 153 

True Fissure Mining and Milling Co 93 

Tulameen river 144 

n coal on 130 

Twelve-Mile creek 101 

Tyee Copper Co 154 

n — Extension of Smelter at Ladysmith 154 

Tyee mine . . 154 

Tyee smelter 152 



u. 



Union Colliery 183 



V. 



Valdes Island 153 ] 

Values in production, prices used in calculating : |j 

Coal is; 

Metals 7 

Vancouver 100 

Vancouver Island and Coast 147. 

Vancouver Island and Coast Collieries 18, 174 

Vancouver-Nanaimo Coal Mining Co 1H(V 

Vancouver Portland Cement Co 23 J 

Vernon District 128^ 



Vernon Mining Division : 

Report of Gold Commissioner 128 

Victor 84 

Victoria 46 

Victoria shaft at Phi t-nix 110 

Victoria District 154 

Victoria Mining Division : 

Notes by Provincial Mineralogist 154 

Vital creek ... 76 



w. 



Wages paid in collieries 171 

Wagner group 96 

Wakefidd : 99, 100 

Waneta 121 

War Eagle 106, 115 

War Horse 120 

Washington 100 

Waterdown Fraction 121 

Waverly 40 

Wayside 145 

Wellington Colliery Co 180 

Extension Colliery 181 

Union Colliery 183 

West Kootenay District, inspection of mines. . . 162 

Western Coal and Oil Co 86 

Western Fuel Co 174 

Inspection of mines 174 

Returns for 1907 175 



Westmont Group 101 

Wheal Tamar 131 

Whimpering Wind 79 

White/rater 97 

Whitewater mines 97 

White Bear 106, 107 

Wild Horse creek 21, 85 

Williams 40 

Williams creek 38 

Willow river 39 

Wilson creek 51 

Windermere Mining Division. ... 90 

Windy Arm 52 

Wonderful 44, 100 

Woodbury creek 96 

Wormald creek 39 

Wright creek 51 



X. 



X. L. mine 154 



Y. 



Yale District : 

Coal boring operations 130 

Report of Gold Commissioner 130 

Yale Dredging Co 143 

Yale Mining Co 119 

Nickel Plate mine 126 



Yale Mining Division : 

Report of Mining Recorder 143 

Yankee Girl and Ynkon 102 

Ya-Ya 100 

Yellowstone < 103 

Ymir 102 

Yukon, trail from Peace river 82 



Zinc 



Uncertainty as to U. S. Tariff Regulations . 



z. 

22 I Zinc — Electric smelting of 22 

98 | Zymoetz (Copper) river 77 



Illustrations. 



L 235 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Amalgamated McKee Creek hydraulic workings, McKee Creek, Atlin Facing p. 

Bonnington Falls, Kootenay River 

Collison Bay, Moresbj* Island, Q. C. I., Meal Ticket M. C. tunnel 

Gypsum deposit across Thompson River from Spatsum 

Jkeda Bay, Moresby Island, Q. C. I., Exposure of Magnetite, Rose M. C 

n it n Ikeda Mines, House Boat 

Xo. 1 Tunnel, " Lily " M. C 

No. 2 i, n 

a n n Rock Formation at Entrance 

n a n Wharf at . . , 

Klukwan, interior of Chief's House, Chilkat District 



Lily Mine, Ikeda Ba*y — map of 

Locke Bay, inner end of Klunkwoi Bay, Queen Charlotte Islands 

Moresby Island, map of portion of 

Nicola Valley C. & C. Co., Camp and Xo. 1 Tipple, Middlesboro Colliery 
n ii Xo. 2 Tipple, n a 

a n entrance to No. 1 Mine, -/ » 



a C. & C. Co.'s property, first opening on Coal Gully .' 

n a a hollow concretion large enough to contain a man .... 

Nicola Valley, overlooking Diamond Vale Coal Co.'s property 

Rainy Hollow, Atlin Mining Division, map of mineral claims 

n Chilkat District, Atlin Mining Division — view down 

Reco Mineral Claim shaft, Harriet Harbour, Moresbj' Island. 

Silica Brick & Lime Co's. plant, near Victoria 

Skidegate, Town of, Queen Charlotte Islands 

Seymour River — map of District 

Tyee Copper Co. ; s Smelter, Ladysmith, B. C 

Table shewing comparative mineral production of British Columbia and other Provinces of 

Dominion for 1907 

Table shewing mineral production from 1S86 to 1907 



32 

16 

64 

96 

56 

56 

80 

SO 

64 

72 

40 

63 

88 

62 

112 

112 

128 

128 

144 

144 

136 

45 

48 

88 

160 

72 

132 

152 

14 

8 



VICTORIA, B.C. 
Printed by Richard Wolfexden, I.S.O., V.D., Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty. 

1908. 



^ 



LIBRARY CATALOGUE SLIPS. 



[Take this leaf out and paste the separated titles upon three of your catalogue 
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British Columbia. Bureau of Mines. 

Annual Report of the Minister of Mines for the year ending 
31st December, 1907, being an account of mining operations 
for gold, coal, etc., in the Province. William Fleet Robertson, 
Provincial Mineralogist. 237 p. plates, maps, 1907. 
Victoria, Government Printing Office, 1908. 



Robertson, William Fleet. (Provincial Mineralogist.) 

Annual Report of the Minister of Mines of British Columbia 
for the year ending 31st December, 1907, being an account of 
mining operations for gold, coal, etc., in the Province. (British 
Columbia. Bureau of Mines.) 237 p. plates, maps, 1907. 

Victoria, Government Printing Office, 1908. 



Annual Report of the Minister of Mines of British Columbia 
for the year ending 31st December, 1907, being an account of 
mining operations for gold, coal, etc., in the Province. William 
Fleet Robertson, Provincial Mineralogist. (British Columbia, 
Bureau of Mines). 237 p., plates, maps, 1907. 

Victoria, Government Printing Office, 1908. 







. Q0 19 1365 



TN 


British Columbia. Dept. 


27 


of Mines and Petroleum 


B7 


Resources 


1907 


Report 


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